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  • 12.7mm

    Adobe InDesign has automatic margins set to 12.7mm, which is half an inch.
    Do you guys change these settings on this or keep it in 12.7? Is there any specific reasoning for this, apart from the countries that use inches and making it easier for them? Because dealing with things like 12.7mm is not the easiest task.

    Then again, this may all add up when plotting grids, so just wondering if you do design with grids, what measurement do you stick to? Different artwork would require different margins, but generally, you would probably still mainly stick to one.
    Last edited by shurik; 05-09-2012, 04:09 AM.

  • #2
    While I don't really mess with the default document, I have set a number of presets in the FILE > NEW > DOCUMENT… dialog box, to make it faster to hit the ground running. They aren't really templates, they just set the values in the New Document dialog.
    This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
    "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

    Comment


    • #3
      It is 12.7mm when it's in milimeters. But most of InDesigns measurements were actually built on Pica and Points for it's units.

      You can change any default setting in InDesign by making the change in the Preferences, or any Panel, with no documents open. This does not affect any documents that you have previously saved - only for new documents going forward.


      Where 12.7mm "or 3p" is the default - it is by no means the only thing you can have. Each document would ideally have different margins, perhaps more space on the bottom and top for footers and headers. Or more space on the inside of pages perhaps for call outs or side notes.


      You need to think carefully about how your document will be laid out. Usually drawing thumbnails first and deciding "well my content would suit this better" and then drawing that thumbnail as a full page would suit - before you even touch InDesign.


      There are some basic rules to page layout and what are key decisions in deciding your margins for printed or even online documents.


      I think you should familiarise with the basics of Page Layout Margins (which there are plenty of online articles, as well as printed books).


      The main killer I see with new people to InDesign is that they need to resize their publication AFTER it's laid out. Which can be a tedious.


      I suggest you ALWAYS speak to your printer about page size and margins BEFORE you even think about starting in inDesign.

      Always draw up MOCK THUMBNAILS and MOCK working size - using pencil and paper.



      I also think you should familiarise yourself with InDesign -

      (there are Version titles depending on what version of InDesign you are working on)
      http://www.amazon.com/InDesign-CS4-M.../dp/0321573579
      http://www.amazon.com/Real-World-Ado.../dp/0321592433
      http://www.amazon.com/Adobe-InDesign.../dp/032160606X

      "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

      Comment


      • #4
        Some good tips here on page layout
        http://desktoppub.about.com/cs/pagel...ct_margins.htm

        "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

        Comment


        • #5
          I change the margins all the time depending on the job. Smaller for business cards, larger for brochures and flyers. Even more for posters.

          I will add this (although I hope you know this already): The margins are only guidelines. They don't affect the printed piece.

          As for grids, I always work in points and picas. Just makes things easier. And, that's how I was taught 20+ years ago, so it just sort of stuck with me.
          http://brokenspokedesign.com

          Comment


          • #6
            It's defiinitely easier to work out words per line, lines per page and measure width and depth working in Picas than in millimeters.

            I was thought the classic way of hand drawing all templates, precisely with a type gauge, and hand lettering the headline text.

            We weren't even allowed anywhere near a computer until we knew exactly what font, what size, what leading, where images were going and what size etc.

            Everything was hand drafted, and your computerised version was compared to your original hand drawn markup when it was graded.


            Insert whatever looks good.


            Cosmo - did you ever do this for page guides?




            Doesn't matter what Page Size you work with - the Red Guides are the guides. And the Green lines are for the text frame.


            Works no matter what page size you use.

            "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by hank_scorpio View Post
              It's defiinitely easier to work out words per line, lines per page and measure width and depth working in Picas than in millimeters.

              I was thought the classic way of hand drawing all templates, precisely with a type gauge, and hand lettering the headline text.

              We weren't even allowed anywhere near a computer until we knew exactly what font, what size, what leading, where images were going and what size etc.

              Everything was hand drafted, and your computerised version was compared to your original hand drawn markup when it was graded.


              Insert whatever looks good.


              Cosmo - did you ever do this for page guides?




              Doesn't matter what Page Size you work with - the Red Guides are the guides. And the Green lines are for the text frame.


              Works no matter what page size you use.
              Yes. I remember those. Haven't done it in a long time though...
              http://brokenspokedesign.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Cosmo View Post
                As for grids, I always work in points and picas. Just makes things easier. And, that's how I was taught 20+ years ago, so it just sort of stuck with me.
                Same here.

                See also the Van de Graaf Canon.
                This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
                "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ah yes - believe this comes up a fair bit.

                  http://www.graphicdesignforum.com/fo...e+construction

                  http://www.graphicdesignforum.com/fo...e+construction

                  http://www.graphicdesignforum.com/fo...e+construction


                  Surfpark has some good links there

                  "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Got to admit, I don't start with a hand-drawn layout first, straight into InDesign. Sometimes I do draw things up, but mainly for layout ideas, not precise measurements.

                    So does anyone actually work in mm and cm? Working with picas and inches isn't easy for me, was never taught what they even mean, mm and cm just comes natural. It does get annoying, since most of the programs are automatically in inches, etc.

                    I do know about the golden ratio, etc. I am currently designing lots of forms, credit applications, etc. Those usually sit right in the middle of the page with minimum margins, so you can fit as much as you can on the page. So for this layout, I started making up a grid and thought whether or not it's best to change the margins from 12.7 to something more user-friendly :-)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you've never done the hand-drawn layout, that is precise, then I encourage you to do so. It's a good exercise and will give you a greater insight into your layout, margins, point sizes etc. before you even start.

                      I'm not saying you do it for every project, but where time permits and you have time to experiment.

                      I very rarely start with hand-drawn layouts anymore. But certainly when I started as an apprentice, one of my tasks was to read the job bags coming in, and provide thumbnail sketches to the people that would actually work on the layout.

                      It was cool, they'd follow my thumbnail sketches as much as possible, perhaps change one or two things along the way. But it was all a good learning experience in layout.


                      You have much more freedom with a pen and pencil than you do with a computer program.

                      "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

                      Comment

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