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So long iOS. Hello Android!

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  • So long iOS. Hello Android!

    I bought an iPad directly from Apple, maybe, three years ago. When I signed up with iCloud, I accidentally made a typo in the email address. Their asinine security questions accompanying the sign up were things for which I had no solid answers, like, "What is your favorite song?" and "Who was your best friend in Elementary School?"

    In other words, I can't get them to send me a new password, since the email account is non-existent. When I call them up, they ask for answers to their stupid security questions, for which I have no ready answers.

    Anyway, I've been able to use the iPad (just not the original iCloud account) until this past weekend. Their latest so-called upgrade made it impossible to log into the iPad without reactivating the gadget using the original email and password. The email address is non-existent and the password long forgotten since I've never been able to use it. In other words, Apple has deliberately made the iPad completely unusable. They're refusing to help me out and are telling me that the machine is permanently disabled with no options for recovery.

    After being an Apple customer since 1984, I just ordered my first Samsung Galaxy tablet to replace the iPad. Never again will I ever buy another iOS product! I'd switch over to Windows from OS X too if it weren't for me not being able to tolerate Windows. Anyway, for everything mobile, Android here I come.

  • #2
    You have had a painful experience with technology and you are not the first to have problems with a forgotten password, but . . .

    You spelt your own email address wrong, can't remember answers to the security questions and didn't make a note of your password. And you blame Apple.

    You could have registered the misspelt email address (I still got 10 spare I'll never use).
    You could have taken the security questions seriously instead of dismissing them as stupid and refusing to come up with memorable answers
    You could have used a password you can remember or made a note of it somewhere.

    Blame Apple for having any security at all on wifi enabled devices and FFS do you really think Android will be any different if you want to get online?
    Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

    Comment


    • #3
      Monkey makes a valid point.

      Nevertheless, it does the commercial valve in my heart good to witness a conversion in the right direction. Acceptance of Apple's closed-end, we'll-decide-what-you-like, next-upgrade-could-disable-your-compatibility-with-anything approach is something I just could never reconcile; and it's not anything new. For me, the trouble started with with the Mac 7.something upgrade to "Harmony" (it's burned in my memory thanks to the ironic nickname), in the late '90's. Running both platforms for almost 20 years, my wonderfully flexible Windows-based stuff was never, ever as fiddly as Apple's one-way-or-no-way, dead-end-filled maze. Good riddance.

      Okay, enough with the hyphens.
      I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

      Comment


      • #4
        I hear the FBI knows a a hacker guy that could probably help you get back into your iPad.

        Comment


        • #5
          Welcome to the light side! Don't get me wrong I love my mac computer, but I never adopted iOS.

          SM does have a point, but I also think that if you can produce the receipt of item they should be able to work with you. Would they not text you a confirmation number or any other means of secondary security? Most things now you register your phone number as well.
          Design is not decoration.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by StudioMonkey View Post
            You spelt your own email address wrong, can't remember answers to the security questions and didn't make a note of your password. And you blame Apple.
            Well, yeah, actually I do blame Apple.

            When I bought the iPad, the whole iCloud sign-up thing was never billed as a security thing as much as it was promoted as a way to keep one's files in the cloud. Setting up an Apple account of any kind was more about the purchase at hand -- not a mandatory pass key for the item that was just purchased.

            Fixing my mistyped email wasn't a priority since there was nothing of any importance tied to the Apple account that the email was tied to and it kept me off Apple's marketing list. Writing down my answers to their asinine security questions about favorite colors and favorite songs was unimportant because it was tied to nothing more important than an iCloud account that I had no use for.

            What I really blame Apple for is imposing new security measures on old iPhones and tablets that are tied to accounts that were never billed in the first place as being accounts that were required to use the purchased product two or three years down the road. The iPad worked perfectly fine for two or three years until Apple sends out an update that requires me to remember a password from years ago that, at the time, wasn't billed as the password to use the computer.

            I don't want an iPad with this level of security, and I did not buy an iPad with this level of security. Instead, it's been imposed upon me two or three years after the purchase and tied to a password that was never intended, either by me or Apple, to be the password that would be required to use the machine itself. Furthermore, Apple imposed it upon me with in an update without any notice that my tablet would have to be reauthorized with a long-forgotten, original password from years before.

            Maybe in the days to come my car and motorcycle will also be rendered inoperable by BMW with the reasoning that they've decided that I can no longer continue to use my car without reauthorizing its use by remembering the password to their spammy marketing account that was set up at the dealer when I bought the car. Seriously, this would never happen, but for whatever reason, people put up with this kind of intrusive, big brother crap from Apple.

            Comment


            • StudioMonkey
              StudioMonkey commented
              Editing a comment
              OK fair enough.

          • #7
            I had the same thing happen with my laptop macbook. When I bought it I did the email and security questions and they were so vague that I couldn't remember them and I didn't care for years as I didn't use the cloud or the itunes store. But when I bought a new laptop I told them they had to fix it and over ride the security questions and set me up again or I wouldn't buy the new laptop. They finally fixed it. What a nightmare.

            The control on computers is just crazy-making. I think the car is a fair analogy. It would be like all of a sudden the car just won't work anymore because the key won't be allowed to fit. Too bad time up! Buy a new one!

            Comment


            • PrintDriver
              PrintDriver commented
              Editing a comment
              How much of a nightmare is it if you LOSE your car key?

