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  • #16
    Originally posted by seamas View Post
    Here is the full april 1940 issue/

    http://boyslife.org/wayback/#issue=NInzClriBQcC
    In addition to the great cover of your dad, I especially enjoyed the Goodyear Hog Scrapper Belt ad. How the hair on a pig's back is scrapped off without ripping open its hide is important stuff for all boys to know.

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    • #17
      By that time in 1939, my Dad was already in the USN for almost two years, and about to be stationed at Pearl Harbor. He was there during the attack.
      "I love deadlines. I love the 'whooshing' sound they make when they go by." - Doug Adams
      LinkedIn

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      • #18
        Originally posted by <b> View Post
        In addition to the great cover of your dad, I especially enjoyed the Goodyear Hog Scrapper Belt ad. How the hair on a pig's back is scrapped off without ripping open its hide is important stuff for all boys to know.

        I particularly like that one too.

        I'm totally checking out the ones my brother and I would get from the late '70s
        I totally wanted to sign up for the Junior Sales Club of America--I'd get the tent, and the bike, and the walkie talkie.


        I remember wanting the Sears sneakers advertized in the June '77 issue.
        Heresy is a victimless crime.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by seamas View Post
          Well, he couldn't get drafted --he was signed up in ROTC and then the USN all during the war--I'm not quite sure when he flunked his flight test--probably '44 or so. He was on an officer's track so they had him in college and training at the same time.
          I think by the time the Navy had him where they wanted him the war ended.

          He never set foot on a ship (while in the service), and spent part of the war on a Navy base in Oklahoma.

          Naval base in Oklahoma just sounds too funny.


          We (kids) suspect dad got laid a lot.


          That makes sense, being on the officer track and therefore not just getting plunked on a ship somewhere. I guess I didn't think that through when I said "draft" since he was already signed up.

          Naval base in Oklahoma does sound pretty funny.

          The testing part kinda makes me think of my father-in-law during Vietnam. He had originally thought about training as a helicopter pilot for the Army, took the written test and finished just a couple points shy of the qualifying score. A couple months later they came back around, "We sure could use some more helicopter pilots, and as luck would have it, your score is good enough now!" By then he'd already signed up for the Navy, which he figures was probably for the best rather than being a second-rate replacement chopper pilot.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by seamas View Post
            Well, he couldn't get drafted --he was signed up in ROTC and then the USN all during the war--I'm not quite sure when he flunked his flight test--probably '44 or so. He was on an officer's track so they had him in college and training at the same time.
            I think by the time the Navy had him where they wanted him the war ended.

            He never set foot on a ship (while in the service), and spent part of the war on a Navy base in Oklahoma.

            Naval base in Oklahoma just sounds too funny.


            We (kids) suspect dad got laid a lot.
            Not only in Oklahoma, but also in Kansas. The first house I bought when I lived in KS was one of a dozen officers' quarters that had been moved 20 miles up the road from the Naval base, back in the early 60's. Just a tiny little thing. The only difference in the houses is that some were mirror images of the others.

            Oklahoma also housed a number of German POWs during WWII. They were put to work in the fields and some in the oil fields to help replace our men who were in the Armed Forces. Some came back to settle here after the war.
            "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."--Benjamin Franklin, 1759

            The USA will not survive without another revolution. Soon.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by artistsdad View Post
              Oklahoma also housed a number of German POWs during WWII.
              My dad used to tell me about German POWs who worked in the sugar beet fields near where I grew up in rural Utah. They weren't particularly well-guarded and were frequently seen in town talking with the locals while accompanied by casual escorts. A few actually stayed after the war.

              Some sixty miles away, out in the desert where my grandfather wintered his sheep, was a concentration camp called Topaz. Topaz housed several hundred American citizens from the West Coast who were forcibly relocated there during the war for no other reason than unfounded suspicions related to their Japanese ancestry.

