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  • Education Question

    Umm, I new here so if this is posted in the wrong place Im sorry. I was wondering which was better to have. A Bachelors or an Associates Degree? I start at AI Online in October. Is there a big enough salary difference that having a bachelors over an associates would be better? Also, will an associates hold me down in the future or will my portfolio, assuming that its good, makes up for the difference? I would really appreciate any help that anyone has on the subject. Thanks!!!!!!!


    I forgot to put that the Salary statistics that i found for Alaska, show very little difference between an associates and bachelors degree. Sorry about that.
    Last edited by Star_gazer_289; 09-17-2006, 05:14 AM.

  • #2
    I'm graduating on Wednesday from an AI campus with a BA Anyway, yes, I'd go for the Bachelor degree. I'm seeing a lot of design positions where it's required. An associates won't get you as glamorous of jobs, unless of course your portfolio is out of this world amazing.

    Good luck!
    I will grow old but I will never grow up.

    Comment


    • #3
      And what would be your reason for staying with an Associates, and not getting a Bachelors? Can't afford the loan? Can't afford to stay out of the workforce any longer, while you study?

      Of course, if you care about your future, you should get the highest degree you can (a Masters if plausible!), and you'd better have a really good, practical reason why not, if you don't.

      That said, you do make your own future! A lower education is never a roadblock for somebody with true heart and passion for what they do, and a real desire to learn, grow, and succeed.

      I personally come from the lower-education team, but I didn't go to school young. I went back as a mature adult, with adult bills and an adult lifestyle to maintain. My previous job was substantially better paid than what I make now, but I was burned out. Still am, I guess.

      You can make your future as you choose, but I am really curious what your reason would be for wanting to quit early in school, and highly doubt the reason will be good. Why make life harder on yourself?

      PS - Congratulations, Michellle!! I'm sure it's been a long road, but worthwhile, no?
      Ned Yeung, A.C.E.
      mediamainline.com
      cyclopsphoto.ca

      Comment


      • #4
        Heck yeah.

        Star_gazer--I'm curious why you've chosen AiO over site classes. IME the classes on campus are MUCH better than the ones online. But then again, not everyone has a campus within daily driving distance.
        I will grow old but I will never grow up.

        Comment


        • #5
          Oh, I didn't notice that part of the post, Shelle. I would also ask the same thing.

          I know at least one graphic designer in Alaska. Would you like me to put her in touch with you, to suggest any good schools there?
          Ned Yeung, A.C.E.
          mediamainline.com
          cyclopsphoto.ca

          Comment


          • #6
            I think Graphic design is one of the best examples of a career where your portfolio matters more than your education. There are plenty of awesome self taught designers out there making big bucks. Im currently thinking of going back to school to finish my B.A. I'm beginning to think that Graphic Design B.A.'s from 4 year university's like state schools are pretty much a waste of money. I got a much better design education in 2 years from my local J.C after attending a State University for 3 years. (thats primarily because the J.C. I went to was one of the best and well funded in the country) I feel that most non-art focused schools lack a lot of important elements of design (that I am now understanding) I am pretty much decided that an art institute is the way to go. Like Chicago, or Parson's New School, SF Acadamy of Art looks pretty good too. I just found Full Sail's website, www.fullsail.com. Lots of awards, lots of graduates on high profile jobs. Im pretty Impressed, this just might be where I finish my B.A

            So, I guess, a B.A will look good on paper, but its how much you learned that really matters.
            "To be is to do" --Socrates.
            "To do is to be" --Jean-Paul Sartre.
            "Do be do be do" --Frank Sinatra

            .

            Comment


            • #7
              Never heard of an associates degree, but I'm guessing it's like what we call a certificate here in New Zealand. Is an associate degree 1 year as opposed to the 3 or 4 years of a bachelor?

              If so, then I recommend the Bachelor. Our certificates don't equip you with enough knowledge to go on your merry way unless you are SUPER motivated to do it yourself. If so, what is the point of a certificate in the first place?

              Either you teach yourself, or you get yourself a full qualification.
              It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Ned
                Oh, I didn't notice that part of the post, Shelle. I would also ask the same thing.

                I know at least one graphic designer in Alaska. Would you like me to put her in touch with you, to suggest any good schools there?
                There really aren't many options here. I think if you need to physically stay in AK an online program is not a bad option.

                A bachelor's is the better way to go, if a job requires a degree that's what they're likely looking for. Probably a good idea to become familiar with job postings and even to call or email a couple of places (i.e. ad agencies, design studios, etc.) to ask them. When I was fresh out of college I was surprised who took the time to talk to me and even write me personally -- big names from big city agencies even.
                You can fool some of the people all the time, and those are the ones you want to concentrate on. --GWB

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by EC
                  When I was fresh out of college I was surprised who took the time to talk to me and even write me personally -- big names from big city agencies even.
                  You are lucky. When I was fresh out of college most places wouldn't even interview unless I had at least 2 years working experience. Or do you mean just "talking" but not offering you jobs?

