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  • DanCMU
    Reply to [ Logo Critique ] Period or not at the end of the tagline?
    DanCMU
    The period, to me, makes it more of an assertion rather than a suggestion. I know that's not what that's used for (technically speaking) but it makes it pack a little more punch.

    I vote to...
    Today, 11:03 AM
  • PrintDriver
    Reply to Dissertation topic
    PrintDriver
    What's a selfie?
    Just kidding.
    Narcissistic for the most part, more fleeting than a hashtag in general, and somehow people think they can make social statements with them. Society has become...
    Today, 10:48 AM
  • <b>
    Reply to How to choose a scanner?
    <b>
    I agree, the Canoscan is a good scanner -- especially for the price. I've bought a couple of Epson Perfection V700 Photo Scanners for work, and would do so again if they're still made. They've been very...
    Today, 03:54 AM
  • PanToshi
    Reply to [ Logo Critique ] Period or not at the end of the tagline?
    PanToshi
    Adding my vote for keeping it.
    Today, 03:31 AM
  • PanToshi
    Reply to Glad to Be Here Now!
    PanToshi
    Welcome to GDF Tess

    We ask all new members to read the very important links here and here. These explain the rules and how the forum runs. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every...
    Today, 02:44 AM
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  • #16
    Group projects have also taught the extroverted slacker/idiots that they can leach credit from the hardworking introverts.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by <b> View Post
      Group projects should be banned from educational curriculums except as first-hand demonstrations of how committees usually fail at what they're tasked to do.
      I'm pretty sure the only reason group projects are in curriculums is because it's a "few birds, one stone" approach to grading for the instructor.

      <instructor to a class of 25>Now everybody in get in groups of five</instructor to a class of 25>
      <really saying> I'm cutting my workload by 80% so I can cut out for a few pints</really saying>
      Last edited by kemingMatters; 03-20-2012, 07:28 PM.
      Design is not decoration.

      Comment


      • #18
        Totally agree with <b> and Bob's posts.

        The group projects I had in school were the most frustrating, time wasting experiences I had as a student. The only thing I learned was that students can't lead student groups. You need someone with experience to take the helm. Also, students don't have the balls to tell each other they're wrong or need to do something different - they were incapable leaders, which means unless the instructor intervenes, the project is screwed at the first sign of trouble. I'm not saying there's anything wrong with being nice, but in a group environment, somebody needs to have the capacity of standing up and leading the group when things get tough. In my experience, students can't do that - I'm not sure if they should be expected to or not either.

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        • #19
          It's an unreasonable expectation. They're emulating work colleagues, but most are stuck as, more than anything else -- social peers. And it's a reflection of how our cultures define and 'reward' leadership. Often placing social likability far above real skills, credentials or measurable performance in terms of value to the organization or project goal.

          Then why do so many teachers love and assign it?

          Makes for an easier marking work load would be my main guess.
          Last edited by Bob; 03-20-2012, 07:34 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by kemingMatters View Post
            I'm pretty sure the only reason group projects are in curriculums is because it's a "few birds, one stone" approach to grading for the instructor.

            <instructor to a class of 25>Now everybody in get in groups of five</instructor to a class of 25>
            <really saying> I'm cutting my workload by 80% so I can cut out for a few pints</really saying>
            I'd *like* to think that a professor/instructor won't simply give a blanket grade to a given group, but will give individual grades based on how each person performed within the group. This may be difficult for some projects if most or all of the work was done outside the classroom, but any teacher worth his weight in salt will meet with each group as the project progresses and observe who's actually doing work and who's leeching off their peers. I know, I know... in a perfect world and all...
            ___________
            Burn the land and boil the sea, you can't take the sky from me.

            blog/portfolio

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            • #21
              On every group project I had in college, we had to write a peer review on each other's participation, and attitude towards the project in general.
              "I used to wonder what friendship could be, Until you all shared its magic with me." - Jesus Christ

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              • #22
                I'm reading Susan Cain's book that's on the bestseller list right now called Quiet. It's a book about introverts and the dynamics of being introverted in a society dominated by extroverts.

                There are entire chapters in it mostly slamming the trend in education toward group projects. There are other chapters about the inefficiencies of meetings and committees that provide platforms for extroverts to talk and promote their ideas while the introverts quietly just get their work done. In the end, the extroverts, because of their expansive personalities, often end up taking credit for whatever work the introverts manage to get done despite the incompetence of the extrovert-dominated committee.

                Before the book was released, The New York Times published an article by Cain titled The Rise of New Groupthink. I definitely recommend reading this article.

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                • #23
                  That's funny <b> because I was thinking of Susan Cain when I wrote a lot of these responses. Here's a nice little video about the subject of intro/extrovert on TED:
                  http://tinyurl.com/75fgpyt

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Obsidian86 View Post
                    On every group project I had in college, we had to write a peer review on each other's participation, and attitude towards the project in general.
                    ...a lesson in office politics suddenly appears...

                    Peer review is moot if friendship (alliances) exists and/or the manager/instructor bears no witness to the workings of the group.
                    Last edited by kemingMatters; 03-20-2012, 08:25 PM.
                    Design is not decoration.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      It seems like most of the lessons learned in group projects (politics, taking credit for others work/not getting credit for your work, unfair grading, committees suck, and so on), although important lessons, they seem more along the lines of what you quickly learn in the real world than what you typically learn in an academic setting.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I had a person kicked out of a group one time in college. They failed. Period. but we had to take it up with academic board or some shit before our instructor would do it.

                        The thing is I sometimes say that those people would be fired if it was a real work situation. But I've been in work situations where the 'team' I had to work with was so pathetic I just did it all And in the end someone almost always notices. That is how you get promotions and move forward in my opinion. You take charge when you need to. Or you do your own thing and turn it in independently (if you are more introverted). For me sitting back and watching the horror unfold has only caused me to loose credibility and integrity for not stepping in to resolve the situation.
                        I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not. ~ Kurt Cobain

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I've just finished reading the book East of Eden by John Steinbeck and was going through my highlights. This is one of them and made me think of this thread.

                          Originally posted by East of Eden
                          Our species is the only creative species, and it has only one creative instrument, the individual mind and spirit of a man. Nothing was ever created by two men. There are no good collaborations, whether in music, in art, in poetry, in mathematics, in philosophy. Once the miracle of creation has taken place, the group can build and extend it, but the group never invents anything. The preciousness lies in the lonely mind of a man.
                          I think there can be good collaborations, but school projects aren't one of them.
                          It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

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                          • #28
                            And yet... collaboration is the essence what work, and society is built on. Maybe. When you think about it. While looking out the window at another brain-meltingly long production meeting... ooh, a bluejay!

                            Comment

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