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Why are some areas getting washed off in Black while Printing

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  • Why are some areas getting washed off in Black while Printing

    Can someone suggest what I can do to prevent the marked areas as in the image from being washed off when printing as seen in the other image . This is a proof of the press that I am going to get my stuff printed at. The marked areas are completely washed off in the proof and thats how it would be in actual print too in press.


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  • #2
    Overall, the entire image is much darker, which shouldn't happen.

    I'm not quite sure what we're looking at. Is this a digital proof that you've just cut and pasted or a hard proof that you've scanned? Did you send the printer your native files or a PDF? Or are we just looking at a hardcopy that you've taken a photo of with you smartphone, which is sort of what it looks like?

    What software applications are you using? Photoshop I assume, and, maybe, InDesign. If so, did you fail to compensate for dot gain by not using the relevant settings? If you saved to PDF from InDesign, those settings would have been in the Export panel under the Output tab on the side in the pulldown Destination menu. There, you basically need to pick the most appropriate entry from the list. Doing so will adjust the file enough to compensate for the peculiarities associated with the press and paper stock being used.

    Actually though, what I've just mentioned is only one possibility, but it's a common workflow oversight. There are half a dozen other things that either you or the printer could have done wrong.

    Those very light areas would be iffy in any case. If it had been me, I likely would have lightened them up just a bit in Photoshop with the dodging tool.

    Comment


    • manishbjain
      manishbjain commented
      Editing a comment
      1. It is a hard proof that I have scanned and the print is looking much like that so you can get the idea how the print has come.

      2. I am using photoshop . It is looking absolutely fine on all the displays I have seen (about 3). I had used Black Point Compensation when converting to CMYK (the above image is after conversion) . I dunno if that creates a problem when printing. When I tried to turn the checkbox of the Black Compensation OFF , It was showing me a darker image like this print above. So I kept the Black compensation ON. Still it has printed like the one I was seeing on the display with Black compensation OFF. It is a TIFF File.

      3. One other thing , When I tried importing this file into Coreldraw too, the image was turning darker a bit .

      What do you think could be troubling ?

  • #3
    could be many things it depends on what programs you are using .

    Comment


    • #4
      This needs to be photograph with strategic backlighting to separate the black handle from the black background. Don't understand what you mean about the background. But to help the handle in Photoshop you have to mask off the handle and replicate the backlighting and adjusting the level. This had to be done prior to press. Not much you can do on press to fix this.

      Comment


      • #5
        The print looks like it is digital. The falloff on the lower left is not typical of an offset print.
        It also looks like you have a conversion issue. Or a profile issue. Or both.
        Is your original image in RGB or CMYK?

        We can only guess what's gone wrong here.
        What you see on the monitor is not what you are going to see in print.
        The best bet is to ask the print vendor what it would take to make the image print correctly. Though I gotta wonder if the vendor even looked at the print. I'd seriously question an output that looked like that before you even saw it.

        Comment


        • #6
          Originally posted by Kayekaye View Post
          This needs to be photograph with strategic backlighting to separate the black handle from the black background. Don't understand what you mean about the background. But to help the handle in Photoshop you have to mask off the handle and replicate the backlighting and adjusting the level. This had to be done prior to press. Not much you can do on press to fix this.

          The handle is looking absolutely fine in the display. The problem is that I am not getting the Black Point Compensation in Print which I kept ON when converting from RGB to CMYK. The Black Point Compensation is however clearly vivid in display.

          Comment


          • Kayekaye
            Kayekaye commented
            Editing a comment
            And this is why I retouch and adjust in CMYK if it's printing in CMYK.

            In the example you posted above, the handle is blending into the background and does not show any separation. I guess if it is ok with your client...

        • #7
          Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
          The print looks like it is digital. The falloff on the lower left is not typical of an offset print.
          It also looks like you have a conversion issue. Or a profile issue. Or both.
          Is your original image in RGB or CMYK?

          We can only guess what's gone wrong here.
          What you see on the monitor is not what you are going to see in print.
          The best bet is to ask the print vendor what it would take to make the image print correctly. Though I gotta wonder if the vendor even looked at the print. I'd seriously question an output that looked like that before you even saw it.
          Yes It is a Digital Print and this Digital Press is 100 percent calibrated to the offset press the actual job will be printed on. Both Presses are in the same company. I have also seen this on a calibrated monitor and it seems fine. Why is it that am not getting that in print is the question. The Original image was RGB thats converted to CMYK and while converting , I kept the Black Point Compensation ON which gives me the desired output on display . But the print what I am getting is like what I see on display if the Black Point Compensation was kept OFF when converting. Simply saying , It is compensating the Black Point for Display and not for Print. I do not understand where I am exactly going wrong.

          Comment


          • #8
            Black point compensation is NOT a magic bullet. And I'll say it one more time, what you see on your monitor, calibrated (to what?) or not, is not necessarily what you will get when you go to print.

            Output still depends on the paper being used, the inks being used and what CMYK profile you applied to the image when you changed from RGB.

            Did you check with your print vendor to be sure you had the correct profile?

            After you changed the image to CMYK, did you place it into a layout program? Are your profiles matched?

            After you did your layout in the layout program, did you create a PDF? If so, what were the job option settings you selected?

            Did you allow for dot gain?

            BPC is the very least of your worries. And like I said, we can only guess. The only really good option here is to discuss it with the print vendor. Ask them why there is falloff in the lower left. It could be they are running a lean ink limit, or maybe even they ripped it for the wrong paper. Crap happens.

            Did you supply a PDF hardcopy? A real hardcopy? Any sort of reference?
            Do you have a desktop inkjet? What happens if you print it there?
            Last edited by PrintDriver; 10-16-2016, 09:57 AM.

            Comment


            • #9
              Digital or Litho would have trouble printing such faint elements in a photo. A lot depends on the paper. Coated might have a chance but anything above 85-90% can fill in and anything below 10-15% can disappear.

              There is one easy solution - lighten the areas that have disappeared and resubmit for a proof. Repeat the process until you are happy with the result.
              Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

              Comment


              • #10
                But why are you trusting a monitor for accuracy? You can never duplicate an image being projected by light with an image being printed on paper.

                Comment


                • #11
                  Dot gain can happen on uncoated stock. To allow for dot gain on uncoated stock, you can increase contrast in your image, or retouching the image so the highlights are more pronounced. It's a bit of guesswork though.

                  If this was an advert in a newspaper on super absorbent newsprint, you wouldn't have a chance in hell that this would work. In that case, I would cut the product out and place it on a light background.
                  It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Lighten the handle (select and remove some black in Levels/Curves, or Dodge) in Photoshop. Assume that 80% black or more is going to print as 100% black.

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