Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Poor ink transfer on textured paper

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Poor ink transfer on textured paper

    I purchased a bunch of paper samples from Mohawk and Neenah - smooth, eggshell and cotton papers. The printer I'm working with uses an HP Indigo digital press. All the smooth paper samples look great but anything with the slightest texture gets a spotty, mottled kind of look. The printer said it's just the nature of using textured papers on a digital press but that logic didn't add up to me. I called Mohawk and they said this shouldn't be happening but couldn't really give solid advice without seeing my samples and knowing the printer settings. The thing is, this has happened with other printers too and they all tend to say the same thing. But why would companies like Mohawk and Neenah make these beautiful textured papers FOR digital press if they didn't work on digital press.

    You can see the samples in the attached link - two images, one on smooth surface and the other on eggshell to see what I'm talking about.

    Does anyone have any insight? I want to troubleshoot this with the printer without offending them.

    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/icvt5qe38...tDIwczpNa?dl=0
    Last edited by PanToshi; 05-31-2017, 10:19 AM.

  • #2
    Hi Bird and welcome to GDF.

    We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
    Shop smart. Shop S-Mart.

    Comment


    • #3
      So you are the designer and you want to tell the printer how to do their job?
      The printer may be politely telling you they don't want to change their workflow for your textured papers. They may have their press set for what they run all the time and doing something to change those settings may actually be hours of work to set back.

      Rather, why don't you ask Mohawk who they might recommend as for a printer who uses their papers successfully. Maybe they can offer suggestions.

      Comment


      • #4
        Your printers are right, digital printing on textured stock is more difficult. It is doable with the right equipment, though. Maybe the printers you're using don't have that equipment or, maybe, as PrintDriver said, they're unwilling to take the time and expense to make the adjustments.

        Here's an interesting article that might shed a little light on the subject: https://digitalprinting.blogs.xerox..../#.WS7_JmQrJN0

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
          So you are the designer and you want to tell the printer how to do their job?
          The printer may be politely telling you they don't want to change their workflow for your textured papers. They may have their press set for what they run all the time and doing something to change those settings may actually be hours of work to set back.

          Rather, why don't you ask Mohawk who they might recommend as for a printer who uses their papers successfully. Maybe they can offer suggestions.
          I'm really not sure the tone in this - but no, of course I'm not trying to tell the printer how to do their job. The printer (business owner) is new and a friend and willing to troubleshoot this together. I wasn't asking why the printer might not want to get it right so not sure why you come from the position that i'm somehow entitled? I'm asking as a professional if it is POSSIBLE to get this right because I'm hearing two contrasting things from the printer and from the paper manufacturer. I wasn't looking for a manners lesson but thanks

          What I was hoping to find out was what those adjustments would be and if it's even possible to get the ink to adhere to textured surface as consistently as it does to smooth.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by KitchWitch View Post
            Hi Bird and welcome to GDF.

            We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
            Thanks! Will do

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by B View Post
              Your printers are right, digital printing on textured stock is more difficult. It is doable with the right equipment, though. Maybe the printers you're using don't have that equipment or, maybe, as PrintDriver said, they're unwilling to take the time and expense to make the adjustments.

              Here's an interesting article that might shed a little light on the subject: https://digitalprinting.blogs.xerox..../#.WS7_JmQrJN0
              Thank you! This is incredibly helpful. Would you mind telling me what the equipment is? Maybe if this printer doesn't have it, it will help me find a printer that will.

              Comment


              • #8
                This is a new guy to the print industry?
                Custom profiling is the most mind-bending part of this industry, and often the least understood.

                Show him the article B posted on how to create custom profiles. He may not have the same equipment but it is informative and he may even have canned profiles he can just select or download to add options to his printer driver, without having to do the manual adjustments described in that article. It's those manual adjustments, which can be different for each kind of paper, that take time. And time is money. It also takes more than a few sample sheets to make the adjustments.

