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  • Some questions about the graphic designer job...

    Hello all!

    New to this forum, i have some questions a long time in my back of the head that i want to share...for self honesty....

    THIS QUESTIONS IS FOR THE PROFFESIONAL GRAPHICS HERE, I ALSO KNOW HOW TO CREATE GRAPHIC FROM SCRATCH...

    1. Is it ok to BUY pre-made graphics (vectors, template) and gathering and combined all together to create one graphic design? it is OK to call it YOUR creation? (for Self-honesty)...

    2. Can you BUY pre-made graphics, change it, add elements and sell it?

    3. If you got a work order (from a client), do u buy some graphics (background, vectors, shape) add something, and give it to the client? and you say to him that this is YOUR creation? (cause...really...like he going to check all the websites to look if you copy something...)

    Thanks, and BE HONEST.



  • #2
    The product you produce should be unique to the client purpose.
    It is ok to buy stock items and use them to create the unique solution to the clients' needs.
    It is not ok to say that the stock items are your creation.
    Why would you want to?
    As for using pre-created layouts you definitely can't say they are yours. If that is how you want to service your clients, there are other designers out there better than that and you can continue to deal with the bottom feeder clients who accept that quality.
    Have fun with that.

    Comment


    • #3
      Most every purchased design element, like an illustration, icon, template, etc, comes with an End User License Agreement (EULA) that spells out what the license allows you to legally do. Most would enable you to do what you described, but there are exceptions, so it's important to read through them because there can be limitations, like only for editorial use (no advertising) or never to be used as part of a logo, for example.

      So yes, it's typically OK, if it's within the EULA's limitations. Whether it's ethically right for the situation depends on the nature of the situation.

      Many clients -- especially those paying higher fees -- want original work. Other clients really don't care and are more concerned about saving money. For these clients, stock art can provide a quick way to give them something that works well within their budgets. Then there's the big gray area in between where you just need to use common sense and keep the client in the loop on what seems appropriate to mention. If you're doing work on a national ad campaign, you likely wouldn't be using downloaded clip art, but if you're putting together a quick weekly newspaper ad for the local tire store that's having a sale, it's another matter.

      Website templates are slightly different. When building a website in a content management system (CMS), there's no point whatsoever in reinventing the wheel for every project. Much underlying code can be repurposed, which is what many purchased and open-source templates and frameworks allow you to do. Change the visual aspects of the design as much as needed, but 90 percent of the underlying code might stay the same. There's typically not a reason to go out of one's way to get this approach pre-approved by most clients as long as they're happy with the end product. It might be compared to going to a restaurant and ordering vegetables -- you wouldn't typically ask the cook where he or she got them.

      There's really no such thing as totally original work. I mean, how often would you design your own typeface for an ad? Never, probably. If you need a photo of, say, kids eating hotdogs, would the client be happier to spend $40 on stock art or $4000 to hire a photographer and models? Again, it often depends on the nature of the job and the client's expectations.

      Whether or not it's all "your creation" is both relevant and irrelevant. What's always relevant is that you have an honest relationship with the client and that the end work meets the client needs. You never want to mislead your client by implying that you created something you didn't create, but again, this involves a dose of common sense. For example, I'll always tell a client if I'm suggesting stock photos to save money, but I'll never do that if I use a chunk of open-source JavaScript that I found in a tutorial. And of course, it's equally important that you haven't plagiarized and/or violated copyright laws, so always check those EULAs.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by B View Post
        Most every purchased design element, like an illustration, icon, template, etc, comes with an End User License Agreement (EULA) that spells out what the license allows you to legally do. Most would enable you to do what you described, but there are exceptions, so it's important to read through them because there can be limitations, like only for editorial use (no advertising) or never to be used as part of a logo, for example.

        So yes, it's typically OK, if it's within the EULA's limitations. Whether it's ethically right for the situation depends on the nature of the situation.

        Many clients -- especially those paying higher fees -- want original work. Other clients really don't care and are more concerned about saving money. For these clients, stock art can provide a quick way to give them something that works well within their budgets. Then there's the big gray area in between where you just need to use common sense and keep the client in the loop on what seems appropriate to mention. If you're doing work on a national ad campaign, you likely wouldn't be using downloaded clip art, but if you're putting together a quick weekly newspaper ad for the local tire store that's having a sale, it's another matter.

