Announcement

Collapse

Critical Announcement

With great regret, we would like to inform you that the decision has been made to close down www.GraphicDesignForum.com as of January 31, 2018.

The community has started www.GraphicDesignForum.org to continue the discussion.
See more
See less

Color accurate proof

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Drawing a Blank
    started a topic Color accurate proof

    Color accurate proof

    Hello everyone,
    I have been setting up files to send to printers for 4 years now for projects like brochures, marketing collateral, packaging, labels and other small format items. I am the only designer working here and have now been asked to design a three panel show booth, which is going to be printed in Europe (I am in the USA). I received the specs from the printing company this morning from one of our sales reps(that is a problem in and of itself, but not relevant to this). All of the specs seem normal to me except one, which is why I am writing this. The printer wants me to send them a "color accurate print proof" which is somthing I have never been asked to provide before. Each panel is about 26" X 90" and will be printed in 4 color process. I can not think of a way to get color accurate printer proofs other than sending the files to a printer. Is there another way? I am going to try to get in touch with the printer (if it was in the US I would have just done that and not written this), but for now does anyone have any advice?

  • rockem
    replied
    Originally posted by PrintDriver
    Yeah Rockem, that's what we run too. 3 days to proof (usually less depending on the machines' schedules) and 4 or 5 days to produce if stitching is involved...
    I wouldn't have any clients if I told em 3 weeks. Unless it was for HPL or porcelain. LOL!
    haha no clients is right 12 days I think is max for us for some very custom work, thats going through engineers, metal shop, woodshop, paint line, design, production art, filtering, scheduling, printing, finishing, setup, consolodating, and shipping.

    Our proofs are supposed to be three days but they usually always get sent to the production people with a day turn around

    Leave a comment:


  • PrintDriver
    replied
    Yeah Rockem, that's what we run too. 3 days to proof (usually less depending on the machines' schedules) and 4 or 5 days to produce if stitching is involved...
    I wouldn't have any clients if I told em 3 weeks. Unless it was for HPL or porcelain. LOL!

    Leave a comment:


  • rockem
    replied
    12 days thats kind of long, but if ya got the time I guess there is no worries,
    we usually run 5 day lead time here, custom is 7 to 12 days
    tests you can usually have in a day but they say there is a 3 day lead time

    Leave a comment:


  • Drawing a Blank
    replied
    Thanks PD. I won't convert the PMS colors. Their specs actually call for linked raster images which is somthing I already make a practice to do so there shouldn't be a problem there. Their raster file DPI's are also spec'd, but I don't have that info at home but 150 sounds about right. The whole no proof thing has me worried, but this is not a rush job they have quoted 12 business days from receipt of files and we have scheduled a three week window. I'll check out the thread in the resource section. Thanks again.

    Leave a comment:


  • PrintDriver
    replied
    - Sounds like a printed vinyl job. Could be a polyester Lambda job.
    - Don't convert your PMS colors to CMYK. Keep them as PMS colors and let them know you did by calling them out on your hard copy. Supply chips if you have them. In wide format, we don't use seps or plates. If color managed, the PMS colors have to be there for the profiles to read.
    - If you have raster images they should probably be at least 100 to 150dpi AT FINAL SIZE. Do the math. Don't worry (much) about the resolution of the actual Illustrator file if you are working at 100% (actual size).
    - Link your images, don't embed them.
    - No proof is a big risk. Unless they don't have the time, which it sounds like. A no rush schedule for this type of thing is usually 7 business days with a proof.
    - There is a Large format graphic requirements thing in the Resource section. It may confuse you more than help though. And it's always superceded by whatever your printer tells you to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • Drawing a Blank
    replied
    Rockem, actually I haven't done any design on the panels yet. I have the measurements and bleed requirements which I received yesterday(they want them completed by next Tuesday). <sarcasm>I received it yesterday but the marketing department has been talking about it for a month and a half now. Why tell the designer what your doing when you can dump a lot of work on him at the last minute</sarcasm>. The markateers actually want three seperate panels so the only thing that will go from panel to panel is the company logo and possibly an illustration at the bottom. As for going somewhere else...well even if I don't get the information I need this afternoon I actually have no say in who is doing the work. It seems strange but the structure of this company tries to keep me away from our printers. It's a long story and fairly boring so I'll stop. Suffice it to say I would prefer a bigger role in deciding these things.

    I started this morning writing code for a new website for a division of the company, then had to do a production drawing in CAD, talk to the large format printer, write a proposal to udate our artwork and drawing archives, change two label layouts in Illy and sit in a meeting with a printer who wants to work for us(which is really strange since I won't have any say in the decision to hire them or not). My mind is shot. Too much variety makes John a crazy boy. "Heeeeeeres Johnny".
    Last edited by Drawing a Blank; 02-16-2006, 03:07 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • rockem
    replied
    got a pic of it so I can see to see if there are any other problems I can spot out right away?

