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  • Creating a PDF Magazine / PPT for Research Results

    Hi guys, this is my first post (beyond my hello post). How is everyone?

    I'm currently designing a document to be used to deliver research findings. This will take two forms - the first is a portrait multipage PDF magazine-style document; the second is a landscape Powerpoint presentation. Let's concentrate on the first for now. I'm pretty fine with the actual design process of each page but was hoping to get some advice on the construction of the finished document.

    I was imagining I would create the individual pages in Photoshop, importing images, graphics etc. and then put it together in InDesign where the final document is exported. Here is a reference example to demonstrate the functionality I'm going for. Can someone advise me on the document set up and what export options from InDesign I should check to make it sure it works like this? My initial test was sort of okay but not quite there....

  • #2
    Photoshop shouldn't be any part of creating individual pages.
    Photoshop is a photo editing tool (or an image creation tool)
    PHOTOSHOP IS NOT A LAYOUT TOOL!
    Work in Indesign. Do all your text and layout there. You Place images/graphics into Indesign. Be sure to use Place. No copy paste, no drag and drop.

    What is the end purpose of the PDF? That determines the parameters needed to export from Indesign.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Daniel_M View Post
      I was imagining I would create the individual pages in Photoshop, importing images, graphics etc. and then put it together in InDesign where the final document is exported.
      Create the pages in InDesign. The primary use for Photoshop is in working with photos and scanned items, which you would then import into the pages you create in InDesign. It's most definitely not the right software tool in which to create pages.

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      • #4
        I had a feeling this might a response - good to have it stated so clearly, thanks! I find Photoshop faster and I have way more experience with it, which is why it's hard to break out of the habit of using it (I know it's not ideal...). I'll try to work out the equivalent working methods in InDesign and go from there.

        The final document will come in two forms. A portait digital PDF with embedded video and for viewing on screen and the option for printing: this I'm designing A4 at 300dpi with enough bleed for print and I suppose I would have to provide a CMYK print version. The other form would be a landscape Powerpoint presentation. As there would be layout changes needed for this, and probably some edits to the content, I'm going to leave this for now if that's sensible.

        So the practical end purpose is as above. Further to this, it's to present findings of research to companies. This findings will form the content, which is going to be fairly text heavy, bullet points, quotes, various forms of media and possibly graphs.

        I had forgotten to include a link to the reference document I'm attempting to replicate - you should find it here now.

        Thanks for the help so far!

        https://issuu.com/weareamplify/docs/...gital_050516-f
        Last edited by KitchWitch; 08-28-2017, 02:01 PM. Reason: fixed link

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Daniel_M View Post
          the option for printing
          desktop printing? or professional printing?

          Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

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          • #6
            Hmm, well that's not certain yet. I would imagine desktop, just to have a physical counterpart to the digitally presentable version.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Daniel_M View Post
              Hmm, well that's not certain yet. I would imagine desktop, just to have a physical counterpart to the digitally presentable version.
              Your color space looks like it is set to rgb.

              Well, if the intent is to print on some office deskjet, rgb will probably be fine as long as you/your readers are not looking for accurate color representation.

              If the intent is to print on a press, then you will have to adjust your colors/color space accordingly.
              Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Daniel_M View Post
                I find Photoshop faster and I have way more experience with it, which is why it's hard to break out of the habit of using it (I know it's not ideal...).
                "Not ideal" is a gross understatement. Photoshop is in no way, shape or form a tool that is suitable for laying out pages.

                The typical resolution of an output device for commercial printing runs upwards of three- or four-thousand dots per inch. These aren't halftone dots of a photo or a screentint, they're the extremely fine digital breakdowns of the imagery that keeps lines and edges from being jagged and small type readable. The resolution of even a cheap desktop printer is often over 1,000 dots of ink/toner per inch. When printed, that 300 ppi Photoshop file you'll be making will degrade the quality of any sharp lines and risk anti-aliasing what should be a sharp division between one color and the next.

                In your case, with the intended purpose of making a distributable PDF, the raster (instead of vector) imagery of the document will not only degrade the quality, it will make the PDF itself much, much larger, even with large amounts of image-degrading JPEG compression.

                And I haven't even touched on thing like trapping, editing, color management/fidelity, searchability, type hinting, overprinting vs. knocking out and about two dozen other things that Photoshop either can't do, isn't intended to do or can't be done without an inordinate amount of extra work.

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                • #9
                  All of that is noted, thanks. In my fairly fruitless explorations I've exported some PDFs that came out looking shocking... so this is definitely a step further into professional design that I've been needing to make for a long time.

                  Supposing I get to grips with creating the pages in InDesign then, what sort of working method should I consider? Would you create a single project and construct the PDF in that? Or have different files for different pages and then put them all together afterwards? It seems there are various approaches here.

                  There is to be a repeated design style here so I'm keeping in mind consistent design elements to form a template for future reports.

                  (I'm running Windows 10 with InDesign x64 12.1.0.56.)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Daniel_M View Post
                    Supposing I get to grips with creating the pages in InDesign then, what sort of working method should I consider? Would you create a single project and construct the PDF in that? Or have different files for different pages and then put them all together afterwards? It seems there are various approaches here.
                    InDesign is built to create multi-page documents. You don't create a bunch of separate pages, then hook them together -- that's not the way it works. You'll need a conceptual understanding of what InDesign is for and how it works before you can even start -- it's not at all like Photoshop. The best placed to start is with the basics. Maybe some others here can point you to a good beginning tutorial or set of instructions. I've been using all these programs for so long that I've sort of lost touch with what it's like to start out learning them.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I can understand that, it's like me and music programs... and you've kind of inadvertently answered part of my questioning anyway, so that's good. I'll track down a decent introduction and some tutorials specific to my needs, then perhaps post some direct questions if it seems appropriate. Thanks for engaging with me so far.

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