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  • B
    Reply to Logo for a supplement company
    B
    I'm thinking that tagging a supplement product with the initials BS might not be the best marketing strategy.
    Today, 06:36 AM
  • vaprarts
    Reply to Logo for a supplement company
    vaprarts
    I feel the colors seperate the image losing the dumbell look from being the instant thought.. I think you would have better luck if you made the weights be different sizes. I feel this would show a dumbell...
    Today, 03:58 AM
  • vaprarts
    Reply to Logo motorcycle magazine
    vaprarts
    I am somewhat in your target audience. I ride, i enjoy cafe racers, ive even heard of the company and been on their site once or twice. The thing about cafe racers are they believe "less is more"...
    Today, 03:52 AM
  • hrs.lidra
    Reply to Can you comment and critique my portfolio
    hrs.lidra
    thanks for the suggestion momoshy, i do use black transparrent BG, so it should be readable, but i think im going to make it more visible. Are you a webdesigner either?...
    Today, 03:37 AM
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    Reply to hyperlinking multiple images with php
    skribe
    Your welcome! What you are doing is one way I learned php. I wanted to be able to make Wordpress do more, so I started experimenting, and reading through the both the Wordpress functions reference, and...
    Today, 12:38 AM
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  • I get crap art from customers on a daily basis and I almost always have to recreate. I only kick it back if its too complex for me to do in a short time and/or if the customer is unwilling to pay our recreation fee.
    “The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level we created them.” Albert Einstein

    Comment


    • Ever cleanup a real crappy customer supplied file and get flack back from the customer for doing so? It happens. The other very common scenario is something like, "Um... when you booked your ad, we supplied you with clear specs and the dimensions specifically mentioned that the space was for a vertical ad. The file you just sent is horizontal."

      And how many times have you heard the follow-through: "Can't you just squeeze it into the space? It's digital, right?"

      Comment


      • My issues are always with the customer either not having vector art or having really bad vector art.
        “The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level we created them.” Albert Einstein

        Comment


        • Mmm. Vectors. And not the kind that you pour into a bowl in the morning either.

          'Really Bad Vector Art' might make a good band name.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Bob View Post
            Ever cleanup a real crappy customer supplied file and get flack back from the customer for doing so? It happens.
            Rarely because no job is begun until we take a look at the file the customer is providing. If it's a digital mess, the quote includes time for clean up or recreation and the customer is made aware of it from the get go. Cha-ching!

            Most are cooperative already either by knowing it's uncooked or specifically needs our professional touch to get it even remotely print ready. Some storm out in a huff, take the files to other places, get the same response then come crawling back with a 'you were right' look on their faces.

            If their gelatinous brains allow, they may even learn a lesson or two and hire a real graphic artist to build their files from that point on. One can only hope...

            Comment


            • If their gelatinous brains allow, they may even learn a lesson or two and hire a real graphic artist to build their files from that point on. One can only hope...
              And if the client is a 'real' graphic artist???

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Brie View Post
                My issues are always with the customer either not having vector art or having really bad vector art.
                ahh yes, deal with this daily as well. gotta love the promotional industry!

                "There's something about turning the pages of a book or magazine and the felling of rubbing your hands across the words."

                This is my pen tool. There are many like it, but this one is MINE. My pen tool is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. My pen tool without me is useless. Without my pen tool, I am useless.

                there is no grey area when it comes to 1 color logos.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
                  And if the client is a 'real' graphic artist???
                  Then we all hold hands and sing kumbaya in the art department and rejoice in the fact that there is still hope for our profession yet.

                  The designers who provide 'no worries' files are the ones that make our jobs that much easier. They take pride in understanding that there are multiple steps and variables, AFTER the artwork is created, in the reproduction process that if not addressed at the creation stage, can turn even the most award winning piece into a shop rag or a used napkin. I don't hesitate recommending said designer to clients for future work. Success though can only be achieved if the client understands why.