    Leave a comment:


  • rockem
    replied
    rasterize it if you have alot of transperencies and drop shadows and other illy effects,
    they wont print you a test print? I would find somewhere else to go thats a big red flag in my book.
    remember about your panel breaks if ya wanna keep something from being cut through

    Leave a comment:


  • Drawing a Blank
    replied
    Lets see if I can answer some questions here. First let me tell you that the printer is not overseas as I thought, but is actually in North Carolina. There was some confussion on that point which is mostly my fault, but now I know.
    Originally posted by printdriver
    Why are you converting Pantones to CMYK?
    And they won't supply a color proof after you submit your file?
    What is this being printed on?
    And from what program?
    I was going to convert the spot colors (Pantones) to process because I have usually had to do that for our brochures and marketing collateral and some packaging which were 4 color process and those printers want the colors converted before I sent them. After reading your question and rockems reply I am beginning to think that this may not be a good idea. Comments?

    They will not supply a color proof after I submit my files. I am not sure why.

    I am not sure exactly what it is being printed on (I need to call the printer back to find out) all I know is that it is plastic.

    Last but not least I will be creating these in Illustrator 11 which is their prefered file format. They also prefer Photoshop, but about 60% each panel will be vector artwork so I chose Illustrator instead.

    Let me know if you have any other comments or suggestions and thank you for taking the time to help me out.

    Leave a comment:


  • rockem
    replied
    Im confused to? Call out the pms colors you are going for on your proof, then they will try and hit that. If your telling them to go for the proccess side they probably will try to match to that which will result in a much duller color.
    For getting it done over seas I would get a test print first, shouldnt be to much maybe around 50 -75 and then you know what your getting

    Leave a comment:


  • PrintDriver
    replied
    Errr....You are confusing the heck out of me here.
    Why are you converting Pantones to CMYK?
    And they won't supply a color proof after you submit your file?
    What is this being printed on?
    And from what program?
    I'm kinda curious, having recently been told by one of my vendors that they outsource a certain process to Holland (!)

    Leave a comment:


  • Drawing a Blank
    replied
    Thanks for answering everyone. I spoke with someone at the printers this morning and was told to send an 8.5 by 11 proof so they had somthing to match colors too. I told the rep that I was going to be converting the PMS colors to CMYK before I sent the files, but she still wants me to note which colors are PMS matches (which really are not PMS matches since I'll be converting them into CMYK) which I didn't expect, but that is what the printer wants.

    As I said before I don't usually work in large format to be printed outside my office. Usually if a customer wants to see a color match proof I have the printer supply it(for an extra fee of course) no big deal. This printer will not supply me with a color match proof so I need to find a place to get it printed. I guess it's time to go google for a while.

    Thanks for your replys everyone and rockem "I you would have to print a full size proof why not just do it yourself?" That is exactly what I was thinking.

    Leave a comment:


  • PrintDriver
    replied
    The only place you might run into problems is if you are specifying a Pantone match. Even though booth graphics are printed in '4 color' they aren't done with separations and plates and every printer prints color differently. If you are using PMS solid colors in your mural, speak to the printer about how they want those colors put in the file and indicated on your hard copy (which is what we call that full color print proof).

    Now they may actually be asking for a certified match print, which you will have to send out for. It's called a SWOP proof but I'd be really surprised if that is what they want...

    Leave a comment:


  • rockem
    replied
    dont worry about the size, it is fine to get a 8.5 x11 proof for a 10 foot mirage. I you would have to print a full size proof why not just do it yourself?

    Leave a comment:

Search

Collapse

Sponsor

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

  • B
    Reply to What do you guys think about this designe ?
    B
    I'm guessing that renting a party girl means exactly what one might suspect.

    As for the logo, it looks like a peel-off sticker of some kind. The type is mathematically centered, but visually...
    Today, 09:07 PM
  • PrintDriver
    Reply to migrating or going away?
    PrintDriver
    Merit badges? Really?
    We'll see what happens I guess.
    Today, 08:19 PM
  • B
    Reply to migrating or going away?
    B
    The project manager, Iraszi, from the company that owns the forum, says the company decided to shut down the forum. He's taken the initiative to set up a new, independent forum that isn't owned by the...
    Today, 07:55 PM
  • PrintDriver
    Reply to What do you guys think about this designe ?
    PrintDriver
    What do you mean by ''gig design''?

    As for the thing itself, I might put Perth on its own line under Party Girls. The whole thing kind of gives a mixed message. Is it a modeling agency? Is...
    Today, 07:34 PM
  • PrintDriver
    migrating or going away?
    PrintDriver
    Is this forum migrating to the new or going away and starting over?
    Today, 07:30 PM
GDF A division of Mediabistro Holdings Adweek | Mediabistro | Clio | Film Expo Group Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy Copyright 2016 Mediabistro Holdings
Working...
X