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  • Crowdsourcing Logo website?

    Hi everyone,

    I was considering trying to crowdsource a logo design. I have never done it before, but I heard a presenter at an entrepreneurship conference talk about their good experiences.

    When I looked online the most popular ones seem to be 99designs and crowdspring.

    I was wondering what the design community thinks of these? Do you all think they are good website, and if you do, which one is your favorite?

    Thanks everyone.
    Last edited by garricks; 05-29-2010, 10:52 PM. Reason: spec work links removed.

  • #2
    Ken, for the most part you'lll find the members of this forum against crowdsourcing. You're asking a lot of people to put in time working, when only one will be paid for the work.

    Try reading this link: http://www.no-spec.com/
    This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
    "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

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    • #3
      I do no like crowd sourcing.

      Graphic design should be a natural process and open communication between client and designer. Clients should choose designers based on their strong portfolio. Crowd sourcing ignores a designer's portfolio, disregards the time spent on solutions and does not consult the client or their target market. How can you design a good logo without proper consultation?! You can't!

      Giving a client many solutions to choose from takes all responsibility away from the designer/s and puts it into a client's non educated hands. What criteria do clients choose logos by? Do they know anything about readibility, industry, print specification, colour theory etc? Probably not. That's what they hire a designer to know.

      Crowd sourcing is also unfair in its compensation for designers. Therefore you may find that many crowd source designers are those that don't mind not being paid. They might be hobbyists or people that have a lot of time on their hands that they don't need to be paid for some jobs.

      A designer's hourly rate is worked out to be what they need to earn in order to survive. Crowd sourcing ignores a designer's hourly rate. I'll take a stab and say that a good designer will not apply to crowd sourcing websites. A good designer knows they can receive compensation for every job they do. Therefore you will not find good designers at crowd sourcing websites.
      It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

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      • #4
        Ken, I think it's great that you care enough to ask those in the industry their opinion.

        For the record, I'm against it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JMV Design View Post
          Ken, I think it's great that you care enough to ask those in the industry their opinion.

          For the record, I'm against it.
          Agreed.

          Crowdsourcing for a logo is like saying that McDonalds makes the best burger in the world.
          Professional Pixel Pusher Designing the world around you. | Working daily to reach 10,000 hours of practice.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JMV Design View Post
            Ken, I think it's great that you care enough to ask those in the industry their opinion.

            For the record, I'm against it.

            Yeah its great to hear someone actually ask designers about this.

            Those sites are not a good thing, it leads to bad designs that don't work and brings down the whole industry in my opinion. Its sites like those that make it hard for good designers to prove their worth to the uneducated.

            As Budafist said, you probably won't find good designers on those sites anyways... more so students, hobbyists and would-be-if-they-could-be's.

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            • #7
              this is the first i heard of this.. i want to say i am against spec work, so i would be against crowdsourcing. i agree that most designers on crowdsourcing websites are mediocre.. but i browsed 99designs just now and i did see some good looking logos. just saying.
              good progammers write good code; great programmers steal great code

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              • #8
                There are nice looking designs on there sure, but my problem with them is how relevant they are to the company - is it targeting their target market, are the colours suitable, will it reproduce for every medium it is to be used for, is it memorable, does it stand out from their competition.... or is it just something the designer thought looked pretty.

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                • #9
                  i know exactly what you mean craig.
                  good progammers write good code; great programmers steal great code

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                  • #10
                    And how legal would it be.

                    Most crowdsourcing I've seen use a lot of clip art or remade logos (copy of other people's work) or done in such a way that you'd end up hiring a designer to recreate it anyway so that it would print.

                    AND if they used clip art you wouldn't be able to trademark it, or have any copyright or any rights to it all. Or even, have a heck of a fight if you got something that was copied.

                    Jade

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                    • #11
                      speaking of, i was googling copyright infringement and whatnot and i came across this website

                      thelogofactory.com/logo-design-articles/logo-design-contests/


                      well i didnt read it but i skimmed thru it, and if you look at the images you get the general idea i think. it shows a lot of submitted logos were actually copied/stolen from other logos.
                      good progammers write good code; great programmers steal great code

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                      • #12
                        I was going to say what Drazan and KWS said. The number of cases where crowdsourcing "creatives" steal stock art or other designer's logos is high enough that it would behoove a company to not take the risk of getting a cease-and-desist letter or a big bill from the legal copyright holder, especially if the company's branding has been developed around the stolen logo.

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                        • #13
                          I find it funny that people devalue logos and their company identity. I hear all the time, "What about start up companies and small businesses? They don't have a lot of money". Well, I've seen so many businesses that have no problem justifying outrageous overpriced rent and furniture and things like that, but they can't spend money on something that will become the face of their company?

                          It's ridiculous.

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                          • #14
                            You do have to admit that even some freelance designers can't design a proper logo either.
                            There is an art to logo design that compliments the custom service a company should expect for their logo. The requirements have been dumbed down recently, almost too far.

                            A logo doesn't have to be plain dull boring, good in black and white or for any production process. It has to work. Period. It used to be that making a logo design involved doing at least: spot color, 4-color, black and white and 'logo on colored background'. Now it's down to just one iteration and forget including a standards manual.

                            There was someone on here earlier who was arguing with another designer on another forum over the use of gradients and raster effects. You can use those things to pimp a logo as long as you have another iteration that works when you can't use them. There is no use in arguing it anymore. To me, it's all about the signage. If you want your pretty pimped logo on a sign and all I can do is print it (assuming the resolution is there), you will have one boring flat sign just like the hundreds of others in your general vicinity.

                            But considering that all logos will soon be just plain circles with skinny-assed text inside them....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post

                              To me, it's all about the signage. If you want your pretty pimped logo on a sign and all I can do is print it (assuming the resolution is there), you will have one boring flat sign just like the hundreds of others in your general vicinity.

                              But considering that all logos will soon be just plain circles with skinny-assed text inside them....
                              Somehow I doubt that graphicsgranny4567 will be available to help when PD tell them there is no way to print the logo either.

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