          • #8
            Before doing any update on any device, a lot of times it helps
            a. to read the More Details link
            b. to wait at least a month then read any feedback from those who have auto update set up.
            Not just with iOS, but ANY device.



            Comment


            • #9
              We have those computer-chip-activated keys for living spaces here. Yep, you can't just go make a spare - like car keys, the hardware store just won't do it. So, if you lose your house key... it's a good week before you can order/organize a replacement. This is extra awesome if you have any teenaged kids.
              Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

              Comment


              • #10
                I think one difference between the keys and my iPad is that there are ways to get new keys. It might be an inconvenient hassle, but it's doable. In my case, Apple is flat out refusing to help.

                Another difference is that right from the beginning, when obtaining keys, everyone understands that losing them means doors won't open and ignitions won't start. With the iPad, Apple changed the rules after three years in a way that now requires me to "reauthorize" the machine with an iCloud password that I no longer have and can no longer reset and that was never mentioned in the beginning as something that I would ever need to do.

                Comment


                • #11
                  B, when you set up your new Android tablet, can you let us know if it requires an email and password and maybe a Google account you'll never use.

                  Google owns Android. And you think Apple is bad?
                  Unless you don't use the tablet to connect to the intertoobs, I think you'll find them very much the same.
                  So far Google hasn't made any promises about Android being ''secure.''
                  That doesn't mean they won't do the same thing Apple did in the very near future.

                  I see on the internet that the iOS 9.3 update has a glitch causing this required log-in on older devices.
                  The immediate fix described though is actually knowing your iTunes account apple ID and password login.

                  https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT206203
                  Last edited by PrintDriver; 04-14-2016, 10:25 AM.

                  Comment


                  • B
                    B commented
                    Editing a comment
                    It's the iTunes/iCloud account that I no longer have a way of accessing, and have gotten by without just fine by using another iTunes account for various downloads -- until this past week when Apple changed the rules.

                    As for Google, we use them all the time here at work for all kinds of things, and I've grown quite comfortable with their various services. I've never liked the cumbersome and confusing iTunes / iCloud / App Store thing. I can't say that Google Play is a great improvement on it, but it's no worse. As for music, I'm perfectly willing to abandon any music purchased from iTunes. For me, Spotify has made Apple's music services totally irrelevant anyway.

                    I'm not going to give up my Mac anytime soon, but I'm definitely pulling myself out of the quicksand of Apple's (or anyone else's) ecosystem approach to everything.

                • #12
                  And in unrelated news; vinyl sales surged up 30% in 2015.

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    Just as a follow-up, I've been using my new Android-based Samsung Galaxy S2 tablet for the past few days. I'm happy to say that, so far, I'm really liking it.

                    To answer PrintDriver's question, yes, there's the usual passwords and email account needed to set up the tablet and to download apps from Google. Unlike my now bricked-by-Apple and totally useless iPad, however, there's a hard reset option on the Galaxy tablet that will wipe the device clean and restore it to the original factory settings for a new pristine activation, just in case I ever need to do that.
                    Last edited by B; 04-21-2016, 02:07 PM.

                    Comment


                    • PrintDriver
                      PrintDriver commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I bet you entered them right this time.
                      Because the functionality is important to you. This time.

                      Im guessing if you'd had to use a hard reset on the apple device you'd still be ticked off at the necessity of it.

                      I'm a Luddite pretty much. I expect things to go wrong with any sort of tech. I don't like the tracking all these devices do. Whats worse is if I didn't have a company supplied phone I wouldn't be able to afford one and find it darn hard to justify the expense. It's getting so you can't not have one though, and that's the part that really makes me sad.

                    • B
                      B commented
                      Editing a comment
                      It would have been annoying to be forced into a hard reset by a software upgrade, but unlike my laptop, there's really nothing on my tablet that couldn't be easily replaced or downloaded again. Far more annoying is Apple's new security-paranoid iOS policies turning my iPad into a $400 brick with no warning and no option whatsoever to reactivate it.

                  • #14
                    OK I was a late adopter too - not trusting the smartphone's tracking etc. Even a little worried about the signal frying my brain (lol I know now that the signal is too weak to have any effect). I still worry about tracking but you're being tracked anyway, whenever you pay by card, even walking down the street (cops using face recognition software on CCTV feeds) so what the hell. I got my first smartphone and it changed my life. I mean, the internet in your pocket !! I probably do more web searches than phone calls or texting or anything else.
                    Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

                    Comment


                    • B
                      B commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I sort of fit into this category too. I wasn't so much a late adopter as I was a reluctant adopter. I honestly don't like hauling a phone around with me, but my workplace insists on it. And I definitely don't like all the tracking and other features designed to share everything from location to web browsing habits. I mostly just deactivate all those kinds of things whenever possible and keep the phone turned off except to periodically check messages or make a call.

                      Unfortunately, it was this attitude of not buying into Apple's increasingly hyper-vigilant security, tracking and anti-theft policies that resulted in my iPad eventually getting bricked by Apple. Personally, I'd much rather depend on myself for keeping my phone, tablet and computer secure and out of the hands of thieves than having a self-appointed nanny of a computer company force their unwanted solutions down my throat.

                      If the contractor who built my house were like Apple, I'd arrive home one day, a couple of years later, only to find that they had dropped by and, without my knowledge or permission, placed a new set of locks on my doors and installed bars on my windows.

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