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  • brochures

    Can someone help me out? im looking for the order of hierarchy when designing brochures. I have to do one for my portfolio class, and quite honestly Ive never designed a brochure before.

  • #2
    Originally posted by infinity View Post
    I'm looking for the order of hierarchy when designing brochures. I have to do one for my portfolio class, and quite honestly Ive never designed a brochure before.
    I've probably designed several hundred brochures over the last 30 years, and I've never heard of such a thing an order of hierarchy for brochures. Nearly every kind of communication that consists of more than a simple sentence is organized into a hierarchy that contributes to its understandability, but there's no formula, if that's what you're looking for.

    Comment


    • #3
      so then it doesnt matter what information is placed where? as long as the order makes sense? I figured brochures were laid out with their info in order of how the viewer typically reads, being as we read left to right, I wasn't sure if there was a "universal" way that brochures are typically "read through" if that makes sense.

      Ive always been intimidated by there being typically three columns, but then you have the front and back sides of the paper. Ive never been sure if all three columns, and both sides are supposed to be filled, or if it just depends on the amount of info being put into it

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      • #4
        Do you mean just a bi-fold piece of paper or like a brochure brochure magazine type thing?

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        • #5
          Well, in graphic design, all rules are made to be broken by the designers who can think of better ways of doing things. As for brochures, it's mostly just a matter of common sense.

          Some brochures are tri-folds, some fold vertically, some fold horizontally, some are parallel folded, some are gate folded. I just finished up a 16-panel accordion folded brochure a week or so ago.

          Put yourself in the reader's position, and decide how you would open the brochure, what you would look at first, how you would expect it to be organized, then organize your brochure like that. All brochures have a front and back cover, so about the only rule of thumb I can think of is to put something catchy on the cover, and put the mundane stuff, like addresses, logos and phone numbers on the back (but even that's not really a rule as much as it's a convention waiting to be broken).

          Organizing the information (the writing) so that it logically flows is just as important, but that's another subject.

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          • #6
            The brochure im doing for class, and its for a client/family member, is a tri-fold

            Ok thanks b that actually helped a lot, i need to get ahold of some brochures and see what they look like.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by infinity View Post
              i need to get ahold of some brochures and see what they look like.
              Great idea. <b>'s giving you great advice as well.

              IMHO, subject, logo, and contact information should be on the front & back panels. The other four panels contain the details. Based on the content, of course.
              This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
              "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

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              • #8
                Originally posted by <b> View Post
                Organizing the information (the writing) so that it logically flows is just as important, but that's another subject.
                Personally, I think it's most important to start there. The reading order, the visual hierarchy, layout, colours, fonts, photos, styles, treatments -- they all tie into the ideas and structure found (hopefully) in the writing.

                Understand what's written and support communicating it to the reader with design.

                Of course, if the copy sucks... which it often does.... time to rewrite or plug your nose. I've seen many great-looking pieces with crappy writing that satisfy only the client -- and other far more modest even plain pieces deliver amazing punch to the readers all with the power of words.

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                • #9
                  thats kind of how Ive always looked at it too garricks, I think <b> said it too, having the more "boring" information on the back, all the contact info. The more "exciting" info (logo, interesting info) on the front, and then leaving the insides for the informative "leftover" info, including any pictures and/or illustrations. Also I guess any legal info would go on the back?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bob View Post
                    Personally, I think it's most important to start there. The reading order, the visual hierarchy, layout, colours, fonts, photos, styles, treatments -- they all tie into the ideas and structure found (hopefully) in the writing.
                    I agree. Ideally, there's an interesting interplay between the copy and the design, but the copy needs to begin that dance. Unfortunately, most design schools downplay the importance of that seemingly obvious concept.

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                    • #11
                      Don't mistake "boring" for "important." Including legal disclaimers.
                      This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
                      "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by infinity View Post
                        The more "exciting" info (logo, interesting info) on the front, and then leaving the insides for the informative "leftover" info, including any pictures and/or illustrations. Also I guess any legal info would go on the back?
                        There are certain conventions that people come to expect because they've seen it done that way so often. For example, hand a brochure to someone and ask them to find the address they'll immediately look at the back. That's not to say, however, that it needs to be that way, but it helps a designer to be aware of these kinds of conventions and to use them when appropriate and disregard them when they're not.

                        Don't look to or think in terms of formulas, though. There is no recipe for good design unless you're satisfied with mediocre work. The best design pushes the boundaries when appropriate, breaks the rules when it helps and, consequently arrives at a unique and just-right, custom solution to the problem (but you've got to know what you're doing).

                        Coincidentally, I just received two books from Barnes & Noble today, called The Best of Brochure Design, volumes something or other. I haven't had a chance to look through them yet, but I'm quite certain that I won't find any brochures in them based around formulas.

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                        • #13
                          thanks <b>that helps a lot, I guess it was kind of silly to look at it as if there is some sort of "formula"

                          I guess the intimidation from the amount of pages was just fogging my outlook on it. I wasnt given much information to put into the brochure, I look at the small amount of info, and at the vast amount of space, and it makes me go nuts. now that you all mention it though, I should probably look into some more styles of brochures other than just the tri-fold, to find one that better suites the amount of info I have

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by infinity View Post
                            I should probably look into some more styles of brochures other than just the tri-fold, to find one that better suites the amount of info I have
                            http://www.foldfactory.com/ideas.php

                            Here you go, grasshopper. Don't say I never gave you anything good.
                            Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

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                            • #15
                              Not that I can really add much to the great info already given, but...

                              I usually keep any text/copy on the front/cover to a minimum- Imagery, title (if appropriate), company logo. On the back, I have the company logo again, contact info, disclaimer, legal stuff, etc. If necessary, the back is a good place to provide a map/driving directions.

                              As was said, the guts depend on the copy you're working with. Make a couple mock-ups using different fold types, and imagine how the reader will be opening it up, and where it makes sense to put the content.

                              Comment

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