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  • HotButton
    Reply to 4 Easy Tips to Manage Your PowerPoint File Size
    HotButton
    It's currently the MS-Office raster format of choice because its compression is lossless and its transparency is supported....
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  • PrintDriver
    Reply to Updated Brochure layout for ArtMap
    PrintDriver
    Ah, you have just stepped into a big pile of my biggest pet peeve.

    Your printer's proof is NOT another opportunity to change things. It is your opportunity to approve the printer's color...
    Today, 01:44 PM
  • frutiger
    Reply to Why do I struggle with layout?
    frutiger
    Sounds like you're adhering to too many "rules" and limiting yourself "inside the box" too much. I'm sure you've heard the graphic design saying, "You have to know the rules in...
    Today, 01:39 PM
  • Momoshy
    Reply to Death By Micromanagement- Advice Needed
    Momoshy
    You are a good boss, my boss only gets incredibly upset when I point out things like this, or outright blames me instead.

    I guess what I am trying to say, is you have to weight the person...
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  • frutiger
    Reply to 4 Easy Tips to Manage Your PowerPoint File Size
    frutiger
    I just make my photos at 100 percent to size in the PPT with a resolution of 150, sometimes less, then hand off to the client. I've heard that PNGs are the best for Office, but I'm not sure why.
    Today, 01:22 PM

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  • grayscale image has color

    I have a problem with an InDesign file I'm working on. It's a cover for a magazine and in CMYK though some areas need to be in b/w. For the b/w images I converted it to a grayscale image in photoshop, though when I'm printing it, it has a slight reddish tinge. How do I set it up so the b/w images are gray with no color? Is this a printing problem or something in my file?

  • #2
    Printing for real or proofing on an inkjet?
    The image will probably separate to a black plate but a desktop inkjet printing a photo in CMYK almost always uses all 4 inks to make black. Some printers tinge red, some green (like mine).

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    • #3
      I'm printing on a laser printer.. It's a xerox docutech I believe. So i don't think I should have the reddish tinge. I wonder if it's a problem with my file. I set it up in indesign the other images are RGB in photoshop but the b/w images are in grayscale. Then I just converted the PDF file into CMYK when exporting in InDesign. Do you think I should try to convert all my individual files as CMYK? Will that even make a difference?

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      • #4
        Do you have a B/W laser printer? If so print color seperations to see what is 4color and what is B/W, that way you can narrow the problem down.
        WYSIWYG

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        • #5
          Docutech is a bw printer (a behemoth that cranks out 8,000 sheets/hr), so that's probably not what you're using. If you're using the Xerox DocuColor12, then I can relate to your misery. If the file is in CMYK mode, it will use all 4 colors of toner. Your PDF will be more accurate for proofing purposes than a color copy output. If you recalibrate the machine, you may get slightly better results, but I've always noticed a pink tint to files such as yours on the Doc12.

          hope this helps.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by terramera
            I set it up in indesign the other images are RGB in photoshop but the b/w images are in grayscale. Then I just converted the PDF file into CMYK when exporting in InDesign. Do you think I should try to convert all my individual files as CMYK? Will that even make a difference?
            I think a safer practice, in general and if possible, is to convert your pdf's to cmyk before importing them into InDesign. I've found that the color shift, especially in IDCS4, can be dramatic, now that Adobe has given InDesign the rights to convert colors as IT sees.

            Not that this has much to do with colors in the black, but it could.
            People tell me "Have a Good One!' Hell, I already have a good one, I just need a BIGGER one! - George Carlin

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