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  • StudioMonkey
    Reply to Two-Page Spread PDF | Background Split
    StudioMonkey
    I always specify a PDF for artwork and if its a booklet I always ask for single pages not spreads.

    Maxal the thermometer looks odd because you have bleed - this gives an extra bit on the...
    Today, 10:01 AM
  • Casseopia
    Reply to Creative Suite and upgrading
    Casseopia
    "I would suggest upgrading to a version that Adobe still supports just incase you run into issues, that way you can call Adobe and they can kill a couple hours of your day and eventually conclude...
    Today, 08:24 AM
  • ISitude
    Reply to Logo tutorial
    ISitude
    There's a follow-up survey found just after the last vid ...I'm guessing that my written answers are also award winning
    Today, 03:48 AM
  • MichaelWied
    Comment on Logo tutorial
    MichaelWied
    Agreed.
    Today, 03:38 AM
  • PrintDriver
    Reply to Logo tutorial
    PrintDriver
    Then change the title to "Getting Started with Illustrator"
    Not "Logo Design."
    Today, 03:25 AM
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  • Starting new

    I wanted to jump in to graphic design but I can't seem to find where to begin with. There's a lot of information in the web that makes me confused. Should I start in "The Basics" or the programs used in making designs? I know it is a long process to master it. But the fact that technology and software improve fast. I may be ending up starting at the wrong side of the road rather than going with the flow.

    Any links that I could start on?

  • #2
    FYI: Going to school is not an option. Expensive and no time for school. Please help.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by pumpador View Post
      I wanted to jump in to graphic design but I can't seem to find where to begin with.
      mmm are you good with a sketch pad? Do you have qualifications? Have you attended the relevant courses?

      Do you sketch, paint, draw? Are you artistic? Do you understand typography, kerning, leading, etc.?

      Sorry to sound negative but 'jumping into graphic design' ... if you don't possess the rudimentary skills would be a bad move.

      Give us more info on your background and skill sets and I'm sure we can help.

      We're a decent bunch round here but quiet on a weekend, so expect more input on Monday!

      Comment


      • #4
        Why do people feel they can just "jump into" graphic design. It used to be a Profession that one learned like any other profession.
        The software and the technology have nothing to do with it.

        If you really can't go to school, look up a school you would like to go to, get their course list for their entire graphic design program, then go find some books (on ebay, craiglist, etc) that will teach you each course and learn them.

        Oh, wait. That would take time...

        Anything worth doing is worth doing right.

        Comment


        • #5
          *headdesk*
          This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
          "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

          Comment


          • #6
            Hey,
            I wanted to "jump into" being an electrician but I don't have time or money to learn how. I'm sure there are loads of websites online where I could start, right?

            Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

            Comment


            • #7
              I am self taught. I also work with top fortune 500 companies.

              It can be done. It will be harder to master than going to a "good" design school. And I say that because many design courses will teach you the program, but not the theory or the technical.

              Graphic design is more than making a pretty picture with a software program. You will need to learn color theory, typology, layout, and a whole slew of things to make you a professional.

              There are many out there who make pretty pictures and wonder why it doesn't print right or end up with a huge prepress bill because they can't set the file up for print correctly.

              Can you do it? Sure with enough time and effort. Can you "jump in"? No.

              Artistic or if you can draw is only one fundamental element. It's own theory of space and relativity will assist you in layout, composition, and if you go the additional route, illustration. Not everyone draws perfect pictures, but everyone must be able to communicate ideas visually and quickly using mockups/sketches. Which may be as little as circles where objects go and wavy lines where text go.

              Not knowing the programs or how to set up the program work area so that your creation will print correctly will set you back to square one.

              We get these questions, on the forum, weekly, where as someone thinks that having a program makes them a designer.

              So where to start?
              This is a paired profession, you have to be good in both theory and practical to make a successful attempt at this career.

              For the Theory: Color Theory, Typology, layout, art history, are just a few of the things you need to know.

