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  • <b>
    Comment on Please help with company logo
    <b>
    One of the big "Ah Ha!" moments in art or design school is when the whole concept of negative space kicks in, along with the realization that it's been hiding in plain sight for years without...
    Today, 09:45 PM
  • Staisman
    Comment on Please help with company logo
    Staisman
    What exactly do you mean by the negative and the positive shapes? As I said before I am not a professional. This is my first use of the Illustrator and a logo creation. Well don't count my old one that...
    Today, 09:25 PM
  • Staisman
    Reply to Please help with company logo
    Staisman
    Is it a good or a bad thing ? -...
    Today, 09:22 PM
  • Designia
    Reply to Envelope Printing
    Designia
    Why because you didn't like what you were told?
    Today, 09:22 PM
  • <b>
    Reply to Please help with company logo
    <b>
    Okay, you took all my points and ran with them.

    Your solution isn't exactly what I would have done, but then again, it shouldn't be. You might want to experiment around a bit more to refine...
    Today, 09:09 PM
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  • Idiot client? Help?

    After three days of waiting for an explaination as to WHY the logos I submitted in this thread: http://www.graphicdesignforum.com/fo...ad.php?t=19932
    do not "excite him" this is what he wants...

    He wants it to look like a photo. He wants to see leaves in the trees. The last one in that thread is closer to what he is looking for, but he wants the acorns to have ALL the detail they can.

    Initially, he told me he wanted it to BE a photo, and I explained why logos can't be photos. He tells me there's some technology now where a photo can be made HUGE like that, I explained all about vector and raster but I don't think he gets it. (I think he thought there is technology that makes a photo into a vector image - I know nothing of it, doesn't mean it doesn't exist, but the RAM needed for such a conversion would be enormous).

    What he wants too, is for there to be 2 logos then, if I insist upon making a logo that holds water as JUST black and white, he wants one with the photorealistic detail in full color.

    He actually thought I should work backwards - do the logos in color first and then in black and white. Um, no. HE also saw no reason for the logo to ever be in black and white - I said this is a campaign that will be at least 5 years running - is he sure that the logo will never be faxed on letterhead, will never run in a black and white newspaper ad?

    Help? I'm not sure how to approach this, without sounding like I am the most unhelpful person on the planet.
    Last edited by greyghost; 09-11-2006, 10:22 AM.
    it's deadline and I'm GROUCHY.

  • #2
    is he on about 'live trace' in illy?
    you could trace it to look photoish without compromising on size?
    The beginning is always today.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think I missed that thread. Those are all awesome concepts, each captured the request aptly.

      Maybe Captain's suggestion is it...give that a go.

      All the best!
      Purity and simplicity... and ubuntu.

      If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor. If an elephant has its foot on the tail of a mouse and you say that you are neutral, the mouse will not appreciate your neutrality.
      - Bishop Desmond Tutu

      Comment


      • #4
        You could always show him your college degree and resume, then tell him since he came to you for your professional experience and expertise, that he should trust your judgement, on how "things" should/do work in the design field.
        pas·sion
        If there is no passion in your life, then have you already lived? Find your passion, whatever it may be. Become it, and let it become you, and you will find great things happen for you, to you, and because of you.
        -T. Alan Armstrong

        Comment


        • #5
          ^I wouldn't do that if I were you.^

          Do the two logos. Either make the Photorealistic one extremely high res or do the trace like everyone says.

          Comment


          • #6
            BUT THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS RIGHT BECUZ THEY PAY THE BILLZ LOLZ!!!


            I don't know what more to tell him. If a photo-like logo ever needs to get reproduced in B/W for any reason, like mass produced envelopes on the cheap or whatever, it's going to look like crap. Honestly, you could honor his requests but in the long run is it something you want to be associated with?

            Comment


            • #7
              I would do the photo one too. Take a photo into ps, adjust the contrast, drop out the background, run a gaussian blur of about 1 on it then adjust the threshhold. It will look like a warhol style photo. Create a path off of it and then bring it into illustrator! I bet it'll look nice!! I like all of the logos you have created, but I'll admit that none of them particularly excite me either. I think you just need to take them up a notch to the next level!!
              You're no longer a child when a mud puddle is an obstacle rather than an opportunity!

              Comment


              • #8
                Well, I've continued to think on it too - no I don't want it to look like mud because there is too much detail in it. It cannot be entirely photorealistic, but I think maybe there is a happy medium - where the black and white version is basically the silohuette of the color version... or maybe just a simpler version of the color... see what I can do with the live trace deal.

                I'm very much the simple type in nearly everything I design. I like clean edges. I like boxy stuff. I admit that. The logos in my portfolio reflect that.

                I think, if I add some roughedged Nike-like space orbit swooshes in the background of the last one, change the shape of the last one so it isn't so square, and use a more exciting font... maybe that will do it for him? Add a second acorn, and give the acorns some depth with some shadowing inside them, and do the same for the trees... would it be too much? Would adding "grass dots" be too much?
                it's deadline and I'm GROUCHY.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Here's an example of the technique I was talking about. I think it could work in this instance. This logo was made off of a photo of a bottle cap, turned it grayscale and then ran threshhold on it. It's a great way to get a vector logo off of a photograph, if you ask me.

