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  • jessica21
    Steampunk Tea Brand Logo Critique- Trying to choose final concept
    jessica21
    Hello All,

    Background:
    I am making a logo for my boyfriend's tea company, Starlight Tea. It sells high quality loose leaf tea, will have a website, and be in a local cafe (it's more...
    Today, 05:52 AM
  • Buda
    How to cut down on meetings?
    Buda
    I have a client who I am going to design a book for. I met with her about 4-5 months ago to discuss. She emails me each month to tell me she hasn't advanced any further on the project. She's been overseas...
    Today, 05:25 AM
  • skribe
    Reply to Crisp web graphics, how?
    skribe
    It sounds to me like you are hitting a retina issue. When I look at your site the graphics look fine to me on my 25" monitor. I just googled "SquareSpace Retina Support" and quickly...
    Today, 05:24 AM
  • Buda
    Reply to First job out of college, totally overwhelmed and need advice
    Buda
    I have to add, please ask questions if you are unsure. Even confirmation is good so that you know you are on track.

    I have a junior designer that never asks questions. He just battles through...
    Today, 04:38 AM
  • Buda
    Reply to Crisp web graphics, how?
    Buda
    I agree with b, make the images the size you require, then save for web choosing a fairly high setting if that is important to you.
    Today, 04:34 AM
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  • #16
    Originally posted by Cosmo View Post
    Haha... nice. I just looked for the "like" button...
    Oh wow, insecurities arise once again on the Graphic Design Forum, how original.

    So art directors don't exist in motion pictures? On television, on theatre sets? Animators, industrial designers, fashion designers - nothing rings a bell?

    C'mon guys. Be a little more imaginative - you're supposed to be "designers" right? Isn't that part of your job - imagination?

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Clap Clap View Post
      Interesting. Can you give me a little more details about what your process was?
      Meaning, you picked out 4 colour codes from a real Process book based on what was matching closest from what you seeing on your own monitor and then sent those out for print to see which you liked best?

      Basically - put together some colours on screen that I thought worked well. And I knew I could get something very similar to that in a pantone book.

      I knew I'd need the pantone references to see it in printed format in the pantone book and also to give the printers a point of reference.


      When i got the books and matched the closest swatch on screen I wasn't too far off on my percentages, 10% magenta, or 5% in the Cyans - but it was close.

      The print outs were not even close. But I knew I had to get a close representation of that. Which was dificult, because we have an RGB printer, so it's not anywhere close to the CMYk breakdown.


      I ended up with 4 colours - two that were very close to the print and screen, and the 1 colour either side of, lighter and darker versions.

      For the "burgandy colour" ended up with something along the lines of 201, 202, 208 and 216, for example.





      Getting the results on Friday.

      "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Clap Clap View Post
        Oh wow, insecurities arise once again on the Graphic Design Forum, how original.

        So art directors don't exist in motion pictures? On television, on theatre sets? Animators, industrial designers, fashion designers - nothing rings a bell?

        C'mon guys. Be a little more imaginative - you're supposed to be "designers" right? Isn't that part of your job - imagination?
        Art directors exist lots of places. I know one who works in the film industry. He can tell you everything you would ever want to know about all the different cameras, production techniques, software, and everything else involved in movies. That's an art director's job.

        An art director in the fashion world would almost certainly know all about various types of fabrics, sewing, fabric printing, and everything else involved with his or her industry. I don't know any s I can't say for sure.

        The same holds true for printing. It's the art director's job to know about how the jobs get produced. How else are you going to "direct" the people working under you to produce the right type of work? If all they can do is tell people to make stuff look pretty, they are only doing a portion of their responsibilities. I do know many art directors that work in the printing industry. Every one of them knows about the printing process.
        http://brokenspokedesign.com

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        • #19
          Originally posted by hank_scorpio View Post
          Getting the results on Friday.
          Good luck with that and thanks for replying back!

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          • #20
            OK, everybody quit the bickering. Back to spot vs. process, and if anyone wants to debate an art director's job description, start a thread for it.
            This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
            "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

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            • #21
              There is no blanket "best for business cards" print method. What's best for the individual project at hand? Sometimes they want cheap and simple: 1 spot color. Sometimes they want cheap but colorful: these days, full color can be pretty darn cheap. Sometimes they want fancy: Multiple spots, spot UV, die-cut, foil... whatever. It's about what the client wants and what their budget is. That's how you determine what method is best.
              ___________
              Burn the land and boil the sea, you can't take the sky from me.

              blog/portfolio

              Comment


              • #22
                Full color can be really cheap - but you are limited by paper stock with most of the big online printers. If you are doing full coverage - it doesn't really matter too much.

                A local printer with a small 1 or 2 color press can offer a wide selection of paper which can impact your card more than color can. I have seen some really impressive designs in black ink on really nice paper.

                Plus in talented hands - you can do a lot of stuff with one PMS color + black once you take into account screens and overprints.
                Some advice is profound, some is clever. The above post is a good example of both.
                http://www.pedrospracticaljokes.blogspot.com/

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                • #23
                  I'd often put nice paper under the fancy category. If a client wants cheap, nice paper isn't always an option.
                  ___________
                  Burn the land and boil the sea, you can't take the sky from me.

                  blog/portfolio

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                  • #24
                    This problem is normally find. Some customers tell for spot color. So we do digital printing find this color and swap it.

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                    • #25
                      You artists are so impractical

                      I'll let you in on an industry secret.
                      On a printing press getting the colours right is the easy part.
                      Getting the first and last printed sheet identical is what distinguishes a good printer from a bad one.
                      Spot colors are the way to go when you think your card might be reprinted in the future. Ever wondered why corporate logos use spot colors rather than process?
                      Making it pretty and unique is not really the reason, maintaining color consistancy and brand identity throughout all printed materilas is.

                      Packaging is another example, when you have a number of identical boxes sitting on a shelf next to each other you really want them to be identical, it will show if they aren't.
                      This is why you will find ridiculous numer of pantones on packaging.

                      Just to give you an example in the past I have seen business cards of different employees of the same company, same leyout.. in theory, in practice they all looked different. My guess is they were printed at different times, maybe by different printers.
                      It looked vary unprofessional.
                      I'm not saying that spot colors will eliminate all your color incosistancies, but they will minimise the risk, so I suggest you give it some thought.

                      Since this is my first post, I would like to apologise for my bad english, it is not my native language.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by MD View Post
                        Plus in talented hands - you can do a lot of stuff with one PMS color + black once you take into account screens and overprints.
                        This is what I'm currently doing with my cards. It's a very simple design with just black and one Pantone color. Going on some nice 24pt stock.
                        "Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works."
                        -Steve Jobs

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