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  • PrintDriver
    Reply to How to do this?
    PrintDriver
    I'd think you'd want to be careful that it doesn't look obviously fake, like the first photo.
    The second one is strangely shadowless and floaty.
    The third one is ok, the objects are actually...
    Today, 12:55 AM
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    Reply to Candy Shop Logo
    Buda
    It's a good start. I like the middle one how it has highlights in the text, but I think the drop shapes are way too big. Have you considered working with candy stripes?
    Today, 12:23 AM
  • Buda
    Reply to How to do this?
    Buda
    Yes.

    There are many ways to skin a cat.

    Personally, I would do this in Photoshop so that I had more control of the final colour. Photographing colours can result in differences...
    Today, 12:22 AM
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    Hi Mikko and welcome to GDF.

    We ask every new member to read the threads posted HERE, particularly this thread to get acquainted with how things work on GDF. They will explain how the...
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    I've never used Zazzle or CafePress, but I've bought a few things on Etsy.

    If your CafePress store is doing well, why not sell your Zazzle items on CafePress and see how you go? It might...
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  • Overprinting colours

    Quick question: Is there anything specific to do from the printer's side to get overprinted colours to show up on artwork (digital and press) or, anything specific from the designer's side to mention for it to come out looking alright?

    I got a Cyan and Magenta letter design overprinted one on top of another and it didn't come out overprinted at all during proof (commercial laser printer type)... Just wondering why.
    This is supposed to go to print in a newspaper (print run is around 50,000) and in a magazine (print run at 40,000) - so I'd like to not mess this up if possible

    Thanks.

  • #2
    As long as you have used process cyan and process magenta (not spot or pantone versions) and your artwork is set to overprint (under attributes) you should be ok.

    Most publications around here also request a printed proof to accompany a file. This may be a good idea in your case.
    It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

    Comment


    • #3
      Letters were definitely set to overprint, yes, but the Cyan and Magenta were of different mixtures - not pure Cyan and pure Magenta - could this be the problem?

      Comment


      • #4
        Are you able to post a screen shot sample and a scan of the proof?
        It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

        Comment


        • #5
          No, unfortunately, I'm on the go...

          It's really just a two big letters, overlayed one on top of the other, with the top one being a mixture of blue Cyan and the layer underneath a mixture of Magenta, both set to overprint on a grey background. That's pretty much it.

          The "proof" was just a test run at a small-scale printer using classic laser printers - I just needed to see the layout really, but then noticed the overprinting didn't come out at all (PDF looks fine)...

          Anything else standing out?

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          • #6
            Being percentages shouldn't matter. They should still overprint. However, it could be that the laser printer that they ran the proof on couldn't correctly interpret the overprinting.
            http://brokenspokedesign.com

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            • #7
              That's what I figured, but can I rest assured that printing for on a web press or other won't cause me too many headaches?

              If the colour formula doesn't matter and the artwork is set to overprint, then on the designer's end there's really not much else to be done, so it seems to be entirely up to the type of printer (or press) used in the process...

              Is it just laser printers that act that way in general? I've never succesfully outputed anything with overprinting involved at small shops (black text included).

              Comment


              • #8
                It's hard to say without knowing their pre-press operations.

                It may be easier to create separate shapes out of the overlapping elements and color the overlap the correct combination of cyan and magenta. That way you don't have to deal with overprinting at all.
                http://brokenspokedesign.com

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                • #9
                  so the colours aren't straight cyan and straight magenta? if thats the case, why not set the upper layer to multiply instead of using overprint for the necessary characters?

                  This is assuming its 4 colour process prints anyways...
                  Design is not decoration.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kemingMatters View Post
                    why not set the upper layer to multiply instead of using overprint for the necessary characters?
                    Actually, yeah, I might just try that suggestion, kemingMatters, thanks
                    I don't know why I was so wrapped up in using Overprint...

                    Is it safe to say now that I can rest assured that by using Multiply instead of Overprint, no issues *should* arise on web press? And that the small print shop across the street should be able to output properly as well for a quick proof on layout?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It should, unless it involves a spot color
                      Design is not decoration.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by type View Post
                        Actually, yeah, I might just try that suggestion, kemingMatters, thanks
                        I don't know why I was so wrapped up in using Overprint...

                        Is it safe to say now that I can rest assured that by using Multiply instead of Overprint, no issues *should* arise on web press? And that the small print shop across the street should be able to output properly as well for a quick proof on layout?
                        Again, it depends on their equipment. I know our shop would have no problem doing it, but we've spent a lot of money on our proofing system to be able to avoid problems like this.

                        However, doing them as separate shapes as I mentioned (yes, I know it's more work) would guarantee it would print on any output device.
                        http://brokenspokedesign.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cosmo View Post
                          Again, it depends on their equipment. I know our shop would have no problem doing it, but we've spent a lot of money on our proofing system to be able to avoid problems like this.

                          However, doing them as separate shapes as I mentioned (yes, I know it's more work) would guarantee it would print on any output device.
                          Wouldn't that be unnecessary if you used a PDF/X:1a workflow? You could use any other pdf workflow that flattens transparencies for that matter and be pretty safe anywhere you took it. (I say pretty safe because there are places that would find a way to screw it up)
                          Design is not decoration.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Cosmo View Post
                            However, doing them as separate shapes as I mentioned (yes, I know it's more work) would guarantee it would print on any output device.
                            What exactly do you mean by 'separate shapes'?
                            I've outlined each letter (I have four now - the client made the word longer!), layered them one on top of the other, and have added 'Multiply' to 3 of those letters - am I close?

                            Originally posted by kemingMatters View Post
                            Wouldn't that be unnecessary if you used a PDF/X:1a workflow? You could use any other pdf workflow that flattens transparencies for that matter and be pretty safe anywhere you took it.
                            Meaning that even with PDF/X-3, I would still be OK? (I always send in PDF/X:1a anyway, but I'm curious now)...

                            Comment

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