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Literal origami boxes as package designs?

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  • Literal origami boxes as package designs?

    Hi.

    Iv'e noticed that most product box designs inspired by origami aren't strictly origami. Origami ethics include not using cuts nor glue, just folds to achieve the box. So is it true: do most origami-inspired product box designs include cuts and/or glue? If so, why is that? Why is that prefered over using a real origami box as a product box design?

    Here's an example of what I'm talking about: http://www.packagingoftheworld.com/2...-food-box.html


  • #2
    Hi Gerardo and welcome to GDF.

    We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
    Shop smart. Shop S-Mart.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply. I did read them before I joined .

      I really hope I can get an answer, or a couple, regarding my question.

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      • #4
        I imagine it has to do with food safety regulations.
        Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Gerardo View Post
          ...most product box designs inspired by origami aren't strictly origami. Origami ethics include not using cuts nor glue, just folds to achieve the box. So is it true: do most origami-inspired product box designs include cuts and/or glue? If so, why is that? Why is that prefered over using a real origami box as a product box design?
          Pan has a point. There could well be food safety concerns.

          "Origami ethics" do not necessarily have a firm foothold in the for-profit food packaging industry. Packaging can be designed any number of ways, but then machinery also must be designed to execute it systematically. That constitutes investment for which a business case would be required.

          If you can convince a food-manufacturer CFO of swift and significant ROI from investment in conversion to origami ethics-compliant packaging, then you can lead the change. Good luck.
          I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

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          • #6
            Thank you guys. That makes it a lot more clear. I wanted to mention that, although my example was related to the food industry, it was just an example. Still, the for-profit argument is very understandable in the packaging industry in general.

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            • #7
              I think it might also be due to the fact that a cut can replace the need for multiple folds/processes, which saves time and money while achieving the same goal. Literally cutting corners.
              Design is not decoration.

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              • #8
                It also has to do with automated packaging. Human fingers can fold something more complicated than machines can, but take much much longer. Having been in the packaging industry for a number of years, I can say for sure that price is the driving factor. The cheaper it is to make, the more likely it is to sell. Eliminating extra folds in favor of cuts/glue/etc can also yield more finished products from the same sheet of material, which gets back to price. And, with time being money, the faster they can be processed and ready to ship the better.
                http://brokenspokedesign.com

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                • #9
                  That makes things a lot more clear. Thank you both.

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                  • #10
                    Can you tell me what machine might have made the box from my example? http://www.packagingoftheworld.com/2...-food-box.html

                    I would like to look for a video of the machine in action. Does it just cut and crease or does it also fold the box?

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                    • #11
                      OK, I think I learned what kind of machine helps with making this kind of boxes. This one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6H81grG4HQ

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