                  You're no longer a child when a mud puddle is an obstacle rather than an opportunity!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cornfed
                    Here's an example of the technique I was talking about. I think it could work in this instance. This logo was made off of a photo of a bottle cap, turned it grayscale and then ran threshhold on it. It's a great way to get a vector logo off of a photograph, if you ask me.

                    Wow, that looks cool!
                    I've done things like live trace for things like trees, birds, things I needed a silhouette for - cutting out background, adjusting everything, then making it JUST the tree... so same concept but with more than just a tree.
                    it's deadline and I'm GROUCHY.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PrintDriver
                      ^I wouldn't do that if I were you.^

                      Do the two logos. Either make the Photorealistic one extremely high res or do the trace like everyone says.
                      Why? Customer is always right? Retail, yes. But for a client/job? not always, and they know this.

                      They may pay the bills, but again they wouldn't have came to you for your professional advice/expertise/experience. So stand up for yourself. If they came to you they should listen to you, and understand your advice. If not they could have went to some kid (maybe their kid?) with a pre-built, cs2 installed Dell/Mac.

                      hi-jack/

                      Guess thats the difference, I dont like to be walked on, nor ignored. I had this happen to me on Thursday in class. He (teacher) was bent on that he was right for a measurement on a piece of mounting board.. He was trying to get people to cut 13-1/3". Um... there isnt a 1/3" on a scale/ruler/tape measure. After looking at his math, I got irritated because he wouldnt listen to me. So I showed him an easier way and a more "correct way" for proper measuring.

                      /hijack

                      Its alot more professional standing up for your professional/educated/experience opinion, than to be walked on and ignored.

                      You can put this in another perspective, say you go to a doctor, get a diagnosis, they tell you (insert diagnosis and treatment), you dont like what they have to say, so you go to another doctor they tell you the same thing, you get frustrated, then decide to take care of it yourself (bad mistake), somethings you should just listen to and accept.

                      Sorry thats just the way I am.
                      pas·sion
                      If there is no passion in your life, then have you already lived? Find your passion, whatever it may be. Become it, and let it become you, and you will find great things happen for you, to you, and because of you.
                      -T. Alan Armstrong

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        HOW you correct a client is everything.

                        For example, when he wanted a cute squirrel added into the logo, I suggested it may not be a good idea if this is meant to be a fundraiser targeted at businesspeople. My first reaction is "ew I hate cutesey stuff and don't do it" - I found a good, logical reason WHY it probably wasn't in his best interest.

                        Or when he wanted me to use MS clipart stuff. Not OMG, you have to trust me I can't use that crap... but being professional. Explaining why, not just a reactionary "I have a degree, I have X experience."

                        So, since I had already softly rejected some of his suggestions, it isn't fair to not at least entertain how to put more detail in, without sacrificing things TOO much. Mostly, I am seeking the happy medium, which may not exist in this case because other artists may feel what I wind up doing is too much and he may not feel like it's enough. BUT... I have to try.
                        it's deadline and I'm GROUCHY.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What I meant is Tact is what's needed, not a defiant stand on your diploma/certificate.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Perhaps ask your client to pick out a handful of logos they like. doesn't have to be in teh same field but cane be. Once you see what they like, work with those in mind and see what you get. I had a client (well still do) who said he wanted his logo deep red. he also showed me a mock up but it was aweful. but he stressed Red. after doing a few logo renditions, he came back with another direction and again said red. But he honed in on an old-fashioned look and so I went from there to give him a logoo with an old-fashioned look and made one of the colors (of a two-color job) red. At the start he didn't like the looks but didn't say he wanted old-fashioned until later and it isn't what he invisioned but after getting more feedback found out his liking. I like to ask people whatt logos/websites they like when designing for them since they might not be able to tell you what they really want but when you have an idea of what they like to see, you can take it from there.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BJMRGTIVR6
                              Perhaps ask your client to pick out a handful of logos they like. doesn't have to be in teh same field but cane be. Once you see what they like, work with those in mind and see what you get. I had a client (well still do) who said he wanted his logo deep red. he also showed me a mock up but it was aweful. but he stressed Red. after doing a few logo renditions, he came back with another direction and again said red. But he honed in on an old-fashioned look and so I went from there to give him a logoo with an old-fashioned look and made one of the colors (of a two-color job) red. At the start he didn't like the looks but didn't say he wanted old-fashioned until later and it isn't what he invisioned but after getting more feedback found out his liking. I like to ask people whatt logos/websites they like when designing for them since they might not be able to tell you what they really want but when you have an idea of what they like to see, you can take it from there.
                              I actually asked this of him on Friday, when he said none of the logos excited him. But he has yet to do that, instead he came back with a PILE of clipart from Google and Microsoft...

                              For someone who claimed to have done this many times before with some of the largest firms in the area... he's pretty clueless.
                              it's deadline and I'm GROUCHY.

                              Comment

                               
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