              For the practical: Download the trial versions of Adobe photoshop, illustrator and indesign. These are industry standard software. Photoshop for raster photos. Illustrator for illustration, or one page layouts, signs, banners, etc. Indesign for catalogs, flyers, business cards, and other business media.


              Graphic design is visual communication of a specific message. It is not art, it is not making a pretty picture, and it is not something you create for yourself, you create for your customer.

              Jade

              Comment


              • #8
                @PanToshi yes that's my point.

                @Bulgariancalling yes I do some sketching and drawing but not much of idea regarding typos

                @drazan I got your point. thanks for the info.

                Comment


                • #9
                  @ drazan I know its a big challenge but my heart is really into it. I'm ready for that big leap. I think I'll look up onto you as an inspiration. Honestly, here in my country we always or most of the time respect what our parents wanted us to be rather than what we wanted to be. but in the end we feel frustrated because we end up doing the things we don't want. I gueass it's in our culture.

                  I do hope you could help me to become like you =)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I am a marketing graduate. saddly I was force to take it. I wanted to be in Fine Arts. I'm from the Philippines. The nearest school for graphic designing is like 15 hours away (in boat) and going there is very expensive.
                    Last edited by pumpador; 03-20-2010, 04:49 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
                      Why do people feel they can just "jump into" graphic design. It used to be a Profession that one learned like any other profession.
                      as a former writer, I have seen much the same opinion of writing. And edited those people's messes.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pumpador View Post
                        @ drazan I know its a big challenge but my heart is really into it. I'm ready for that big leap. I think I'll look up onto you as an inspiration. Honestly, here in my country we always or most of the time respect what our parents wanted us to be rather than what we wanted to be. but in the end we feel frustrated because we end up doing the things we don't want. I gueass it's in our culture.

                        I do hope you could help me to become like you =)
                        pumpador, I'm not self-taught, and I didn't go to design school. I was an apprentice to a designer, and eventually was hired as a designer.

                        If you're as serious about this as you say, you'll get LOTS of help here.
                        This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
                        "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          School doesn't have to be an option. My degree has nothing to do with my passion for graphic and web design. I learned everything from the internet. There are plenty of articles and helpful videos/tutorials out there that can get you started.
                          www.1020designs.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Does anyone else find it amusing that a marketing graduate thinks he/she can be a designer?
                            Fine arts isn't design BTW.
                            It's going to take as much time or more to educate yourself to the same level as a school would do, I recommend sticking to your profession and paint on the weekends.

                            Let me give you a little background why you are getting such harsh replies. In our field we encounter people everyday(one on a good day) that think they can design simply because they know how to use ms word, or because they "Like it" where many of us went to school for very long hours for 2,4,or 6 years, then worked two years doing crap work just to get our name in the door. And to have someone say they think they would be good at it without any training is rather insulting.

                            With all that said you know what you are in for. But all this time you are going to spend teaching yourself is going to be costly as well simply because you will be using billable hours to teach yourself a craft instead of earning.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I understand where you coming from, in a way.. I work for a small company that makes satellite equipment and one of my jobs is to do in house what we were finding a graphic designer to do (designing ads, business cards, managing the website, some printing on vinyl... etc etc) I took a couple classes in gd in college but I certainly don't call myself a Graphic Designer.. and I try to learn as much as possible about correct formats, so I don't waste company time and money. It's often frustrating, as devoting my whole time at work/going to school to become a *real* graphic designer is not an option. But when I run into a problem I just try to find an answer for it, my company will pay for small classes within reason.. and I have a decent relationship with my local printing company. But a big difference is that right now I don't advertise to do any work for anyone besides my company. Maybe you could look for a job where you could get some sort of similar experience. You could not put Graphic Designer on your resume, of course, but perhaps you could use what you do know to get your foot in the door and get yourself into a position to learn hands on.

                              Comment

                               
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