Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
printing bleeds on envelopes Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
Search Search Module
Collapse

Advertisement Advertisement Module
Collapse

Featured Images Featured Images Module
Collapse

Mediabistro Creative Sites Mediabistro Creative Sites Module
Collapse
Latest Topics Latest Topics Module
Collapse

  • KitchWitch
    Reply to Need color choice help on logo design...
    KitchWitch
    Hi Haileyfield and welcome to GDF.

    We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't...
    Today, 01:38 PM
  • KitchWitch
    Reply to Typography style at illustrator
    KitchWitch
    Hi Johntek and welcome to GDF.

    We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done...
    Today, 01:37 PM
  • jwood
    Comment on Personal Logo Critique
    jwood
    Roth, thanks for the specific suggestions and directions. To clarify your very last statement, are you saying leave the square portion as is with it's font style, and not incorporate that into the name...
    Today, 12:59 PM
  • StudioMonkey
    Comment on Typography style at illustrator
    StudioMonkey
    can't edit any more for some reason.

    Last point you could use rotate+shear or squash instead of Free Distort
    Today, 12:32 PM
  • StudioMonkey
    Reply to Typography style at illustrator
    StudioMonkey
    First one is easy - rotate + shear. You could do this in InDesign.
    The other two can be done in Illustrator. You can get similar effects with Envelope Distort - either Warp or Mesh - and you don't...
    Today, 11:17 AM
Advertisement Advertisement Module
Collapse

Sponsors Sponsors Module
Collapse

X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • printing bleeds on envelopes

    I was setting up some new envelopes for my company, and they really want a full bleed on the top left corner of the envelope. At the print shop I used to work (only was there for 3 months), they told us envelope artwork ALWAYS had to be 3/16" away from the edge... that we couldn't do any kind of bleed.

    I know it can be done by assembling the envelope, but I was just wondering what the price difference is. Is it MOUNDS more to do it that way? They are non-profit, and like good design, but won't splurge for something too pricy no matter how nice it looks.

    I was also thinking of doing a solid color on the flap.. not sure what goes into that.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    it really depends on how the envelopes are printed... if they are printed and then converted, it might not be a problem.

    If I remember right, the shop where I used to work could handle spot color bleeds but not process color bleeds because of the way the grippers pulled the envelopes through the press.

    You might want to consider checking with other print shops in the area to see if they have a press that can accomodate your design... just a thought.
    "It's never too late to be who you might have been." - George Eliot

    Comment


    • #3
      You need to find a printer that has a Halm Jet envelope press. They don't use grippers, they push the envelope through instead of pulling it so they can print a bleed as well as perfecting (printing on the back) all in one pass. You are however limited to only 2 colors on a standard Halm.

      Getting the envelopes printed and then converted is only economical for large quantities.

      Comment


      • #4
        yeah, it will be spot 1 color + black, so no process printing, and the quantity will be around 2500. I've called my local printer that we use for spot color designs/forms, etc., and they said they'd look into it, so I'm waiting on a call back.

        Thanks for the advice

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Kool
          You need to find a printer that has a Halm Jet envelope press. They don't use grippers, they push the envelope through instead of pulling it so they can print a bleed as well as perfecting (printing on the back) all in one pass. You are however limited to only 2 colors on a standard Halm.

          Getting the envelopes printed and then converted is only economical for large quantities.
          Kool, how's the registration on press like that?
          WYSIWYG

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jimking
            Kool, how's the registration on press like that?
            Your basic 2 color Jet press is on par with a smal duplicator press, AB dick or Ryobi. You can run tight registration logos, etc. all day no problem. The sheet to sheet reg is not perfect but good enough for most things. You could probably do a doutone. They make a 4 color process model but it's really expensive and for most jobs requiring 4 color work it's more economical to get them printed on a Heildelberg and then converted.

            Comment

            Mediabistro A division of Prometheus Global Media home | site map | advertising/sponsorships | careers | contact us | help courses | browse jobs | freelancers | content | member benefits | reprints & permissions terms of use | privacy policy Copyright © 2014 Mediabistro Inc.
            Working...
            X