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Logo image gets fuzzy when resizing / printing - PLEASE HELP!!

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  • Logo image gets fuzzy when resizing / printing - PLEASE HELP!!

    I am desperately trying to resolve this issue. I created a hand-drawn sketch, black and white, in Illustrator, and dragged into Photoshop. It is a HUGE file. But whenever I resize the image, it gets immediately fuzzy. HOW can I fix this issue?! I need to send this file to a client, and it will need to be resized (by them) for all sorts of printed applications. It also needs to be saved with a transparent background. Which file format should I be saving it in, so that no matter how often it gets resized, or how small, it looks and prints sharp. It does this right now no matter whether I save it as a .jpg, or .bmp, or tiff -- What should I do?

    Many thanks for any suggestions!
    Last edited by irishlass25; 02-28-2017, 07:35 PM.

  • #2
    Why did you move it into Photoshop, and why are you engaged in logo design for a client if you don't know how to do it?
    I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

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    • irishlass25
      irishlass25 commented
      Editing a comment
      Your assumptions are astounding, sir. By 'client' I meant a non-profit organization that I am doing design work for, in exchange for nothing. I used the word "client" because it was quicker than giving a long-winded explanation of who the logo is for. Incidentally, they are thrilled with the logo I designed; it was approved unanimously by the entire board of directors. My only mistake was misunderstanding a technical aspect of Photoshop, as my expertise is in web design, not images for print. But hey, at least I'm trying. And at least I'm doing volunteer work for a non-profit. When's the last time you did?

    • HotButton
      HotButton commented
      Editing a comment
      My comments were based upon that which you presented here plainly, and I stand by them. The fact that you're doing it pro bono for a non-profit organization where the sketch has been well received makes no difference, or in fact might even make it worse. For one thing, ''non-profit'' doesn't mean everything goes in and comes out for free. Their branding is just as important (in some ways, more sensitive) as that of a for-profit business. It should be developed by a trained professional who is experienced in brand design, and the business (it is a business) should pay for it. Going about it as they are in this case is their mistake to make, but if mistakes that you make lead to otherwise-avoidable production expenses for them in the future, then your volunteerism will be working in reverse, won't it? I've done plenty of volunteer work, but would never put the organization for whom I'm volunteering at risk by offering something I didn't know how to deliver.
      Last edited by HotButton; 03-01-2017, 11:54 AM.

    • irishlass25
      irishlass25 commented
      Editing a comment
      Your time is better spent helping those who need it. You've wasted your time and mine with me. Bye!

  • #3
    If you created this in Illustrator you have got that part right. An Illustrator file (.ai or .eps) can be resized with out loss of quality. Your mistake was to move it into PhotoShop which is a raster application so breaks the image down into pixels. Enlarging this kind of file (.jpg, or .bmp, or tiff) creates the fuzziness you see because you are merely enlarging the pixels.

    Go back to your Illustrator file and use that.
    Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

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    • #4
      Originally posted by StudioMonkey View Post
      If you created this in Illustrator you have got that part right. An Illustrator file (.ai or .eps) can be resized with out loss of quality. Your mistake was to move it into PhotoShop which is a raster application so breaks the image down into pixels. Enlarging this kind of file (.jpg, or .bmp, or tiff) creates the fuzziness you see because you are merely enlarging the pixels.

      Go back to your Illustrator file and use that.
      Thank you. I realize that Photoshop is a raster program. However, I am having the same "fuzziness" issue when I open my original hand-drawn sketch directly in Photoshop, clean it up, and save as a .jpg or .tiff. Resizing THAT file gets fuzzy the same way, and it was never in Illustrator. Also, I am making the files smaller, not larger, so I wouldn't expect that to get fuzzy?