                Mohawk and Neenah, at the customer service level required, won't take the time to describe in detail to someone not in the printer side of things exactly what needs to be done. Your printer friend might be able to call them, tell them what equipment he is running and ask for specific suggestions from them. It happens. There's a lot of proprietary stuff floating around out there and most of the info way too specific for any generic type of answer.

                If he can't figure out whether or not his machinery has such adjustments available, he should call the machine installer/service line and ask them what to do with his particular machine.
                Even experienced printers need occasional help with new equipment and new media. A service contract that includes support is always a wise choice.

                I work with a lot of print vendors. Some are more adventurous than others. I've asked some of them to print on some pretty crazy things. It's perfectly within their purview to say ''no,'' but I know a few (fewer every year) that can't resist the challenge.

                I also have print vendors who print only on certain fabrics or media and they do not deviate from that as they have their presses set for 24/7 runs of the same material. To change one over for something special makes a huge dent in their production run time. When a machine isn't producing salable product, the company loses money.

                It's just a fact of life out there. And a business decision. Run lean and do a few things well with a good price point, or try to accommodate a wider range of material and price accordingly.

                Does your stuff have to be printed digitally? If the job is large enough, a 4-color conventional press might be a better option for textured paper. Especially if folding is at all involved. Toner and folding sometimes doesn't produce a pleasing result.
                Last edited by PrintDriver; 05-31-2017, 05:15 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
                  This is a new guy to the print industry?
                  Custom profiling is the most mind-bending part of this industry, and often the least understood.

                  Show him the article B posted on how to create custom profiles. He may not have the same equipment but it is informative and he may even have canned profiles he can just select or download to add options to his printer driver, without having to do the manual adjustments described in that article. It's those manual adjustments, which can be different for each kind of paper, that take time. And time is money. It also takes more than a few sample sheets to make the adjustments.

                  Mohawk and Neenah, at the customer service level required, won't take the time to describe in detail to someone not in the printer side of things exactly what needs to be done. Your printer friend might be able to call them, tell them what equipment he is running and ask for specific suggestions from them. It happens. There's a lot of proprietary stuff floating around out there and most of the info way too specific for any generic type of answer.

                  If he can't figure out whether or not his machinery has such adjustments available, he should call the machine installer/service line and ask them what to do with his particular machine.
                  Even experienced printers need occasional help with new equipment and new media. A service contract that includes support is always a wise choice.

                  I work with a lot of print vendors. Some are more adventurous than others. I've asked some of them to print on some pretty crazy things. It's perfectly within their purview to say ''no,'' but I know a few (fewer every year) that can't resist the challenge.

                  I also have print vendors who print only on certain fabrics or media and they do not deviate from that as they have their presses set for 24/7 runs of the same material. To change one over for something special makes a huge dent in their production run time. When a machine isn't producing salable product, the company loses money.

                  It's just a fact of life out there. And a business decision. Run lean and do a few things well with a good price point, or try to accommodate a wider range of material and price accordingly.

                  Does your stuff have to be printed digitally? If the job is large enough, a 4-color conventional press might be a better option for textured paper. Especially if folding is at all involved. Toner and folding sometimes doesn't produce a pleasing result.
                  Thank you - this is very informative and helpful. Makes a lot of sense. Yes, he is relatively new and very ambitious and outputs some really exceptional quality stuff. Our products are one-offs (they're personalized) but we sell a high volume so unfortunately, offset isn't an option. It's just a matter of either getting it right on his press or finding the right printer already set up to do it it seems.

                  I'm perfectly fine if a printer tells me no and says that it's not worthwhile for them to change their settings to accommodate my pieces - that makes sense to me. But when they say it can't be done and the paper manufacturers are saying it can, that's when I scratch my head and start digging for more info.

                  Comment

                  Search

                  Collapse

                  Sponsor

                  Collapse

                  Incredible Stock

                  Latest Topics

                  Collapse

                  GDF A division of Mediabistro Holdings Adweek | Mediabistro | Clio | Film Expo Group Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy Copyright 2016 Mediabistro Holdings
                  Working...
                  X