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  • neeru_m
    Reply to Need help with logo
    neeru_m
    Thanks Amit for your suggestions. I'll try to improve my logo...
    Today, 04:22 AM
  • AmitMan
    Reply to Music album cover
    AmitMan
    I like the grunge style here. Its a little hard to read at times, especially with the white text on black.

    Nice work, keep up the good stuff!
    Today, 03:29 AM
  • AmitMan
    Reply to Need help with logo
    AmitMan
    I think I see what your trying to do with the underline, but I don't think its working in this case. A simple underline can help to add distance between a title and say a headline and can also make the...
    Today, 03:25 AM
  • AmitMan
    Reply to :::-----What's the graphic standards logo ------:::
    AmitMan
    I've heard of checklists and similar documents used for say ensuring your file is print ready (ensuring all digital images are at least 300dpi, file formats are corrects, appropriate bleeds etc.) but...
    Today, 03:11 AM
  • neeru_m
    Reply to Need help with logo
    neeru_m
    Sorry I just forget to mention. Its a Graphic and Web Design company logo. And the major symbol is a combination of "D" and "L" which is the first letter of company name "Design...
    Today, 02:57 AM
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  • #16
    Yes - I do anything and everything. Fix the printer, file purchase orders, chase down clients, talk to printer (I like that part), pack stuff for shipping, load up trucks for big events, hang posters, be a tour guide, install vinyl graphics, photography (usually portraits & events), order promotional materials (frisbees, pens, that kinda crap), write copy and design all kinds of stuff like postcards, brochures, catalogs, magazine ads, billboards, and so on.

    I have mixed feelings about some of it, but I really don't mind it for the most part. I'm sure I'd become a better designer if all I did was design, design, design all day, but it's kind of fun that every day is a different experience. My bosses are happy with the designs I produce, and like that I pitch in with everything else.

    Comment


    • #17
      I've been hired under the express outline of only so much in the scope of work expected.
      And I was lied to and cheated out of compensation after the fact, the carrot and the stick.
      The fake out or the bait and swirch whatever you want to call it good jobs are scarce so I took the offer on thier word.

      Oh and yes you are expected to be more than just a graphic designer , me;
      Graphic designer
      Marketing research and tracking
      Marketing coordinator
      Web developer
      Multimedia and presentation graphics
      Architectural Illustrator
      Model maker
      Presentation graphics
      Photography
      Proposal writing
      Copy editing
      more when the need arises .....
      "After all is said and done, more is said than done."
      Aesop

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      • #18
        Originally posted by AlwaysLearning View Post
        Lil looked at me and said, "No, MOM. She was an Artist. Not a Graphic Designer. She DREW things with pencils and paint and stuff."



        OUCH! Though sometimes I can't say that I disagree with her. I've seen some work that made me think, "Those who can, do. Those who can't become graphic designers." lol. I saw a printed design from one of my coworkers recently that almost gave me an aneurysm. I couldn't believe someone didn't keep it from going to press. It's amazing how some people buy a Mac and think that's all it takes to qualify them as an "artist."

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        • #19
          I get bored if I'm doing the same thing all the time, so the variety usually works for me. And it's definitely helped my resume and portfolio.

          It doesn't work when they pull you off jobs to do these non-related tasks and then suddenly act surprised when you miss a deadline. It also becomes frustrating when the higher ups don't understand the difference between certain workflows. It can take you less than 10 minutes to make 25 changes to a print job, but it's not going to take you 10 minutes to make 25 changes to a video file that takes an hour just to render.

          Viewing graphic design as less than specialized is definitely a factor. Even kids can create websites, music videos, custom animation, collaged photos, and sell sheets using Word. So, to some degree, you won't get any respect as a graphic designer unless you also offer some more specialized skill.

          That's why I'm getting into e-book publishing and interactive media design. Publishing iPad and Kindle issues is still a relatively new area with some major growth potential. I don't know if it's just my experience, but it seems like the majority of my peer "designers" are very reluctant to embrace new technology and learn new skills. They are happy with the status quo. I think you would have to be insane to have that kind of attitude or hire anyone who thinks like that in this kind of job market. And I think those are the skills designers should be encouraged to acquire in whatever free time they have, rather than using them to stuff envelopes.

