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Overprinting Pantone Colours

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  • Overprinting Pantone Colours

    I'm having a minor issue that I'd like to get to the bottom of it someone could help me out.

    I'm trying to make a mustard yellow colour by putting down
    Yellow (100%) with Pantone 485 Red (25%), now in Illustrator this looks fine and the correct colour I want to achieve.
    When printing I normally use the "Flatten Transparency" and "Preserve Alpha Transparency", however when I do this the colour seems to change to the 25% of the red colour and none of the yellow?
    If I try the same with other colours such as Process Blue & Pantone 485 I have this same problem? Has anyone got any ideas on this issue?

  • #2
    Which program are you using?

    Adobe doesn't believe Spot colors can be made Transparent and their software has a lot of bugs where that concept is concerned.

    ''It looks good on my monitor'' is NOT going to fly.
    Can you select a mustard color pantone? Or are you trying to work with only the two colors yellow and red?

    You need to talk to your printer about what you are trying to do in order to determine the best method of achieving that mix.



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    • #3
      Originally posted by iamdamienl View Post
      When printing I normally use the "Flatten Transparency" and "Preserve Alpha Transparency"...
      Not sure I follow you on that...what application are you printing from?
      I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by iamdamienl View Post
        When printing
        I'm confused. How are your printing this? Offset? With Pantone and process inks?
        Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PanToshi View Post
          I'm confused. How are your printing this? Offset? With Pantone and process inks?
          This will be printed on flexo and will be done with plates is the plan.


          Originally posted by HotButton View Post

          Not sure I follow you on that...what application are you printing from?
          I'm doing the artwork in Illustrator CS6 on macOS Sierra.


          Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
          Which program are you using?

          Adobe doesn't believe Spot colors can be made Transparent and their software has a lot of bugs where that concept is concerned.

          ''It looks good on my monitor'' is NOT going to fly.
          Can you select a mustard color pantone? Or are you trying to work with only the two colors yellow and red?

          You need to talk to your printer about what you are trying to do in order to determine the best method of achieving that mix.
          I was trying to use only the two colours so I'll need one less plate.. I can achieve the right colour but its only when I flatten it for printing ona small desktop printer that the colour changes.

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          • #6
            Don't flatten it for printing on your desktop inkjet.
            Desktop inkjets work on the KISS principle. I'm not sure why you are using the gymnastics you are using just to print to a desktop inkjet.
            However, with Pantones and transparency you always run the risk of even a desktop inkjet printing an unintended result. If that happens, for your desktop printer, convert all spots to process. That way you don't give your Adobeware a stroke.

            As for one less plate, have you had success with this color mixing on flexo before?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
              Don't flatten it for printing on your desktop inkjet.
              Desktop inkjets work on the KISS principle. I'm not sure why you are using the gymnastics you are using just to print to a desktop inkjet.
              However, with Pantones and transparency you always run the risk of even a desktop inkjet printing an unintended result. If that happens, for your desktop printer, convert all spots to process. That way you don't give your Adobeware a stroke.

              As for one less plate, have you had success with this color mixing on flexo before?

              KISS principle? I've never heard of it. I wanted to get a rough preview of how the colour would look before sending the artwork away for plates. Is there better software you'd recommend? Thanks for your help thus far.

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              • #8
                If your file is properly set up for separation to flexo plates the way you describe, you won't get accurate output from your inkjet. It simply isn't an equivalent application of ink—not even a rough equivalent. Still not sure why you flatten transparency "normally."
                I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

                Comment


                • #9
                  KISS = Keep It Stupid Simple
                  The companies that make deskjet printers are only expecting their consumer purchasers to be able to push the print button and get a happy result. They aren't expecting pre-press quality knowledge, or color accurate results.

                  What your deskjet produces, unless it is somehow calibrated via profile to approximate flexo output, won't even come close to a flexo screened plate result.

                  Are you a designer or do you work in a flexo facility (or both)?
                  I'm not sure either why you flatten transparency. The moment you do that, your spot color info in the file pretty much goes out the window anywhere it interacts with another color. You lose shape integrity too.

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                  • #10
                    I do both design and work with flexo. It's strange I've never noticed this issue before, the reason why we flatten transparency is so when the client views the PDF most of the time this would give a better idea of how the artwork should look as its fairly long winded explaining about changing the overprint setting for viewing proofs

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