Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Printing a doc with 72dpi photos

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Printing a doc with 72dpi photos

    I'm sorry if the title alone makes you cringe guys.

    I have two photos to include in InDesign doc and prepare for print.
    They're from Unsplash and in RGB, 72 dpi.
    I understand the best format would be to save them as .tiff before importing to InDesign.

    How do I sort out the resolution? Leave it? Change it manually to 300 dpi?
    This is for an A4 brochure not an art book, but it still needs to be presentable.

    As for RGB, will simple conversion to CMYK work here?

    Help a newb, a thousand thanks.

  • #2
    Manually changing the resolution wont fix the image quality.
    Let me ask this, what size are the images in terms of inches or centimeters?
    if the images are rather large in physical size, when you scale them down you'll actually be gaining DPI.
    However if they are 72DPI and tiny, and worse so if you must scale them up to accommodate the design requirements, you may have even less than 72dpi in the end.

    You could apply some artistic filters or photography actions to the images to mask the pixelation.

    I don't think you need to really do a pre-conversion before you place them in InDesign. Sometimes you run the risk of loosing even more color data if you're not savy with color profiles.

    Comment


    • #3
      As Biggs said, you can't increase the quality and sharpness of an already existing photo by increasing its resolution. All you'll get is a higher-resolution blurry photo that looks just like the old one. Also, as Biggs said, if the 72 PPI (not DPI) photo is large and needs to be scaled down to fit, the resolution and quality will increase as you shrink it down (providing you don't resample the image in the process). This occurs because you'll be packing more of the image's pixels into a smaller space. The reverse it also true. If, for example, you grab a small, low-res jpeg off a website and make it larger, the resolution will actually decrease since you'll be spreading those pixels out over a larger area.

      All that said, if you up the resolution to 300 PPI (or so) at the dimensions is going to be printed, sometimes sharpening the photo (Photoshop'ssharpen filters) at the higher resolution will help define the edges in the blurriness just a little a bit better. It won't help much, though.

      If this were me and I was doing this for a client who supplied those images, I'd come right out and tell them that it will look terrible when printed. If they insisted, (and depending on the client) I might even go so far as to make them sign a waver/release form absolving me from liability over the poor quality..

      As for converting RGB to CMYK, will this be printed 4-color process on a traditional printing press or will you be using digital printing? If it's 4-color process, yes, convert it to CMYK in Photoshop before importing it into InDesign. If it'll be printed digitally, it's a tougher call since RGB vs CMYK is dependent upon the capabilities of the digital printing machine. With digital printing, either way will likely work, but which is best for the situation at hand, is something to ask the company that will be printing it.

      Comment


      • #4
        I disagree with converting it to CMYK in photoshop before placing.

        The export from InDesign with Colour Conversion (Preserve Numbers) will do the exact same conversion as photoshop.
        If you're converting all your images to CMYK then you're going to have the same image in RGB and CMYK.

        Best practice is to leave as is.

        Export your file to PDFX4a - which does no colour conversion - and the printers should convert all colours to CMYK in their RIP.

        Remember if you convert your colours from CMYK to RGB - there's no way back to the same RGB gamut as it's completely lost.

        "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

        Comment


        • #5
          A little caveat.

          Most images you download from Getty, Unsplash, etc. are 72 ppi.

          In InDesign, in your Links palette, choose "Panel Options" and check the "Show Column" check box for effective ppi to know what the actual image will be printing at. It essentially echoes what Biggs, B and Hank have said, but this way you can verify what the actual outcome is.
          __________________________________________________
          I like to beat up pacifists, because they don't fight back ...

          N.A.N.K.A. "We Kick Because We Care."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by hank_scorpio View Post
            I disagree with converting it to CMYK in photoshop before placing.

            The export from InDesign with Colour Conversion (Preserve Numbers) will do the exact same conversion as photoshop.

            Export your file to PDFX4a - which does no colour conversion - and the printers should convert all colours to CMYK in their RIP.
            The reason I recommend conversion in Photoshop to a newbie is because it's essential that designers understand things like color spaces, printing and resolution issues. As evidenced by the original question, this person is confused by the same concepts that confuse nearly every new designer facing this stuff. Hiding the necessary education about the fundamental aspects of printing behind computer algorithms denies a new designer the insight and problem-solving skills that come from a fundamental understanding of the concepts.

            For someone who's fully versed in these things and understands print production fundamentals, sure, letting InDesign (or any other piece of software) automate this kind of stuff can work well most of the time. For someone who doesn't understand the issues at play and has become over-reliant on software filters, check boxes and buttons, that bright pink and electric blue, hand-tinted Photoshop background sent to the offset printing company as an RGB is going to come back in printed form as a disappointingly dull, dreary and expensive version of what the designer thought he sent.

            The reason I, personally, prefer to make the RGB to CMYK conversions in Photoshop is because I want to see what the CMYK will look like as I'm working with it. Most of the time, there's not much of a difference to the RGB, but it's not at all uncommon for me to tweak the CMYK in an effort to compensate a bit for what was removed during the conversion.