      Comment


      • #5
        Taking your file into PhotoShop will make it fuzzier than an Illustrator file, even if you reduce in size. Illustrator saves as a vector illustration which is all clean lines. Saving it as .jpg, or .bmp, or tiff will not help as these are raster file types.
        Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

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        • #6
          Originally posted by StudioMonkey View Post
          Taking your file into PhotoShop will make it fuzzier than an Illustrator file, even if you reduce in size. Illustrator saves as a vector illustration which is all clean lines. Saving it as .jpg, or .bmp, or tiff will not help as these are raster file types.
          Ok, thank you very much. So, 1) do you think I cannot salvage what I've done in Photoshop? I did a few hours of editing in photoshop... And 2) if I HAD to start over in Illustrator, how would I need to save the file so that my client can easily use it (resizing, etc) and with a transparent background? I thought you had to save even llustrator files in photoshop, in order to remove a white background and save with a transparent background?

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by irishlass25 View Post
            I created a hand-drawn sketch, black and white, in Illustrator...

            ...when I open my original hand-drawn sketch directly in Photoshop...
            I suspect what's missing here is some clue that despite your mention of Illustrator, you never had vector art here. Please describe exactly what you did with respect to "hand drawn sketch." The characterization: "created...in Illustrator" suggests it was born as vector artwork via use of a tablet/stylus, or at least that's how I read it. Now I don't know how you did it. But if it was hand drawn on paper, how do you "open it directly" in Photoshop?
            I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

            Comment


            • #8
              Oh my . . .

              1) You can use your PhotoShop file for a website or suchlike

              2) Do your edits again in Illustrator - it won't necessarily take as long as you think and although it's rough to redo any kind of work, it's the best way. Some of the things you did in PhotoShop may not be possible in Illustrator, simply because there are different tools. Save your file as an .ai file or .eps file. Your client may prefer a PDF file but this can be saved from Illustrator too. Illustrator files should have a transparent background by default so no you don't have to save Illustrator files in PhotoShop to remove a white background.

              Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by StudioMonkey View Post
                Oh my . . .

                1) You can use your PhotoShop file for a website or suchlike

                2) Do your edits again in Illustrator - it won't necessarily take as long as you think and although it's rough to redo any kind of work, it's the best way. Some of the things you did in PhotoShop may not be possible in Illustrator, simply because there are different tools. Save your file as an .ai file or .eps file. Your client may prefer a PDF file but this can be saved from Illustrator too. Illustrator files should have a transparent background by default so no you don't have to save Illustrator files in PhotoShop to remove a white background.
                I hand drew this logo (it looks like an engraving) on paper, then scanned it in to my computer. So I am working with a PHOTO of my original hand-drawn artwork. Which is why I first experimented with it in Photoshop -- it was a photo. So, regarding getting a transparent background in Illustrator, that's not possible because my sketch has a white (originally paper that I drew on) background attached to it. In photoshop, I was able to clean up around the edges of the sketch, which I cannot do in Illustrator. See my problem here?

                If I can successfully turn my sketch into vector outlines in Illustrator, how would I save that WITHOUT it being attached to the original white background it was drawn on? A transparent background? isn't photoshop the only option?

                Please know I greatly appreciate your help here!!

                Comment


                • #10
                  Ah OK I understand your problem. You would have to redraw or trace your hand drawn illustration in Illustrator. Put your scan on a separate layer to do this then delete that layer - as long as your photo is not there you won't have a white background.
                  Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

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                  • #11
                    There is a trace tool in Illustrator but I have had mixed results - might save you some time
                    Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Originally posted by StudioMonkey View Post
                      Ah OK I understand your problem. You would have to redraw or trace your hand drawn illustration in Illustrator. Put your scan on a separate layer to do this then delete that layer - as long as your photo is not there you won't have a white background.
                      I will do this. Thanks -- you're the best!

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        You said you scanned it. At what resolution did you scan it?
                        The higher the better. Especially if you are going to use autotrace in Illustrator (which is usually a bad idea IMO, photoslop actually does a better job at creating a solid path from pixels on a black and white image.)

                        As far as an illustration, you said this was a logo? Or is it just an illustration. Normally when I commission an illustration from an artist, it gets scanned at an appropriate resolution for output. I'd certainly not want it vectorized. If I don't know the intended use (not often but it happens) I get it scanned at the absolute maximum uninterpolated resolution available to the scanner. Then for yucks I let it scan at it's highest guessed interpolation.

                        Last edited by PrintDriver; 03-01-2017, 05:18 PM.

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