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  • The best printig format

    Again back to ask a newbie question, I design sports based posters as a kind of hobby and sell online. I usually design my posters between 200 and 300 ppi resolution A3 size. Save as PDF and hey presto send to printers. I assume Im not missing a trick? Again sorry for a probable blatant newbie question but new to this forum and looking to ensure Im doing everything correct. Any help is always appreciated.

  • #2
    Do you like the imagery you get back?

    Depending on the printer, using an RGB format may get you more vivid colors than a CMYK format, if your printer is onboard with using profiles to their utmost potential.

    As for designing completely in Photoshop? Not so much. I'd design all the background art in Photoshop, then fire up Indesign, place the image (not embed) and do all the vector art and text in Indesign. Vector objects in Photoshop flatten to the Raster resolution of the file when saved as .pdfs.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
      Do you like the imagery you get back?

      Depending on the printer, using an RGB format may get you more vivid colors than a CMYK format, if your printer is onboard with using profiles to their utmost potential.

      As for designing completely in Photoshop? Not so much. I'd design all the background art in Photoshop, then fire up Indesign, place the image (not embed) and do all the vector art and text in Indesign. Vector objects in Photoshop flatten to the Raster resolution of the file when saved as .pdfs.
      Many thanks for the reply PrintDriver. I do majority of my work in Photoshop. An example of a design is the Madrid Metro station with Real Madrid players. Not much graphics just lots of text and lines. Sometimes the tube/subway/Metro lines come up a little blurry. Im just wondering is it something Im doing in output sending to print company. Again thanks for the replies in advance

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ScottyCCFC View Post
        Many thanks for the reply PrintDriver. I do majority of my work in Photoshop. An example of a design is the Madrid Metro station with Real Madrid players. Not much graphics just lots of text and lines. Sometimes the tube/subway/Metro lines come up a little blurry. Im just wondering is it something Im doing in output sending to print company. Again thanks for the replies in advance
        Heading back to what PrintDriver said, if you created your "text and lines" in a vector layout application, like InDesign, those elements wouldn't be blurry since they'd print at a much higher resolution than the 200-300 ppi you're getting out of Photoshop. As the name implies, Photoshop is ideally suited for working with photos, but not so much for text on posters.

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        • #5
          High res in PhotoShop is 300dpi (for print) which is for images. For text and line art (vector) high res is 2400dpi.

          You could do a PhotoShop image at 2400dpi but it would be HUGE and likely no one would want to print it.
          Last edited by StudioMonkey; 09-20-2016, 04:58 AM.
          Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

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