            Comment


            • #7
              Just done a quick calculation - if you have a 72dpi pic it will be 300dpi if you reduce it in size to 24%.
              Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

              Comment


              • Craig B
                Craig B commented
                Editing a comment
                Once again, if you're in InDesign, show the effective PPI column in the links palette and you don't need to do any calculations. The palette will handle it all for you.

              • HotButton
                HotButton commented
                Editing a comment
                Also worth noting that it's unlikely you actually need all 300 ppi, which is nothing but a dumb catch-all guideline.

            • #8
              When I checked out Unsplash a while back, a good number of the sample images I pulled up had very large pixel dimensions. One of them was something like 80" x 60" at 72ppi. If scaled down to 8" x 6" that would be 720ppi - more than overkill for any kind of print process.
              Last edited by PrintDriver; 11-30-2017, 12:44 PM.

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by B View Post

                The reason I recommend conversion in Photoshop to a newbie is because it's essential that designers understand things like color spaces, printing and resolution issues. As evidenced by the original question, this person is confused by the same concepts that confuse nearly every new designer facing this stuff. Hiding the necessary education about the fundamental aspects of printing behind computer algorithms denies a new designer the insight and problem-solving skills that come from a fundamental understanding of the concepts.

                For someone who's fully versed in these things and understands print production fundamentals, sure, letting InDesign (or any other piece of software) automate this kind of stuff can work well most of the time. For someone who doesn't understand the issues at play and has become over-reliant on software filters, check boxes and buttons, that bright pink and electric blue, hand-tinted Photoshop background sent to the offset printing company as an RGB is going to come back in printed form as a disappointingly dull, dreary and expensive version of what the designer thought he sent.

                The reason I, personally, prefer to make the RGB to CMYK conversions in Photoshop is because I want to see what the CMYK will look like as I'm working with it. Most of the time, there's not much of a difference to the RGB, but it's not at all uncommon for me to tweak the CMYK in an effort to compensate a bit for what was removed during the conversion.

                I understand that a beginner may need direction. However, it is considered bad practice these days to convert RGB to CMYK and then place them.
                It's actually best to keep them in their original colour space - no matter what that is, and convert on output, or at the RIP - the RIP is preferred.

                https://indesignsecrets.com/import-r...myk-export.php

                "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

                Comment


                • PrintDriver
                  PrintDriver commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Converting to CMYK or leaving original color space is a designer/printer discussion that needs to take place.
                  It isn't considered ''bad practice'' to convert to CMYK. But converting to the 'right' CMYK is what is important. If the print process involves profiling using a specific or proprietary output profile, then yes, having the rip do it from an original source image is possibly the better way to go. It isn't always necessarily the best though. Machines don't do everything right, software can't anticipate every possible output reaction, and more often than not there will be a bad adjustment.

                  Also not every print shop is ISO or GRAcol certified. If you want to stick to just those shops and to only what they can do, that's fine too. But when you have to work with different print shops all over the world that are doing unconventional print processes on unconventional materials, it is best to talk about image output up front and ask THEM what THEIR best practice is for converting images. Most cases it's just a matter of actually RTFSS (Read The F* Spec Sheet.) Other times it might require a little back and forth and possibly (OMG!) a hard proof sent in the overnight mail. It all depends on how important the project is to you. And to your client.

                  These days a lot of people no longer care about quality so much as getting something done fast for the least amount of effort. They'll put up with a slightly dark or slightly washed out photo or two just because they have no more time to make it right or to proof it for a check. If you have a good relationship with a good printer and can trust them to accurately output your images from a different profile than the output device, consider yourself lucky. Of all the vendors I have, there are only two that I would trust to go no-proof. Someday we might move into the space age where sensors and computers can accurately output color imagery. There have been major advancements in the past several years on the science of color control in printing. But we ain't there yet.

                  (remember too that I am in a weird corner of the industry. Your mileage may vary.)
                  Last edited by PrintDriver; 12-02-2017, 08:07 AM.

                • B
                  B commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Hank, you must consistently work with higher-end printing companies than I do.

                  I think what you've said might be more universally true down the road as more printers gear their equipment and routines to accommodate this workflow. Many of the low-bidder printers I work with, however, would either send the job back to me for conversion or charge an extra pre-press fee.

                  As I mentioned, I like to see the results of the RGB to CMYK conversion so I can make tweaks to the CMYK if needed. Not being happy with PDF image colors on conversion during output means I need to go back a few steps and tweak things, whereas I could have caught the problem earlier as I was working with the photo. Letting the RIP handle the conversion removes all possibilities for tweaking.

                  I see no real advantages to conversion upon output from InDesign, and advantages with RIP conversions are only there when a quality-oriented CMYK offset printer is set up to handle things this way. Digital printing is another matter, of course, since it's not usually constrained by 4-color limitations, but even then, it's best to discuss the issue with them prior to sending the files.

              Search

              Collapse

              Sponsor

              Collapse

              Incredible Stock

              Latest Topics

              Collapse

              GDF A division of Mediabistro Holdings Adweek | Mediabistro | Clio | Film Expo Group Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy Copyright 2016 Mediabistro Holdings
              Working...
              X