          Though, I can't remember too many times I've refused to do weirdo tasks. The most memorable was when I was asked to assemble and fluff Christmas trees at a trade show. That inspired a very heartfelt, "Oh, hell no! There's no way you're getting me to do that!" That's also what I will say if anyone ever asks me to clean up anything that was once an interal body fluid.

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          • #20
            The answer to your question depends on several things.
            • Is your graphic design time being billed out per project to other departments in your corporation?
            • If so, is the time billed supposed to cover the costs of your department?
            • Is your graphic design department a one man operation?

            If, as you say, you are asked to deal with clients, generate design concepts, and deal with reproduction problems you are in a position to gain a wealth of experience. You are functioning at a much higher level than the average designer. Ask questions and maintain a positive attitude. If you are doing all of these tasks and you find some of them are cutting into your creative time, I believe you have a good reason to ask for some assistance.

            You might keep a daily log of your time, listing the the various tasks you have to do to keep the work moving. Put down the project the work relates to, the type of work and the amount of time spent. If you do have to approach management on this issue, you will have documentation.

            I have spent 42 years as a graphic designer, illustrator, studio owner and eventually as an art director for a large corporation. From experience, I can sat that some of the things you mention are just part of the business.
            http://www.paulsullivanstudio.com

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            • #21
              Originally posted by RayEl View Post
              Though, I can't remember too many times I've refused to do weirdo tasks. The most memorable was when I was asked to assemble and fluff Christmas trees at a trade show. That inspired a very heartfelt, "Oh, hell no! There's no way you're getting me to do that!" That's also what I will say if anyone ever asks me to clean up anything that was once an interal body fluid.
              "fluffing" a Christmas tree... sounds dirty... especially with your "Oh, hell no! There's no way you're getting me to do that!" response...
              Design is not decoration.

              Comment


              • #22
                Yesterday I was 'recruited' to inflate about 150 (very quickly) of these for an event:



                My boss reasoned that as a 'singer', I would be good at this.

                She was right. No problem.

                Had an unexpected urge for salami afterwards though.

                Comment


                • #23
                  If you work in a small company, they're not going to hire 8 or 9 people if 1 person can do the job. If you can't handle the graphic design work on top of the other stuff, say so. Make a suggestion.

                  If you are really too busy to do the other stuff, then it is better business sense to keep you working design full time. But if you don't have enough work to keep you busy for 40 hours a week, then be grateful you get to wear different hats rather than get your hours cut.

                  I'm the senior pre-press and designer here and I have no problem with doing other tasks if I'm not too busy with my own work. I'm being paid by the hour. If there's something that needs to be done. I don't expect that someone else be hired to do it while I sit and twiddle my thumbs.

                  There are lots of jobs that a company can outsource. But every job that you can inhouse will save you money.
                  It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by kemingMatters View Post
                    "fluffing" a Christmas tree... sounds dirty... especially with your "Oh, hell no! There's no way you're getting me to do that!" response...
                    Nope. It wasn't a task of ill repute. Well... at least not in the sense you might be thinking. lol. I was raised a Jehovah's Witness, so, because of the potentially dubious origin of the Christmas tree, asking me to help decorate 30 of them presented somewhat of a HUGE conflict of interest.



                    Originally posted by Buda View Post
                    There are lots of jobs that a company can outsource. But every job that you can inhouse will save you money.
                    I don't necessarily think it's always cheaper to keep a job in-house than to hire an experienced contractor. I saw a company learn that the hard way when they decided to have an in-house art director create their website because she claimed she had experience and they didn't want the expense of hiring an outsider to do it. After two years, still no functioning website. It became clear that her claimed experience was extremely exaggerated. Her final product was a site that wound up having to be completely redesigned from the ground up by someone else. The time and money spent waiting for her to figure it out could have been put to better use by hiring a professional freelancer to knock out a website in a few weeks. That's where it becomes vitally important to recognize the distinction between the various marketing disciplines and to understand that sometimes being a print designer (or art director) with some free time is not all it takes to make someone an effective web designer. Sometimes you need to bite the bullet, open the checkbook, and hire a pro to get something done right the first time.

                    Comment

                     
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