        Website templates are slightly different. When building a website in a content management system (CMS), there's no point whatsoever in reinventing the wheel for every project. Much underlying code can be repurposed, which is what many purchased and open-source templates and frameworks allow you to do. Change the visual aspects of the design as much as needed, but 90 percent of the underlying code might stay the same. There's typically not a reason to go out of one's way to get this approach pre-approved by most clients as long as they're happy with the end product. It might be compared to going to a restaurant and ordering vegetables -- you wouldn't typically ask the cook where he or she got them.

        There's really no such thing as totally original work. I mean, how often would you design your own typeface for an ad? Never, probably. If you need a photo of, say, kids eating hotdogs, would the client be happier to spend $40 on stock art or $4000 to hire a photographer and models? Again, it often depends on the nature of the job and the client's expectations.

        Whether or not it's all "your creation" is both relevant and irrelevant. What's always relevant is that you have an honest relationship with the client and that the end work meets the client needs. You never want to mislead your client by implying that you created something you didn't create, but again, this involves a dose of common sense. For example, I'll always tell a client if I'm suggesting stock photos to save money, but I'll never do that if I use a chunk of open-source JavaScript that I found in a tutorial. And of course, it's equally important that you haven't plagiarized and/or violated copyright laws, so always check those EULAs.
        Thanks for detail answer!

        I got to mention this, i know you can't call it YOUR creation, but if you combine all this elements you came up with something NEW...right?

        Again...i'm not talking on the legal issue here, or what to tell to the client...im talking about the creativity, the color mixing etc...

        For example can i put this combined elements in my portfolio? To show it to clients?

        Again...not about the legal issue...about honest with yourself...

        Look on the music industry for example...everybody takes samples from here and there and create NEW WHOLE THING, they BUY pre-made instruments (kick etc...) and combined it with their song.

        What you can say about that?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by kutu View Post
          For example can i put this combined elements in my portfolio? To show it to clients?...
          You seem to be expecting solid answers where few exist.

          In summary, though, it depends on the clients, their expectations, the legalities, the nature of the projects, and not misleading clients and potential clients about things that might be of concern to them. There are a few hard-and-fast rules regarding right and wrong in design, but there is a huge gulf of grayness that lies between them. What to do in that nebulous area is usually a matter of common sense, good intentions, transparency and the judgment that comes from experience.

          Just for example's sake, let's say a client hired you to create an infographic about, um, last year's product sales for a company newsletter. The infographic needed to include vector images of various things along with sales figures you got from the company. Unfortunately, the client didn't realize it would cost four figures and had only budgeted for three. A quick look on Shutterstock turned up an infographic package you could download for a few dollars that would supply many of the elements you needed. You head back to the client and say you've got a great solution that involves combining stock art with your original work along with text supplied by the company. He says, perfect. It turns out well. You get paid, and everything is good.

          So could this go in your portfolio? Of course it could. For that matter, it would provide you with a fantastic opportunity to tell potential clients and employers how you resourcefully put together a great solution on a shoestring budget that completely met the client's needs.

          Graphic design is not about your work. Graphic design is about using your skills to solve your clients' and employers' problems. Similarly, you shouldn't view your portfolio as just a means to show off how original and beautiful your artwork is. Instead, your portfolio is your chance to convince potential clients and employers that you have the skill and intelligence to successfully solve their most challenging communication problems.

          Originally posted by kutu View Post
          Look on the music industry for example...everybody takes samples from here and there and create NEW WHOLE THING, they BUY pre-made instruments (kick etc...) and combined it with their song.

          What you can say about that?
          I can say these people frequently get sued for copyright infringement and that "everybody" doesn't do that. I also thought you said you weren't talking "about the legal issues." Like it or not, though, legal issues are a huge deal. A sure-fire way for an up-and-coming designer to destroy his career would be getting his client sued and caught up in a public relations disaster over plagiarized work. For that matter, that client might very well sue the designer (or the designer's employer) into bankruptcy over it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Kutu and welcome to GDF.

            We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
            Shop smart. Shop S-Mart.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by B View Post

              In summary, though, it depends on the clients, their expectations, the legalities, the nature of the projects, and not misleading clients and potential clients about things that might be of concern to them. There are a few hard-and-fast rules regarding right and wrong in design, but there is a huge gulf of grayness that lies between them. What to do in that nebulous area is usually a matter of common sense, good intentions, transparency and the judgment that comes from experience.

              Just for example's sake, let's say a client hired you to create an infographic about, um, last year's product sales for a company newsletter. The infographic needed to include vector images of various things along with sales figures you got from the company. Unfortunately, the client didn't realize it would cost four figures and had only budgeted for three. A quick look on Shutterstock turned up an infographic package you could download for a few dollars that would supply many of the elements you needed. You head back to the client and say you've got a great solution that involves combining stock art with your original work along with text supplied by the company. He says, perfect. It turns out well. You get paid, and everything is good.