              It seems inconceivable today, but in some ways, second- and third-generation Japanese-American citizens were less trusted than genuine German military prisoners.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by <b> View Post
                My dad used to tell me about German POWs who worked in the sugar beet fields near where I grew up in rural Utah. They weren't particularly well-guarded and were frequently seen in town talking with the locals while accompanied by casual escorts. A few actually stayed after the war.

                Some sixty miles away, out in the desert where my grandfather wintered his sheep, was a concentration camp called Topaz. Topaz housed several hundred American citizens from the West Coast who were forcibly relocated there during the war for no other reason than unfounded suspicions related to their Japanese ancestry.

                It seems inconceivable today, but in some ways, second- and third-generation Japanese-American citizens were less trusted than genuine German military prisoners.
                Beale AFB still has some solitary confinement cells that were used by German POW's, and they have preserved the artwork and graffiti the German's left behind.

                The greater mistrust by the public of Japan back then had a lot to do with the way we were brought into WWII. They old surprise attack without a declaration of war. The fact we now know shows that wasn't the way it was supposed to be, but that's what the public knew at the time. Then the stories of the Bataan Death March, etc came to light, and you can take it from there. Thankfully the 442 Regiment showed how wrong the public was.
                "I love deadlines. I love the 'whooshing' sound they make when they go by." - Doug Adams
                LinkedIn

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                • #23
                  My future (now ex) step dad got busted carrying a bunch of cocaine around 1970. They gave him the choice of prison or join the army and go to Vietnam. He decided to join the army and they ended up sending him to Germany for two years instead. While there he shipped a Harley back (in pieces which he assembled in the garage after him and my mom got hitched. Pieces began falling off on it's maiden voyage and he just left it by the side of the road), several guns and various other army paraphernalia. He also used to wrap hash in tinfoil bundles, bake those bundles into the center of loaves of banana bread and ship those in the same crates he used for the other stuff.

                  Not sure how much of that you can get away with now days. One of my friends is on his fifth (I think) tour, now in Afghanistan, and he doesn't have a bunch of stuff. That I know of anyway.
                  I feel like a city kid who has stumbled into a town

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Gromit801
                    The greater mistrust by the public of Japan back then had a lot to do with the way we were brought into WWII....
                    Yes, without actually having lived through that time, it's difficult to fully appreciate or judge the motivations. I wonder what will be said 70 years from now about us and some of the things that, given the benefit of hindsight, society will have decided were misguided.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Lith View Post
                      My future (now ex) step dad got busted carrying a bunch of cocaine around 1970. They gave him the choice of prison or join the army and go to Vietnam. He decided to join the army and they ended up sending him to Germany for two years instead. While there he shipped a Harley back (in pieces which he assembled in the garage after him and my mom got hitched. Pieces began falling off on it's maiden voyage and he just left it by the side of the road), several guns and various other army paraphernalia. He also used to wrap hash in tinfoil bundles, bake those bundles into the center of loaves of banana bread and ship those in the same crates he used for the other stuff.

                      Not sure how much of that you can get away with now days. One of my friends is on his fifth (I think) tour, now in Afghanistan, and he doesn't have a bunch of stuff. That I know of anyway.

                      A friend of mine used to pilot C130 transport planes.
                      One story he told was of some other pilot buying a brand new BMW or Mercedes while in Germany--he got a great deal on it, and since they were due to fly an empty plane back to the USA, he put the car in the plane so to bring it home.
                      Somewhere mid-Atlantic was a call from a higher-up saying that there had better NOT be any unsanctioned cargo--with a threat of general discharge.
                      So the pilot had to dump the car into the Ocean.

                      Unsure if it is true or just a story that the Generals tell the pilots.
                      Heresy is a victimless crime.

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                      • #26
                        mmmmmmm banana bread hash

                        "There's something about turning the pages of a book or magazine and the felling of rubbing your hands across the words."

                        This is my pen tool. There are many like it, but this one is MINE. My pen tool is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. My pen tool without me is useless. Without my pen tool, I am useless.

                        there is no grey area when it comes to 1 color logos.

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