Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Struggling to find clients!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Struggling to find clients!

    Hi guys,

    We have a new business offering services in different design fields including brand identity development, interior design, photography, promotion, etc.

    However, I have been trying to get clients through social media and other online platforms since I'm the business's "account manager" and somehow an introvert that find it difficult and scary to go out and meet clients and offer them our services.

    My question is:

    Are there any ways to get design clients other than going out and meeting them?
    And if meeting the clients in person is essential, could you give me some tips on approaching them and pitching them on our services?

    *Also, we want your opinion on our website design and structure: www.deblue.co

    Thanks

  • #2
    Hi Deblue and welcome to GDF.

    We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
    Shop smart. Shop S-Mart.

    Comment


    • #3
      Ever occur to you that you have the wrong job title?
      An account manager handles incoming accounts.
      The New Business manager drums up new business. And yes, they do have to go out and meet face to face at all kinds of venues from Chambers of Commerce meetings, to industry gatherings, to lunch meetings. There is no way you can do this from your desk. Especially if you offer interior design.

      Gonna let you in on a secret, social media and online platforms aren't the be-all end-all in marketing.

      And I'm pretty sure the GDF has a do-not-follow on posted websites....

      (at least it used to)

      Comment


      • #4
        The stock industry used to be an ideal place for us introverts, but that's in turmoil these days. I made a decent side-income, never had to interact with anyone, and money was automatically transferred to my bank account every two weeks.

        Where I live, new businesses are required to publish their contact information in a local newspaper. New businesses usually need start up services, including design. That's a good place to start.

        Again, locally, there are 'mixers' hosted by the local chamber of commerce and through organizations like meetup.com. These give you the chance to talk with other local businesses about your services in a low-pressure environment.

        When I started out, I developed a database of about 200 contacts in one particular niche industry with which I had experience, and a portfolio. I mailed out 3 postcards over the course of 3 months, offering a package deal on design services at my standard rate (which was a bit below average for my area... I was starting out after all) plus printing on 2500 postcards or brochures that were slightly below wholesale printing prices. The offer expired at the end of fiscal year, which was a few weeks away. I ended up getting 5 new clients out of the promotion, and they were good clients who kept coming back, and when they came back they paid full rate on printing. I didn't spend any time meeting with them or pitching them. They wanted the printing deal, but in the long term I got them as design clients.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
          Ever occur to you that you have the wrong job title?
          An account manager handles incoming accounts.
          The New Business manager drums up new business. And yes, they do have to go out and meet face to face at all kinds of venues from Chambers of Commerce meetings, to industry gatherings, to lunch meetings. There is no way you can do this from your desk. Especially if you offer interior design.

          Gonna let you in on a secret, social media and online platforms aren't the be-all end-all in marketing.

          And I'm pretty sure the GDF has a do-not-follow on posted websites....

          (at least it used to)

          Thanks for replying PrintDriver,

          Looking at the amount of your posts, I'm pretty sure you have a deep knowledge of the forum's policies 😉

          For the job title; where I work I manage incoming accounts in addition to acquiring new clients, so I guess that I should have a double-titled job title; whatever that means 😅

          Still, bringing in new clients is pretty tricky!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mojo View Post
            The stock industry used to be an ideal place for us introverts, but that's in turmoil these days. I made a decent side-income, never had to interact with anyone, and money was automatically transferred to my bank account every two weeks.

            Where I live, new businesses are required to publish their contact information in a local newspaper. New businesses usually need start up services, including design. That's a good place to start.

            Again, locally, there are 'mixers' hosted by the local chamber of commerce and through organizations like meetup.com. These give you the chance to talk with other local businesses about your services in a low-pressure environment.

            When I started out, I developed a database of about 200 contacts in one particular niche industry with which I had experience, and a portfolio. I mailed out 3 postcards over the course of 3 months, offering a package deal on design services at my standard rate (which was a bit below average for my area... I was starting out after all) plus printing on 2500 postcards or brochures that were slightly below wholesale printing prices. The offer expired at the end of fiscal year, which was a few weeks away. I ended up getting 5 new clients out of the promotion, and they were good clients who kept coming back, and when they came back they paid full rate on printing. I didn't spend any time meeting with them or pitching them. They wanted the printing deal, but in the long term I got them as design clients.
            Thanks for your help Mojo,

            I really liked your method. You must have been very patient and disciplined to acquire these clients.

            But, don't you think that the amount of clients you got is very little -(even if they are returning clients) - in accordance to the holy job you've done to have them?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by deblue View Post

              Thanks for your help Mojo,

              I really liked your method. You must have been very patient and disciplined to acquire these clients.

              But, don't you think that the amount of clients you got is very little -(even if they are returning clients) - in accordance to the holy job you've done to have them?
              For me, it was a great return on my investment. In the US, the Direct Mail Marketing Association estimates you can get a 2-4% response rate on a mailing like that. I was skeptical, and my response rate was a bit lower, but it still worked out great. I still have one of those clients 15 years later. They have regularly scheduled projects every quarter and they pay on time. Three years after I got them, they referred me to their neighbors who do the same kind of work... regularly scheduled projects every quarter and always paying on time. I've had them for 12 years. Those types of clients are golden. It cost me about a weeks worth of labor and a couple hundred dollars, but I picked up long term clients without having to do cold calls or traditional networking.

              Comment

              Search

              Collapse

              Sponsor

              Collapse

              Incredible Stock

              Latest Topics

              Collapse

              GDF A division of Mediabistro Holdings Adweek | Mediabistro | Clio | Film Expo Group Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy Copyright 2016 Mediabistro Holdings
              Working...
              X