              So could this go in your portfolio? Of course it could. For that matter, it would provide you with a fantastic opportunity to tell potential clients and employers how you resourcefully put together a great solution on a shoestring budget that completely met the client's needs.

              Graphic design is not about your work. Graphic design is about using your skills to solve your clients' and employers' problems. Similarly, you shouldn't view your portfolio as just a means to show off how original and beautiful your artwork is. Instead, your portfolio is your chance to convince potential clients and employers that you have the skill and intelligence to successfully solve their most challenging communication problems.
              Thanks for great answer!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by KitchWitch View Post
                Hi Kutu and welcome to GDF.

                We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
                No problem, and thank you!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by kutu View Post
                  Hello all!

                  New to this forum, i have some questions a long time in my back of the head that i want to share...for self honesty....

                  THIS QUESTIONS IS FOR THE PROFFESIONAL GRAPHICS HERE, I ALSO KNOW HOW TO CREATE GRAPHIC FROM SCRATCH...

                  1. Is it ok to BUY pre-made graphics (vectors, template) and gathering and combined all together to create one graphic design? it is OK to call it YOUR creation? (for Self-honesty)...

                  2. Can you BUY pre-made graphics, change it, add elements and sell it?

                  3. If you got a work order (from a client), do u buy some graphics (background, vectors, shape) add something, and give it to the client? and you say to him that this is YOUR creation? (cause...really...like he going to check all the websites to look if you copy something...)

                  Thanks, and BE HONEST.

                  you can but a true graphic designer will not do this. when a man choose to be a graphic designer then it means he has own imagination that he wants to make it real.if i take or buy other's creation and tell my client that its mine then where is my creativity? you can decorate your purchased products and sell them but you don't have to tell a lie.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I hear what you saying man my first site i designed froom nothing to learn about coding , many other sites i have sold are spinoofs off teplates that i could reconstruct due to my coding ability.

                    If i where to design a new site for every client i would one charge a lot more than i do now and two spend a lot more time doing it.

                    Thing is humans like trends and say there is a trend going in web design right now , if you designed something with that trend in mind somewhere there is a template thats pretty much the same.......

                    Its a grey area many say its ok some look down on it. I always say to myself had this person found this template online would they be able to code it and change the elements to the exact way they asked me to to enahnce they brand with better visuals and interfaces? change the content and internal structure ( as templates more often than not have bad structure and bloated coding ) probably not.... That is what they are paying me for ...That helps me sleep better at night.

                    I like that clients where brought up because in the end that is the deciding factor for an original piece or a reconstructed template.

                    Although i would never copy anything like a logo or a banner . Im not saying some inspiration is wrong but that is something that needs to be unique as possible.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      About your music thing ( and here im going to contradict myself ) ... we still talk about jimi Hendrix and the Beatles today .... do you think 60 years from now we will remember taylor swift? no why because those guys where o.g they had passion that fot the art that is music and the difference between what they did and now it you could fel it in the music ( sorry i am a musician ) .

                      I guess if you want to be something new something unique that can stand the test of time , in design even , then you need that passion and intelligence to solve the design problem in a way that nobody else could.

                      Remember what we see as industry standards today in design where at one stage one of a kind unique solutions to a design need.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Clipping shop View Post
                        you can but a true graphic designer will not do this. when a man choose to be a graphic designer then it means he has own imagination that he wants to make it real.if i take or buy other's creation and tell my client that its mine then where is my creativity?
                        The profession of graphic design is not about expressing one's imagination or creativity. People wanting their careers to center around personal expression might be better off choosing to become painters or sculptors than designers.

                        Graphic design is about solving visual communication problems for clients — on time and within budget. Imagination and creativity, as important as they might be, are just tools in a designer's toolbox.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.

                          We are on the basis of predecessors to create something new

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi Arvin and welcome to GDF.

                            We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
                            Shop smart. Shop S-Mart.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by B View Post

                              The profession of graphic design is not about expressing one's imagination or creativity. People wanting their careers to center around personal expression might be better off choosing to become painters or sculptors than designers.

                              Graphic design is about solving visual communication problems for clients — on time and within budget. Imagination and creativity, as important as they might be, are just tools in a designer's toolbox.
                              Yes i understand. thank you for clarifying .

                              Comment

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