Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Changing Color Mode

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Changing Color Mode

    Hi everybody, I want to print a Flyer but if I change the colour mode from RGB to CMYK for print, the colors change.
    I have downloaded ISO Coated v2 300% from the Shop below and I installed it but I don't know if I have picked the right one in my PS settings. Can anyone help?

  • #2

    Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
    Max, The problem you are having is inherent with what you are doing. The CMYK color space is much smaller than the RGB color space. So all the colors in RGB that are outside the CMYK gamut are squished down to fit, so to speak, and you get a color shift.

    The best way to honor your RGB colors is to convert your image using Edit > Convert to Profile and select the proper print profile for your print vendor.
    You may still get a shift, depending on the color spectrum of your image, but it will be a better one than using Image > Mode > and selecting CMYK. Avoid the image-mode change when going RGB to CMYK.

    In some instances, it is even better to call your printer and ask if you can send the RGB images and have them convert to their actual machine profile (which you, as a designer, may not have.) Adobe does not have all the possible machine profiles and media/inkset/output device permutations that exist out there. That would be more accurate yet.
    #1 - I believe PrintDriver touched on your previous query on the subject. Have a read up on ''Color Gamut'' and how it changes from color space to color space.

    #2 - Why are you creating a flyer in PhotoShop? It is an ineffective tool for this task. You should be using Indesign and importing your images that have been prepared in photoshop (thus the ''photo'' nomenclature) and/or illustrations created in illustrator.

    I don't read German, and I don't utilize online gang printers, so I can't be much help on your vendor query.
    Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

    Comment


    • #3
      #1 Yes I have read it, but this wasn't fixing my problem with the colors. So I tried around

      #2 I used InDesign, but I created artwork in PS which I placed in InDesign.

      The page is also available in english!
      here

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by max.river95 View Post
        #1 Yes I have read it, but this wasn't fixing my problem with the colors. So I tried around
        I haven't seen the color shifts you're experiencing, but if it's the typical color changes that occur during an RGB to CMYK conversion, there's really not much that can be done about it. As already mentioned, there are colors in RGB that just can't be recreated in CMYK, so during the conversion the colors are converted to the closest colors possible in CMYK.

        Originally posted by max.river95 View Post
        #2 I used InDesign, but I created artwork in PS which I placed in InDesign.
        Photoshop, as the name implies, is appropriate for working with (mostly) photos. There are exceptions to this, but in general, typography, hard-edged graphics and most anything else that isn't a photo or photo-like illustration really should be done in an application better suited to the job, like InDesign or Illustrator. This isn't just about personal preference, there are good, solid reason for using the right application for the job that are too numerous to mention here without writing about 20 more paragraphs.

        Comment


        • #5
          @ B. I already knew what you have mentioned. But what I have created was only possible in PS, maybe even in another pixel based program. I`ve placed the PS file as background to a InDesign file, then I`ve added text an vectors in InDesign. I already sent the Pdf to the printers, I hope the differences between the screen version and the print version won`t be so heavy. Ill let you know how it came out!

          Comment


          • #6
            You don't ''hope''
            You get a proof.

            Comment


            • #7
              What I did to convert from rgb to cmyk, is I just started from zero with cmyk color mode in illustrator, in some cases colours wont change if you switch the colour mode to cmyk, but many of them do, so yeah - dont forget about cmyk from the very begining of your project, works fine for me.

              Comment


              • #8
                About the worst thing you can do with Illustrator is use the Color Mode to change stuff after starting your design.
                ALWAYS select your document color mode before you begin using Illustrator. Changing mode mid-stream can have bad effects on everything from transparency to Pantone colors, especially if you are printing digitally.

                Also, when it comes to placed images, the color mode of your document does nothing to change the color mode of the placed image. All things must agree on the output end. PDF output corrects this to some degree, assuming the designer doesn't just push the PDF button and leave it to the defaults. There is a lot to understand about color and graphic print output. This is one of the many things college courses barely even touch, if they touch it at all, even though it is a very big part of being a successful designer.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by chronicalsnow View Post
                  What I did to convert from rgb to cmyk, is I just started from zero with cmyk color mode in illustrator, in some cases colours wont change if you switch the colour mode to cmyk, but many of them do, so yeah - dont forget about cmyk from the very begining of your project, works fine for me.
                  I'm not sure I fully understand the assertions made in that post, but for certain, changing the Document Color Mode in Illustrator doesn't change the colors of anything that's already on the artboard. To change the color mode of elements already on the artboard (regardless of the Document Color Mode), you'd have to select those elements and choose Edit > Edit Colors > Convert to...
                  I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Changing the color mode using File >Document color mode is what I was talking about
                    It does mess with color values and certainly messes with Black. If you go from an RGB file with the Black swatch applied, changing the mode to CMYK will give you a 4-color black.

                    Pantone colors skewed too. It might be only a couple of points, but with digital output, you will see a difference. Especially if you continue your design and apply the color to other shapes. You can see the difference in the image below. The file originally was set up in RGB then color mode changed in an inappropriate fashion to CMYK. This is what happens to Pantone 307. A small shift but noticeable. Click on it to get a larger view.

                    Click image for larger version

Name:	307.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	63.0 KB
ID:	20616
                    Last edited by PrintDriver; 12-09-2016, 11:46 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bottom line is this ; if you are doing artwork for print, start in CMYK mode. If you are doing artwork for a web page, start in RGB mode. If you are doing artwork for web that may later be used for print (like the logo) start in RGB but check how it looks in CMYK.
                      Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

                      Comment


                      • PrintDriver
                        PrintDriver commented
                        Editing a comment
                        If you are doing wide format, call your printer before beginning.
                        There is an RGB print process in Wide Format and some printers prefer you send images in their original camera RGB formats while setting up your files in CMYK. Seems like a contradiction but isn't. Wide format print vendors prefer native layout files instead of PDFs and will apply their custom profiles to your imagery to have them come out looking their best on their particular machinery.
                        You do have to talk to them about it though. Like the design field, there are print vendors out there that buy a machine and hang out a sign with an abysmal lack of production know-how.

                    Search

                    Collapse

                    Sponsor

                    Collapse

                    Incredible Stock

                    Latest Topics

                    Collapse

                    GDF A division of Mediabistro Holdings Adweek | Mediabistro | Clio | Film Expo Group Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy Copyright 2016 Mediabistro Holdings
                    Working...
                    X