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  • Graphic Design in the 2010s...

    This is mostly a question for some of the students out there. Oldsters welcome to chime in.

    What do you see as the direction of Graphic Design these days as pertains to the following:
    Do you see yourself as a tech-literate computer user strictly working in a 2D production environment (either on paper or online)?
    Or do you see yourself as a hands-on designer working in the outside 3D environment (ie putting constructed graphics into a physical space)?
    How much of an exposure do you have to the latter while in school?

  • #2
    Back in dinosaur days, GD undergraduate course-work included classes in environmental design which required solving for implementation in 3D physical space. Yes, we would have to build it out.

    Paper and/or online design actually can involve a fair amount of 3D spatial ability, depending on your product/intent.

    Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm just kind of curious.
      I have been hearing on the NPR a lot about people not considering the ''trades'' any more and the push is for college education.
      I'm not convinced hand skills are become a thing of the past.
      Lately we have been having issues just getting production people, let alone welders or carpenters.
      It seems to be all about the internet now, though the good money there is on the backend side, not so much design.
      With even pre-schoolers getting attached to their mobile devices, I have to wonder where this is going to end up.

      Comment


      • PanToshi
        PanToshi commented
        Editing a comment
        drones & ai.

    • #4
      I think there's room for hand-on trades. I know several young guys (mostly guys for whatever reason), who weren't academic stars and didn't go to college, so they need a trade-type jobs. They all want to go into something sports or sales related though, it's like they aren't aware of anything else other than sports, and sales is just an easy thing to get into with promises of money.

      The problem is that so few companies are willing to train (except salespeople, they all want to train their sales people, which I guess explains how so many people with no experience ends up in sales). A lot of businesses want their applicants to walk in the door with experience and certifications. The trade industry is going to have to change their thinking by investing in their workforce if they want to grow it. I don't hire welders and carpenters, but if I did, I'd hire based on the candidates personality and motivation over experience get the right person in there. It's much easier to train a good employee than to coach a bad one.

      Anyhow that's my $.02. I don't know the answer to your original question though, PD.

      Comment


      • KitchWitch
        KitchWitch commented
        Editing a comment
        My husband is a welder. Before he went to school for it (though he had been welding since he was 12), he was lucky to see one job posting a week. Once he went to school and got six certifications, suddenly he was told about job posting websites that only certified graduates can access. That's where most of the legit job listing are. The employers don't want to bother with someone who hasn't been to school. Even with that, jobs are scarce. Most employers would rather get by with a skeleton crew full-time and hire temps when they get bogged down. Get caught up, fire the temps, save money.

    • #5
      To the original question about Graphic Design, I definitely see how that is all digital. Paper and printing unfortunately seem to be on there way out. To do graphic design you have to be able to design for print as well as web. Sadly, however, I have seen too many students that either haven't been taught (or at least ignored the teachings) about designing with production in mind; for example crops, bleeds, multi-ups and imposition.

      Considering the environment of how your design will be displayed is definitely important. Although, in regards to hands on design in an outdoor 3D environment, I see that more as landscaping, architecture or something of that nature. Designing signage would be graphic design related, but it would be construction, manufacturing, welding, etc. that would be actually constructing the 3D space.

      That being said, I do agree that these "hands on" trades are less emphasized in our economy than they need to be. It seems the majority of careers are all geared toward providing a service of some kind any more.

      Comment


      • #6
        Human creativity is the future. Everything else is algorithms to be automated. Physical labor gets automated by robotics. Mental labor gets automated by computing.

        Eventually creativity will be automated also. The last job a human will ever do will be to activate the A.I. machine that sees no further use for humans.

        Comment


        • #7
          Originally posted by graffiks View Post
          Paper and printing unfortunately seem to be on there way out.
          I'm going to have to disagree here. In my line of work, paper and printing are very decidedly not on their way out. That being said, I do not deal with small businesses or start-up entrepreneurs with small budgets. In the corporate arena, print still leads the brand which in turn leads the whole tomato.

          When was the last time you had a beer? Did it come wrapped in a screen?
          Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

          Comment


          • #8
            Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
            I have been hearing on the NPR a lot about people not considering the ''trades'' any more and the push is for college education.
            That's more about what 18-year olds ''think'' is cool. Funnily enough, that tradesman will likely earn more in the long run than the pixel pusher, depending on location, skill, market, expertise.
            Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

            Comment


            • #9
              Originally posted by KitchWitch View Post
              My husband is a welder. Before he went to school for it (though he had been welding since he was 12), he was lucky to see one job posting a week. Once he went to school and got six certifications, suddenly he was told about job posting websites that only certified graduates can access. That's where most of the legit job listing are. The employers don't want to bother with someone who hasn't been to school. Even with that, jobs are scarce. Most employers would rather get by with a skeleton crew full-time and hire temps when they get bogged down. Get caught up, fire the temps, save money.

              Oil industry, municipal works, metals, shipping, seafarer, garbage, recycling, green and/or grey infrastructure - shit, even the movie industry has need for these ''trade'' skills. Thing is, many don't want to move, work on an oil rig, or live below deck with 5-12 other guys to do it.
              Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

              Comment


              • KitchWitch
                KitchWitch commented
                Editing a comment
                You have a solid point. My husband has been offered nice jobs, but we'd have to move. Since I'm 17 years in my job (and primary earner) and his job history is sketchy (not *always* his fault, lol), we stay put.

            • #10
              Designing signage would be graphic design related, but it would be construction, manufacturing, welding, etc. that would be actually constructing the 3D space.
              This is actually exactly my point. Are graphic designers leaving the physical world behind because they view it as ''construction''?
              Is the physical world limited to simple wayfinding? Or is a graphically planned environment out of the question?
              What about the world of physical museums, not just the art museums but the science museums, the state aquariums, the historical preservations? Do they all get forgotten as avenues for graphic design because they are constructed environments? Young designers keep saying that print is dead. Will there ever come a time when they say they don't need to actually go to a place because they can view the contents online?

              Just waxing philosophical today. (Actually there is a method to my madness, but trying to stay on the lighter side of things...)

              Pan, you crack me up. Packaging is the leading reason print is not dead. Well that, and corporate annual reports and the government budget reports. LOL.

              Comment


              • #11
                Pan I probably did misspeak. I do see that there will probably always be a place for printing. I was speaking from my personal experience over the last 10 years of seeing business drop. I have always done much of the printing that both you and PrintDriver mentioned. I did Print-on-Demand printing for a number of years catering to the small businesses that were always pinching pennies. Staples were too expensive, and PowerPoint at home was the layout software of choice. Now I'm in the corporate world with reports and manuals that could easily be read on computer screens and tablets. That is the part I think will have a drop in volume as business become more paperless.

                As to the "graphically planned environment" PrintDriver mentioned, I see your point. I wouldn't have normally thought of that as a career choice for someone labeling themselves as a graphic designer. I definitely see how it relates, and maybe should be an option for those looking to go down that path. I just always saw it as interior design, landscape design, architecture and so on.

                Comment

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