                  Degree or no degree, experience is still pretty important.
                  It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by budafist
                    You are lucky. When I was fresh out of college most places wouldn't even interview unless I had at least 2 years working experience. Or do you mean just "talking" but not offering you jobs?

                    Degree or no degree, experience is still pretty important.
                    Yes I just mean talking. I sent out about 5 billion resumes, too, and got some really nice letters back as well (undoubtedly the heavy lifting done by admin assistants but still, not form letters, they were written for me -- I was shocked, actually). The older I get the more I learn that people will give their time to people just starting out. They may not interview you, or give you a job, but they may take a phone call or answer an email to give you some pointers. I know I've done this for many people that have emailed me. And plus, look at this forum. Even old pros like to give back, information is cheap and easy to give, and actually can be very flattering to the person you're asking.

                    So if I had to do it over again, I'd call up a few important people and say "hey I'm just about to start school, wondered if I could ask you two or three questions?" What are they gonna say, no?
                    You can fool some of the people all the time, and those are the ones you want to concentrate on. --GWB

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I don't really agree with the 'go all out and get a Masters degree'. I can't say I know many designers with one - unless they are teaching- and then the Masters is in Education. A Bachelors and a good portfolio AND 2 years plus actual work experience will get your toe in the door. Just your toe. It's up to you to persue until you drop.

                      As for pay scale, it's more about your ability than your degree. Associates or Bachelors, where the degree isn't rigidly specified, it all comes down to your book and field experience.

                      I'd highly suggest trying to find any kind of production internship you can to get started on that experience.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by EC
                        Yes I just mean talking. I sent out about 5 billion resumes, too, and got some really nice letters back as well (undoubtedly the heavy lifting done by admin assistants but still, not form letters, they were written for me -- I was shocked, actually). The older I get the more I learn that people will give their time to people just starting out. They may not interview you, or give you a job, but they may take a phone call or answer an email to give you some pointers. I know I've done this for many people that have emailed me. And plus, look at this forum. Even old pros like to give back, information is cheap and easy to give, and actually can be very flattering to the person you're asking.

                        So if I had to do it over again, I'd call up a few important people and say "hey I'm just about to start school, wondered if I could ask you two or three questions?" What are they gonna say, no?
                        Oh yes, that makes more sense then. Actually we've only just set up our website this year and I've been gettting people through our site that are asking me questions too. I will always take the time to respond, but maybe that's coz I'm bored with not too much to do!
                        It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by shellebelle
                          Heck yeah.

                          Star_gazer--I'm curious why you've chosen AiO over site classes. IME the classes on campus are MUCH better than the ones online. But then again, not everyone has a campus within daily driving distance.

                          Im starting AIO online in October and then transferring to the Art Institute of Philapdelphia in February.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Cool.
                            Ned Yeung, A.C.E.
                            mediamainline.com
                            cyclopsphoto.ca

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ned
                              And what would be your reason for staying with an Associates, and not getting a Bachelors? Can't afford the loan? Can't afford to stay out of the workforce any longer, while you study?

                              Of course, if you care about your future, you should get the highest degree you can (a Masters if plausible!), and you'd better have a really good, practical reason why not, if you don't.

                              That said, you do make your own future! A lower education is never a roadblock for somebody with true heart and passion for what they do, and a real desire to learn, grow, and succeed.

                              I personally come from the lower-education team, but I didn't go to school young. I went back as a mature adult, with adult bills and an adult lifestyle to maintain. My previous job was substantially better paid than what I make now, but I was burned out. Still am, I guess.

                              You can make your future as you choose, but I am really curious what your reason would be for wanting to quit early in school, and highly doubt the reason will be good. Why make life harder on yourself?

                              PS - Congratulations, Michellle!! I'm sure it's been a long road, but worthwhile, no?

                              Im not quitting early, in response to that I would like you to know that I graduated from high school early. And yes the loans are a little intimidating considering that In Alaska my starting money for an associates would be the same as a bachelors. And the difference in loans would be about $30,000 to $40,000. I was considering starting with my associates degree and then continuing with my bachelors. Im glad that you made it from where you were. There is no good reason for quitting since I wouldn't be quitting. And by the way if I care about my future I will attain my dream and you don't have to have the masters degree to do that. I could make way more money doing mechanics than I could doing Graphic Design but I enjoy Design and Im willing to take a lower salary to acheive what I want.

                              Thanks

                              Comment

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