Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Freelancers! Where do you find your clients?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Freelancers! Where do you find your clients?

    Where you primarily find your design clients? Do us use online services? Self-promotion through door to door? Social media? What do you think is the most lucrative way, at least in your experience? How do you avoid attracting those clients that either don't want to pay at all or the pay they are offering is a joke? How do you go about attracting the heavy-hitters and the fabled client every designer dreams of, the 40 hour per week perfect client willing to pay you what you're worth?


    For me, I used a mixture of online services, door to door and social media. In my opinion self-promotion has gotten me further then any other method to this date. I am still searching for the fabled "perfect" client and wanting to see if anyone else has found that yet. How did you find them?

  • #2
    Originally posted by shanin666 View Post
    ...the fabled client every designer dreams of, the 40 hour per week perfect client willing to pay you what you're worth?
    Reading this, I realize I have that now.

    It's a contract position, doing a relatively complex and difficult engineering communications / technical publishing job that many designers would consider undesirable.

    In some ways, my situation wasn't unlike yours. After struggling hard for about 3 years, a contracting agency placed me in this job that was too far away for too little pay. I had to take it despite knowing it couldn't last. Fortunately, before my arrival the job was being done by an Engineering Technician, and I was able to make significant improvements in the finished product very quickly, and become somewhat indispensable. As the end of the 6-month contract approached, I was told the contract would be renewed, but I questioned whether I could continue with the long commute and its related expenses. It's a complicated story, but skipping over the complications, in the end, with the help of a manager who was determined to retain my services, I was able to negotiate my own contract, dumping the agency and claiming their cut. So I continue, some years later, an independent contractor enjoying an excellent business relationship with a major manufacturer that employs 1000's of people worldwide and values my contributions to the operation.

    So I suppose what I'm getting at is this: There may be more than one way to position yourself for ultimate success. You can't always see the end-game at the beginning, but there are many beginnings to be found. Try everything.

    I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by HotButton View Post

      Reading this, I realize I have that now.

      It's a contract position, doing a relatively complex and difficult engineering communications / technical publishing job that many designers would consider undesirable.

      In some ways, http://www.graphicdesignforum.com/forum/forum/graphic-design/general/1531111-graphic-design-jobs-without-degree?p=1531268#post1531268"]my situation[/URL] wasn't unlike yours. After struggling hard for about 3 years, a contracting agency placed me in this job that was too far away for too little pay. I had to take it despite knowing it couldn't last. Fortunately, before my arrival the job was being done by an Engineering Technician, and I was able to make significant improvements in the finished product very quickly, and become somewhat indispensable. As the end of the 6-month contract approached, I was told the contract would be renewed, but I questioned whether I could continue with the long commute and its related expenses. It's a complicated story, but skipping over the complications, in the end, with the help of a manager who was determined to retain my services, I was able to negotiate my own contract, dumping the agency and claiming their cut. So I continue, some years later, an independent contractor enjoying an excellent business relationship with a major manufacturer that employs 1000's of people worldwide and values my contributions to the operation.

      So I suppose what I'm getting at is this: There may be more than one way to position yourself for ultimate success. You can't always see the end-game at the beginning, but there are many beginnings to be found. Try everything.

      It sounds like it took a lot of wading through dirt to find the gem buried. I guess this is pretty inspirational for someone like me who has struggled for four years to find that perfect client that will make it or break it. Thanks for sharing your experience! Best of luck to you!

      Comment


      • #4
        How do you avoid attracting those clients that either don't want to pay at all or the pay they are offering is a joke?
        You say, ''No.''

        As a freelancer, the thing with that one 40 hour client is, if you lose that client you are pretty much at zero. It doesn't take much. Your contact leaves. Your contact gets promoted. Someone new comes in with ''someone better.'' It happens in the print industry, it happens in any freelance industry.

        Comment


        • #5
          How do you avoid attracting those clients that either don't want to pay at all or the pay they are offering is a joke?
          Easy, just don't have any friends or family, that should get rid of 99% requests for pro bono work..

