Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Please Help Me! Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
Search Search Module
Collapse

Advertisement Advertisement Module
Collapse

Featured Images Featured Images Module
Collapse

Mediabistro Creative Sites Mediabistro Creative Sites Module
Collapse
Latest Topics Latest Topics Module
Collapse

  • PanToshi
    Reply to HI!
    PanToshi
    Welcome to GDF George

    We ask all new members to read the very important links here and here. These explain the rules and how the forum runs. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every...
    Today, 03:13 AM
  • BillyLogan
    Reply to Typography resources.
    BillyLogan
    Thanks for sharing! I'v been looking for this on the web for hours for my next project and here it is!
    Today, 03:13 AM
  • georgemaharis1
    HI!
    georgemaharis1
    Just posted in printing and prepress. Hope to see it approved shortly!
    Today, 12:36 AM
  • georgemaharis1
    Register from a Gerber to a Roland or vice versa?
    georgemaharis1
    I need to be able to routinely prototype / make comps of self adhesive labels. This includes both clear and opaque. I have access to a ROLAND VS which does a VERY good job, but the metallics it can...
    Today, 12:14 AM
  • desmiley1
    Reply to Illustrator won't let me highlight text?
    desmiley1
    Same here, new account...Thanks so much for posting this answer. The zombie post lives and has been re-awakened for 2014!
    Yesterday, 10:32 PM
Advertisement Advertisement Module
Collapse

Sponsors Sponsors Module
Collapse

X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Please Help Me!

    Hello, everybody.
    I'm new to this, so please bare with me.
    I'm trying to print a calandar with photos of paintings, and it's not coming out exactly how i've hoped. The printed paintings don't have the same fine details as the image on my computer screen.
    I think it;s important to mention that we're using a paper that imitates the canvas.
    Any ideas, anybody?

  • #2
    What resolution did you scan the painting images?
    What size are the images.
    How much are you enlarging those images in the layout program for print?

    Comment


    • #3
      We've photographed the paintings, we didn't scan them. (The camera is digital, Canon 10 D).
      The final resolution of the paintings is between 180 - 230 dpi.

      Comment


      • #4
        What size are the photos (inches). Is there a pattern on the paper that you're printing on? What kind of printer?
        WYSIWYG

        Comment


        • #5
          The photos are about 15,5 x 11 inches.
          Yes, there is a pattern on the paper (it immitates a canvas).
          The printing machine is a Miller TP 73, in four colour grups.

          Comment


          • #6
            If you're printing the photos at 100% between 180 and 230 you will loose some detail. They should be 300dpi at 100%. You should also use Adobe Photoshop to help bring out your detail such as sharpening, contrast, color correction, etc (RGB to CMYK). If your photos are adjusted to bring out the detail of the paint brush strokes on the canvas, the pattern in the paper (maybe) hampering the effect that your looking for. Maybe you should get your printer involved in adjusting your photos and maybe check out some other paper stock.
            Last edited by jimking; 09-14-2005, 02:00 PM.
            WYSIWYG

            Comment


            • #7
              I print Gliche's on actual canvas in with a wide format solvent inkjet, and I did realize one thing in the learning process:

              When screen printing, if you scan in or photgraph art that already has a halftone, you have to either blur or redraw that halftone. This is because if you try to print the dot pattern of the halftone, the mesh pattern of the screen will conflict with the dot pattern in the art, either creating a moire or exacerbating the halftone entierly into a swirly mess when you print it.

              When printing on canvas and canvas like paper, the same type of thing happens. If the artwork has visible brush strokes or canvas texturing, the pattern in the paper might conflict with that, hampering some details in the same way a screen would eliminate halftone dot pattern details.

              Jimking gave all of the best solutions to this problem. Consider scanning the art, if you can. The higher the resolution, the more likely your finest details will stand up against the grain and texture of the paper when printing.
              IM me sometime! I promise I won't abbrev. any words under fourteen letters long.

              Comment


              • #8
                Only Seen Here, I've seen work come off a Gliche that was incredible. There is a shop around the corner from me called "Old Town Additions" that does what you do--very beautiful work. I'm a printer and we used to use a Gliche (but we called it an Iris) to proof jobs with (what a waste). Old Town Additions scans their work at a very high res--at times at 1200 dpi! They reproduce art from the Smithsonian Institute.
                WYSIWYG

                Comment


                • #9
                  Or have real color transparencies of the artwork shot (this is what most museums and high caliber artists do to reproduce their paintings for color print). Then scan the transparencies. While this may seem redundant because you already have the images 'digitally', the film picks up much finer detail and you can scan the CTs at the size you need.

                  Only Seen Here, as for moire's in screen printing, you need to change the angle of the artwork to adjust for the moire. Don't just lay it on the screen parallel to an edge. If you have to put it at a 45 or 30 or 12.75 angle, then you have to put it at an angle. If using a press this can suck but we do mostly hand pulling and have never had much of an issue.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    what type of camera are you using? that has alot to do with it as well. I find that relicating artwork is the toughest of all in a digital format. It's an uphill battle. you just got to get it looking as nice as possible.
                    "Even when I'm not at 100%, I'm still 110% better then anyone else!"

                    Check out my indie comic books at http://www.crycomic.com and http://www.assassinsguild.net/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PrintDriver
                      Or have real color transparencies of the artwork shot (this is what most museums and high caliber artists do to reproduce their paintings for color print). Then scan the transparencies. While this may seem redundant because you already have the images 'digitally', the film picks up much finer detail and you can scan the CTs at the size you need.

                      Only Seen Here, as for moire's in screen printing, you need to change the angle of the artwork to adjust for the moire. Don't just lay it on the screen parallel to an edge. If you have to put it at a 45 or 30 or 12.75 angle, then you have to put it at an angle. If using a press this can suck but we do mostly hand pulling and have never had much of an issue.
                      Printdriver is correct scan the trans!
                      WYSIWYG

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Jimking: As far as Gliche's, I'm glad someone knows what I'm talking about, it really is killer! That's what I (we, here) print Gliches for, fine art reproduction. It's a wonderful business. I've passed certain files through a drumscanner and imported them at 3000, 4000, and once 7500 DPI, and that's not even close to the 14,000 dpi the scanner is capable of!

                        PD: I was using it as an analogy for how a pattern in the media can exacerbate a pattern in the art, but now I'm interested! If you're talking about scanning a halftone and trying to burn a screen out of it, I've never heard of it being possible (my experience is also limited). Are you saying you can actually rotate the screen on a handpress to different angles? If you could, that makes sense (but impossible on a fixed-frame automatic, of course.)

                        Also, in your experience, what angles do you usually use for each of the process colors? On 200-300 mesh, I've always filmed Cyan @ 172.5, Magenta @ 52.5, Yellow @ 7.5, and K/White @ 112.5. They work pretty well, but I've never tried any others.
                        IM me sometime! I promise I won't abbrev. any words under fourteen letters long.

                        Comment

                        Mediabistro A division of Prometheus Global Media home | site map | advertising/sponsorships | careers | contact us | help courses | browse jobs | freelancers | content | member benefits | reprints & permissions terms of use | privacy policy Copyright © 2014 Mediabistro Inc. call (212) 389-2000 or email us
                        Working...
                        X