                  Comment


                  • [QUOTE=Bob;960528]Ever cleanup a real crappy customer supplied file and get flack back from the customer for doing so? It happens. The other very common scenario is something like, "Um... when you booked your ad, we supplied you with clear specs and the dimensions specifically mentioned that the space was for a vertical ad. The file you just sent is horizontal."

                    Not once have I taken flack for cleaning up a file, I always speak to the client before altering a file and then send them a the revised proof to sign off on before I proceed any further with it.

                    We do get people who commit to a vertical size and then send a horizontal size quite often, if it's early enough we tweak the layout of the editorial, but it is a PITA.

                    Originally posted by Bob View Post
                    And how many times have you heard the follow-through: "Can't you just squeeze it into the space? It's digital, right?"
                    I just send them a proof of what they are proposing on a mocked up page, they usually get the point after they see their model go from 6' tall with a 30" waist to 30" tall with a 6' waist.
                    Design is not decoration.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Brie View Post
                      My issues are always with the customer either not having vector art or having really bad vector art.
                      Worse yet, a low res jpeg or gif made in PS, and them saved as an eps from PS, and voila they think, here's your eps file.
                      "I love deadlines. I love the 'whooshing' sound they make when they go by." - Doug Adams
                      LinkedIn

                      Comment


                      • Then we all hold hands and sing kumbaya in the art department and rejoice in the fact that there is still hope for our profession yet.
                        I think you misunderstood...What if it's the 'real' designer sending the bloody mess of a file is what I meant.

                        Comment


                        • I love this forum! The bad thing is that I can't get any work done because I'm so interested in reading all the informative threads. I REALLY wanna go to PD's design school and was drooling at all the cool classes!!
                          I will say that I always make sure my contact info is on all my stuff so printers can contact me directly with any problems that might arise. I don't want my clients to deal with it, as I charge enough that they shouldn't have to. PD, I also agree with you that most of us don't want the clients or jobs posted on crowd sourcing sites. I've found that there is plenty of business out there for good work in my local area. Most small businesses here are eager to have a real person show up in their office who is interested in their business and is eager to give them real service. For those who feel that my prices are too high, I'm happy for them to get the kid down the street to do their work, because cheap clients like that are PITA's totally and can make my life miserable.

                          Comment


                          • BTW does anyone else here charge a pita premium when they think a client will be one in particular? You know, the ones who just go on and on like blowhards in the initial meeting, so that you just know every time you talk to them it's gonna take hours to get through all their bs and boasting. I just go ahead and quote them a higher price right from the get-go

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
                              I think you misunderstood...What if it's the 'real' designer sending the bloody mess of a file is what I meant.
                              I think I was swept up into a little graphic euphoria for a moment there PD.

                              I cut a little slack to the veteran adobe pro designers who, without knowing what the file is going to be used for (it does happen) and ends up being some 10 color simulated process or decal screen print for which I have to do color separations with, it's not all their fault that they provided a straight CMYK psd file or a 10,000 layered vector file. Sometimes it's just a minor thing that can be corrected in minutes. But I do expect them, or their boss, to know (or ask) what different substrates their piece will be reproduced on. That way the designer can contact the printer or color separator for a primer.

                              If it's gonna take a little time to get it to the point I need to start with, I'll explain what I need and because they're top shelf (and usually quick), they'll happily make the changes. Within reason of course.

                              There's probably more to it but did that make sense?

                              Comment


                              • Perfect sense justdrawit. A top-shelf designer who's been around the block usually only has to be reminded once, maybe twice. And with all the stuff we can print on nowadays (and more importantly, the stuff we can't) it is imperative that they keep on top of it.

                                Which reminds me, I have to get a print done using a 1/2" 'non-glare' acrylic face so I can show people what that reeeeeeaally looks like, just to be sure they reeeeeeeaallly want it.

                                Comment

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