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  • Logo Design: Would your logo fit on the moon?

    Interesting article: Would your logo fit on the moon?
    This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
    "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

  • #2
    Oh, I'm not buying that one. Far too much hyperbole. Not enough substance.
    I am definitely NOT a believer in the less is more thing.
    Making your logo fit in the moon just ties into my theory that designers are trying to make all logos into round circles with skinnyass fonts in lower case across their middles.

    Give good old-fashioned signage any day.

    Comment


    • #3
      Few people know this, but my personal logo actually IS the moon.

      I know, I know. I just, I just got carried away one night. (Note to all: there really is a surprising difference between low-cost tequilla and the good stuff)

      Full points for staying power though, eh?

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow that is a scary thought ... I like the moon the way it is ... and how would you justify the costs involved ... seriously you would only be able to actively advertise on the moon for what 3 -4 days max?? Unless you designed a logo that grew with the moon ...

        I prefer the idea of the moon being made out of cheese ... I like cheese ...

        Comment


        • #5
          Signage is not the same as a logo. A sign is supposed to display textual information, a logo is supposed to convey a brand.

          Also, emphasizing simplicity and scalability says nothing about aesthetic style. A shiny logo with tiny text would not be able to be projected on the moon. A simple icon that has good contrast, that is easily rendered in B&W and can be recognized from a distance would, however, be able to be projected on the moon.

          There's no single rule-of-thumb for measuring/determining good designs (and most rules have exceptions), but I think this article's approach is a good start. Simplicity is what often separates good designers from bad designers, but with logo designs it's especially important. A fancy new logo does you no good if it's unidentifiable when imprinted on your new product, or if it's not easily recognizable on your business card/ad/stationary.

          I mean, there's a reason why design instructors often stress the importance of simplicity to their students--because it's usually the single biggest pitfall of novice designers. Instead of first coming up with a unique concept and then reducing your designs down to a memorable and impactful image, most new designers put no planning into the designs and just keep throwing more and more complexity on it, hoping that eventually with enough bells and whistles, their fundamentally flawed design will look polished and professional.

          Comment


          • #6
            Man, that's going to p*** the martens off


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            'If we want to be taken seriously as pirates, we need a proper metal boat ... None of this wooden crap'

            Comment


            • #7
              This is why there should be a blog license. What next, can you fit your poop in a shoe box?

              Comment


              • #8
                OOo poop art !!!!

                http://www.heraldsun.com.au/lifestyl...-1225931993056 it's not in a shoe box but it's been painted pretty colours and is set in a clear resin, I guess so it doesn't smell ?? And to fill a shoe box would take a lot of poop!! A LOT !!
                Last edited by LillieStarr; 10-03-2010, 12:49 PM. Reason: Becuase I can't spell diddlysquat ...


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                'If we want to be taken seriously as pirates, we need a proper metal boat ... None of this wooden crap'

                Comment


                • #9
                  Look at her, she even poops pretty. Bloody pretty people and their pretty poop.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I know?? Pretty pooping should be outlawed !! It's just wrong for the rest of us noon pretty poopers to expect so much !!!


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                    'If we want to be taken seriously as pirates, we need a proper metal boat ... None of this wooden crap'

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Signage is not the same as a logo. A sign is supposed to display textual information, a logo is supposed to convey a brand.
                      Hmmm.....
                      That thing on the side of the building with the logo on it and the company name sure looks like a 'sign' to me...
                      I wasn't talking about the SALE! signs in the furniture store windows.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I can see it now in critiques everywhere:

                        Would Your Logo Fit on the Moon?

                        Brilliant way to communicate the importance of scalability.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
                          Hmmm.....
                          That thing on the side of the building with the logo on it and the company name sure looks like a 'sign' to me...
                          I wasn't talking about the SALE! signs in the furniture store windows.
                          Signs can include logos, but that doesn't make the sign itself a logo (although I will concede that there is an overlap).

                          For instance, if you do a Google image search for "business sign", you'll find a lot of great signs. However, most of them would make terrible logos. The ones that make good logos are the simple ones that happen to be just the logo slapped onto an illuminated display.

                          E.g. this is a great sign, but it's not such a great logo:

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What about that sign is inappropriate as a logo for a manorhouse?
                            (I'm not agreeing or disagreeing that is or isn't a logo at this point. It's out of context. Though I bet the sign guy was cursing the stroked letters. )

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well, my biggest issue with it is that it looks like a sign, not a logo. It's also rather generic looking. All the decoration is tied to the structure of the sign rather than the iconography of the logo.

                              The only instances I can think of where a sign can be a good logo are:
                              • when the logo owner is an actual sign maker
                              • when the logo owner is a historical establishment with an iconic, well-recognized sign (e.g. Welcome to Famous Las Vegas, the Hollywood Sign, taverns/pubs, etc.)
                              • when the logo is literally an icon of a sign (though this is technically a drawing of a sign, not signage in and of itself)

                              Comment

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