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  • How to add a blue shiner under black?

    I have been sent some artwork which is gray scale (solid black background and B/W images) They want to make the black deeper buy adding a blue shiner to bring out the black.

    My question is how do you set this in indesign so it is a 2 colour print?

    Appreciate any help.

  • #2
    Open photoshop and change it to CMYK mode and a blue bump into your black.
    Professional Pixel Pusher Designing the world around you. | Working daily to reach 10,000 hours of practice.

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    • #3
      Blue Shiner?

      Comment


      • #4
        I THINK he is referring to a black bump / kicker (40, 0, 0, 100)
        Professional Pixel Pusher Designing the world around you. | Working daily to reach 10,000 hours of practice.

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        • #5
          Heh heh, I'm sure you're right, just never heard it called that before.

          I think you would want to separate the background first and only apply it to that. It could cause some funky looking problems in the photos otherwise. You could do it all in ID too. Just change the black background color to 100K and whatever &#37; cyan

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Kool View Post
            Blue Shiner?
            I was thinking they wanted to make it look like the Tareyton commercials.

            Comment


            • #7
              Put a 40 or 50&#37; cyan below the the black area in InDesign. Black is set to overprint, so having the cyan below the black will bring out the black more.

              Or add 50% cyan to the black in photoshop (as said in earlier)

              "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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              • #8
                It almost sounds like he want to run this as two plates. A blue spot-under with black overprint?

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                • #9
                  ^^^ That's what I got too.

                  Why would he want to take it to PS and rastorize it? I assume since it is done in InDesign that the black background is just a filled black box. Just make it a two color rich black.

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                  • #10
                    Here's a screen shot

                    Click to make bigger



                    So basically the black can come out with a neutral looking colour if just used on it's own - it's not really black but a mish mash of the colour in the background (because inks are transparent not opaque, and black is always set to overprint where it just prints the black right on top of the colour behind it (in this case red), where the other option would be to use a knockout for the black (undesireable) basically the shape that the black area covers there would be no ink printed behind it, so the black prints on white paper instead of ink, then you have to worry about getting the right trapping for it so it's troublesome to knockout black).

                    You can control the shade of the colour, in cool, warm, or rich black (really deep black).

                    In the example the background is red so the Normal one looks the same as the Warm Black one because I used a warm mix of magenta and yellow with the black (it's similar) but using different colour backgrounds you get different results for the Normal.

                    Cool Black is a mixture of cyan comes out cold looking, I wouldn't use that for a sunny magazine where you need black text

                    And then the Really rich deep black, I wouldn't use that where there was small sized type knocking out the black (because it would be very hard to register the colour type (print one on top of the other http://www.claudiamccue.com/2009/03/...-registration/


                    Typically I'd go with the CYAN because blue has the widest em range and therefore better on the eye than say the red or orange black because that's a narrower em field.

                    So there ya go
                    Last edited by hank_scorpio; 03-23-2009, 02:44 PM.

                    "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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                    • #11
                      To put it into practice! That's the key isn't it?

                      Well below is another screen shot and it's a bit wild but it illustrates the problem with just using normal black instead of a mixed swatch like I did earlier (see post #10 here http://www.graphicdesignforum.com/fo...1&postcount=10)




                      Notice the difference in the blacks as it hits the white area - and notice the background colour when on the image. I used the same percents as the first time around.
                      Last edited by hank_scorpio; 03-23-2009, 03:17 PM.

                      "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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                      • #12
                        Be careful with that white blockout text; depending on the size of the type, any slight misregistration's going to look pretty funky.

                        As for a giving a blue shiner, I would recommend a sock full of quarters. Bag of lemons would probably work well too.
                        "The 20th Century is the shudder that announces the approaching cataracts of time over which our species and the destiny of this planet is about to be swept." -Terence McKenna

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                        • #13
                          I think the misregistration would only matter on smaller type sizes, which I covered in post #10 too

                          "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by doctorsax13 View Post
                            be careful with that white blockout text; depending on the size of the type, any slight misregistration's going to look pretty funky.

                            As for a giving a blue shiner, i would recommend a sock full of quarters. Bag of lemons would probably work well too.
                            rofl! :d

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