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  • Die Line in PDF

    Have created packaging art in Adobe Illustrator with die lines set as spot colors and in separate layer of artwork. When sending out final PDF to overseas (low-tech) print vendor, how do I make sure that the die line is preserved and not printed ?

  • #2
    If it's in spot, that should be all you need. How low-tech are we talking about?

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    • #3
      Okay, thanks a lot. So just prepare pdf as normal with spot color on vector dieline. When they make printing plates they will see it? Was told that there are some vendors my company uses that don't get AI files, only PDFs. New job, so not sure of all aspects, just trying to cover my rear and prepare art correctly.

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      • #4
        Make sure you set your dieline to overprint

        A safer way would to be put the dieline on the top most layer.

        Then turn off that layer and make the pdf to send.

        Then turn off the other layers and turn back on the die layer

        Then make a new pdf with the die line. And send both files.

        "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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        • #5
          Thank you. Appreciate the expert response. First time using this forum and am really pleased at getting a fast answer.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by eugenetyson View Post
            Make sure you set your dieline to overprint

            A safer way would to be put the dieline on the top most layer.

            Then turn off that layer and make the pdf to send.

            Then turn off the other layers and turn back on the die layer

            Then make a new pdf with the die line. And send both files.
            Why bother with all that mess when you can just send the layered PDF file with the layers panel showing?
            This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
            "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

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            • #7
              A: To accommodate my old design prof's first rule of design production: assume all printers are chromosonally-challenged chimpanzees that accidentally learned how to shave.

              Now, that's way too harsh, IMO -- but it does set the right frame of mind for thorough and clean communications. (And yeah, sometimes a printer will call and ask me what's the deal with the bananas...)

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              • #8
                You guys are great. Awesome feedback. Had no idea I could create a layered pdf, but see the rationale behind sending separate files, because of the chimp factor. Thanks again.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by garricks View Post
                  Why bother with all that mess when you can just send the layered PDF file with the layers panel showing?
                  It's not a mess. It's how some printers prefer to receive files, some also prefer the die cut be with the artwork, in layers or not in layers - you'd have to talk to the printers to see what way they want it.

                  It's a simple few steps to make two separate pdfs and name one "Artwork" and the other "DieCut". Couldn't be simpler.

                  "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Broacher View Post
                    A: To accommodate my old design prof's first rule of design production: assume all printers are chromosonally-challenged chimpanzees that accidentally learned how to shave.

                    Now, that's way too harsh, IMO -- but it does set the right frame of mind for thorough and clean communications. (And yeah, sometimes a printer will call and ask me what's the deal with the bananas...)
                    That too

                    I'va had it recently, sent the artwork and put a red dotted line as a fold mark, so the printers knew where to fold it. And it came back printed with the red fold line, the prepress operator just converted spots to cmyk and output plates. I was the only one that noticed the thin red line, but it was there.

                    Usually I'll send the artwork and the dieline separately, with a small note that if they need the two together they can request it. Usually they don't request it.
                    Last edited by hank_scorpio; 08-15-2010, 06:39 PM.

                    "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I work in prepress and I prefer 1 pdf with the dieline set in a spot colour (that isn't being used) and set to overprint. No need to worry about layers.

                      The prepress operator should know they are looking for a dieline because your order will request it.
                      It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

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                      • #12
                        ^ See? My prof was absolutely wrong!

                        (And that's the way I normally do it with my very smart and very professional vendors. It's the ones you can't reach directly or at all where you have to do whatever you can to make sure things are clear. Even then it's a crapshoot.)

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                        • #13
                          I was beginning to think I'm leading a charmed life. I talk through the job with the rep* beforehand. I deliver a layered PDF. I get a proof back from the quite smart and sharp prepress guys that clearly show the dieline and that it will not print. A few days later I get a perfect printed piece. Easy-peasy.

                          *I deal with three printing companies for diecut stuff. Rep for company #1 is the owner and a lifelong friend, from like grade 2; Rep for company #2 is VP of sales and a co-owner; Rep for company #3, a family-owned company, is the president and head of sales. I never have a problem. As the Knight from Indiana Jones would say, I "have chosen well."

                          As we say around here all the time, good communication with your printing company is key.
                          This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
                          "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I do have good communication with the printers. They say to me "yes we know how you want it" and it still comes back wrong, and I've had other people check what I sent over and they get it straight away. A lot of the time I don't have the luxury of a mock-up sent out to me because of really tight deadlines. For example, I was given a 104 page Word document to be created into a new book and was asked if it would take half a day or a day to complete. I spent half a day creating a template and setting the first 16 pages, then handed that off for layout to be okayed for I continued. I have the joy of working on that today, and it has to be up on the website today or tomorrow as a download, absolutely no planning from the people above me.


                            I have absolutely no problem in sending a layered PDF, or sending a PDF with a spot colour set to overprint, or sending the artwork and the die line as two separate files. I think all 3 are totally acceptable workflows.


                            But going on what the OP said
                            Have created packaging art in Adobe Illustrator with die lines set as spot colors and in separate layer of artwork. When sending out final PDF to overseas (low-tech) print vendor, how do I make sure that the die line is preserved and not printed ?
                            So the first thing to do is contact the printers and see if they want it as a single file, or as a layered pdf or as separate files. I think if it's going to be sent overseas the liklihood of a proof is probably slim? Right? So ensuring that there are no crossed lines of communications, and assuming that the printer is LOW-TECH then sending artwork and dielines separately seems an adequate solution.

                            Of course, I would try to talk with the printer myself before sending any artwork.

                            "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My only fear with dielines on separate files is the possibility the die and art were created separately. A good prepress person will merge the files to assure the die will work with the art. Many times I've done this only to find out the separate die file will not work with the separate art file because they created the die and art separately, not together and then separated. However, merged die and art files one can see immediately whether it'll work or not.
                              WYSIWYG

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