          If you don't want cheap clients then don't let your clients dictate the price, right? Set your price; they can hire you or not. But if you accept a low paying job then that's the precident you set, from then on they will want to pay that price and their contacts who hire you will want that low price too.

          Comment


          • #6
            Most freelancers use freelance job portals, and their linkedin profiles.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm a student and have been trying a few freelancing sites. I've been able to find some work, but not sure it's sustainable. Hoping as I become more experienced clients will stick with me and refer others.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yeah... I'd avoid those ''freelancing'' sites. Time better spent looking for internships. Or a real world job outside of school.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by axc7552 View Post
                  I'm a student and have been trying a few freelancing sites. I've been able to find some work, but not sure it's sustainable. Hoping as I become more experienced clients will stick with me and refer others.
                  Hi Axc7552 and welcome to GDF.

                  We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
                  Shop smart. Shop S-Mart.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I’ve been freelancing since roughly two days before dirt was invented. The way I did it was through building business relationships. People tend to buy from people, not companies, and usually people they like.

                    Build those relationships by getting involved in the business community. That usually means joining clubs like Rotary, Toastmasters, Ad Club, Chambers of Commerce, et al. Then get involved and become visible. Get on, or chair, a committee or two. Just being a member won’t get you very far. Getting on the radar screen is paramount.

                    Most of us (designers) are, by nature, introverts. I am. Nonetheless, I made the effort to get visible and do a few things. It pays off in the not-so-long run. Start a conversation at a luncheon table. People like to talk about themselves, so that’s a good start. Ask some unintrusive questions such as what they do, how they do it, what their company/business is like, etc.

                    If/as you can, weave in some info about your freelance business during the conversation. I’ve landed several clients that way. Prospect says, “Blah, blah, blah …” and you respond with, “Really? I did something like that for a client a while back … then, describe the problem, your solution and the result. Not a lot, but enough to give the flavor and the idea that you’re a problem-solver.

                    It wasn’t just client types. I hooked up with several non-competitive business who complimented what I do. Folks like writers, photographers, illustrators, account executives and such. A lot of work came through those folks. In some cases, I would be the project manager. At other times, the writer or photographer was. We’d feed each other work. Collectively we acted sort of like a firm or agency. Clients liked that. They got all the value and usually at a lower cost.

                    I hope this helps you out and works for you!
                    All the best,
                    Neil
                    Website

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I hand out my business cards down at the local patent office.

                      Comment

                      Search

                      Collapse

                      Sponsor

                      Collapse

                      Incredible Stock

                      Latest Topics

                      Collapse

                      • StudioMonkey
                        Reply to Software that can do vector patterns?
                        StudioMonkey
                        The step and repeat in Illustrator can do patterns and vary the size and even the rotation, to set parameters or at random. This will give you a vector file but Paintshop Pro and PhotoShop are not vector...
                        Today, 06:23 AM
                      • HotButton
                        Comment on Flyer Crtitique
                        HotButton
                        It's just what I call it when people use an expression that actually says or means the opposite of what is intended; ''could care less'' would be another prime example.
                        Yesterday, 11:44 PM
                      • B
                        Reply to Flyer Crtitique
                        B
                        That makes sense, I guess. Off is the inverse of on, which makes based off the inverse of based on. Got it. ...
                        Yesterday, 08:50 PM
                      • B
                        Reply to Flyer Crtitique
                        B
                        Okay, I know what a colloquialism is, but what is an inverse colloquialism?

                        Probrien, in addition to HotButton's comments, which I agree with, the ad is a bit confusing. Maybe it's lacking...
                        Yesterday, 08:48 PM
                      • PrintDriver
                        Reply to Flyer Crtitique
                        PrintDriver
                        ''Based off'' is inverse of ''based on.'' ''Based on'' is a colloquialism.
                        I think.
                        I have not had enough to drink to play this game.

                        o O
                        Yesterday, 08:27 PM
                      GDF A division of Mediabistro Holdings Adweek | Mediabistro | Clio | Film Expo Group Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy Copyright © 2016 Mediabistro Holdings
                      Working...
                      X