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  • bleeds

    i've been told all through out school to put bleeds on my work. i've been told that for printing there has to be bleeds.

    my question is, when there is a bleed, and the file is printed, then it always leaves a white border around the art that has to be removed. So if this happens and the art goes to the edge of the composition, then why put a bleed? cant there be time saved by just not putting a bleed and not having to trim in the end?

    im not trying to be lazy, or take the easy way out, and I know this may be a noob question, I'm just rather confused with this.

  • #2
    If you are printing on your home printer, then yes it will print a white border. This is the home printer's fault, not the way you set up your artwork.

    Bleeds are for commercial printing and allows the artwork to go to the edge of the page. The printer will print things at the full size, then trim to spec. The trimmers are not exact. The bleed is there so that when the pages are trimmed there is no white edging.

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    • #3
      well i ask because I printed a project yesterday at fedex (yes I know i know, thats my first fault) and when it was printed it had the white border. so then is that just a screw up on their part?

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      • #4
        Depends. Sometimes you need to explain to them that they have to print to oversized stock and trim. If you told them to print on standard stock, they will blame you for their printer having borders...

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        • #5
          thats what happened. They told me that it was going to have a white border because thats where it all ended. I told them I had it completely print ready, they gave me a blank look. so i had to revert to talking like I was talking to two year old's. hour and a half later they FINALLY got it. Ill never again go to fedex unless i ABSOLUTELY have to. I found a professional printer right up the street from where I live, im going to try and go to them from now on, depending on their pricing. if its not too outrageous for things, i won't mind paying a couple of extra bucks for high grade results. plus my theory is, if im turning stuff in that is of higher quality its going to look better to the teachers too.

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          • #6
            I'm pretty sure they know their own machines there. It sounds like you don't know how to explain what you want. All copiers have that white border too. You have to print on paper larger than the finished piece and cut it down. The bleed is there because cutters aren't 100% accurate.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by VDM View Post
              I'm pretty sure they know their own machines there. It sounds like you don't know how to explain what you want. All copiers have that white border too. You have to print on paper larger than the finished piece and cut it down. The bleed is there because cutters aren't 100% accurate.
              You've apparently never been to a FedEx. There is a reason the people there get paid minimum wage. If they can't just stick something in the machine and press "print" they have no idea how to handle anything. I guarantee they have no idea what a bleed is.
              http://brokenspokedesign.com

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              • #8
                I think it was just a miscommunication, I don't know. we was explaining it as simple as possible, it really wasn't that difficult, like I said everything was laid out already print ready.

                So a bleed HAS to be used when designing something for print correct? and when getting it printed it should be printed to full bleed? the bleed isn't supposed to be the exact size of how I want it to be in the end is it? Bleeds are supposed to be a quarter of an inch (just for example) wider than the art board, correct?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by infinity View Post
                  I think it was just a miscommunication, I don't know. we was explaining it as simple as possible, it really wasn't that difficult, like I said everything was laid out already print ready.

                  So a bleed HAS to be used when designing something for print correct? and when getting it printed it should be printed to full bleed? the bleed isn't supposed to be the exact size of how I want it to be in the end is it? Bleeds are supposed to be a quarter of an inch (just for example) wider than the art board, correct?
                  If you want the color/photo/whatever to extend to the edge of the page, you need it to bleed. 1/8" is enough. So, if you have an 8.5x11 document, the document size should still be 8.5x11, but the bleed area should be 8.75x11.25 (assuming it bleeds on all 4 sides). If the person trimming it can't get it right with 1/8" of bleed, they need to find a new job.
                  http://brokenspokedesign.com

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cosmo View Post
                    You've apparently never been to a FedEx. There is a reason the people there get paid minimum wage. If they can't just stick something in the machine and press "print" they have no idea how to handle anything. I guarantee they have no idea what a bleed is.
                    I started out at one a long time ago. The pay was better than most other entry level jobs, and we certainly had no problem dealing with issues like this. I guess your results may vary by store.

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                    • #11
                      Definitely varies by store. The one Staples I go to occasionally, I only talk to the older guy there. None of the kids know what I'm talking about. Blank stares one and all.

                      As for the 1/8" bleed, maybe for small prints but for big prints, bleeds go anywhere from 0 to 6+ inches. It's always best to ask the print vendor about finish bleeds.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by VDM View Post
                        I started out at one a long time ago. The pay was better than most other entry level jobs, and we certainly had no problem dealing with issues like this. I guess your results may vary by store.
                        Maybe. I have only dealt with the one here once. But a lot of students at school get stuff printed there, and they report nothing but problems.
                        http://brokenspokedesign.com

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Drazan View Post
                          If you are printing on your home printer, then yes it will print a white border. This is the home printer's fault, not the way you set up your artwork.

                          Bleeds are for commercial printing and allows the artwork to go to the edge of the page. The printer will print things at the full size, then trim to spec. The trimmers are not exact. The bleed is there so that when the pages are trimmed there is no white edging.
                          Actually the trimmers are exact. Once that blade, that will cut through a single human hair if one was to drag it across the blade, comes crashing down, it's exact. Now, presses are not exact and neither is paper straight out of the box. That is why side and gripper guides are important to know when prepping art for the press. For the pressman to know when "work and turn----work and tumble---sheetwise" jobs. For bindery people to know where to begin cutting, folding etc.
                          WYSIWYG

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Cosmo View Post
                            Maybe. I have only dealt with the one here once. But a lot of students at school get stuff printed there, and they report nothing but problems.
                            Ironically, when I worked at a printer near the local college, the students caused us endless problems.

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                            • #15
                              Um, you guys forgot to explain to the OP that the bleed size must be printed on a larger sheet than the finish size. Then it is cut down to the finish size.

                              That's why the FedEx printer couldn't bleed your sheet. You needed to print it on something larger =)

                              presses are not exact and neither is paper straight out of the box.
                              This is so true it should be on graphic design finals. Also note that in the digital quick-print world, up to 2mm sheet shift can occur on lower end machines (KM65xx series, Doc12's, etc). Also about that is possible between screens on some flatbed screen print presses as well. < 1mm in traditional offset. Regardless, I tend to be very generous with my live area borders and keep them at least 4mm (or 1/8") from my trim lines.

                              Good luck.
                              Seriously, read this.

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