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An explanation of Raster vs Vector

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  • #31
    actually there's a simple method.

    a pixel is the information set in a colored square.

    how many pixels are packed into 1" is your resolution.

    so for example the formula would be pixels (divided by) dpi = inches

    300 pixels (divided by) 72dpi = 4.167"
    300 pixes (divided by) 300dpi = 1"

    Thusly you can reverse this too:
    300 pixels (divided by) 4.167" = 72dpi
    300 pixels (divided by) 1" = 300dpi

    And lastly
    4.167 (times) 72dpi = 300 pixels
    1" (times) 300dpi = 300 pixels

    The formula is basic algebra - just plug in your known numbers and you get the rest of the information.

    And in photoshop you can take a look at the raster image by going to Image >> Image Size. If you turn on the Ruler in photoshop - the quick method between measures is to right click on the Ruler and then choose which ever to display.

    and I usually design in inches for print and pixels for web. Always set up your workspace first and place things into that. Always resize your images as best can before placing into your main design area.

    Vector images do not have any of these limitations as they are pure mathematical calculations and can be sized to any size without degradation.

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    • #32
      Very similar method of working it out. Anyway you do it it's just basic divide and multiply.

      Photoshop does this for you though - I thought it was important to distinguish between increasing the pixel amount and increasing the image dimensions (or decreasing)



      So lets put it to the test shall we

      nicolanicola

      If you have an image that's 3256 x 1498 @72 pixels per inch what is it's size in at both 72ppi and 300 ppi in the following units:

      1. inches
      2. mm
      3. cm
      4. picas

      "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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      • #33
        ^^ my response wasn't in return for your posting.

        I just wrote it out - got breakfast - then posted.

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        • #34
          LOL - who knew - well there you go plenty of ways to divide and multiply the numbers.

          I'm sure there are many more ways. I look forward to nicolanicola answers though they have a few methods to working it out

          "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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          • #35
            Originally posted by SEP Studios View Post
            I like to keep things simple:

            Raster = pixels
            Vector = curves

            Scott
            makes sense to me.
            http://nonewblack.blogspot.com/

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            • #36
              Originally posted by eugenetyson View Post
              Very similar method of working it out. Anyway you do it it's just basic divide and multiply.

              Photoshop does this for you though - I thought it was important to distinguish between increasing the pixel amount and increasing the image dimensions (or decreasing)



              So lets put it to the test shall we

              nicolanicola

              If you have an image that's 3256 x 1498 @72 pixels per inch what is it's size in at both 72ppi and 300 ppi in the following units:

              1. inches
              2. mm
              3. cm
              4. picas
              Ooh I like maths...
              • 45.2" x 20.8" (72 ppi) 10.9" x 5" (300dpi)
              • 1148mm x 528.32 (72 ppi) 276.86mm x 127 (300dpi)
              • 114.8cm x 52.8 (72 ppi) 27.7cm x 12.7cm (300dpi)

              Am I right? Does photoshop not do this for you though? When I click canvas size, should it not tell me the actual size when the ppi are taken into account?

              When I am changing an image's size, I do just rename the size dimensions in edit>image size (or canvas size) I then expect my images to be the size I set them at (please ignore any pixellation problems).
              Last edited by nicolanicola; 01-25-2010, 12:51 PM.
              My portfolio.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Drazan View Post
                actually there's a simple method.

                The formula is basic algebra - just plug in your known numbers and you get the rest of the information.
                .
                You know, I don't know if you were every taught how to work out speed, distance and time at school, but it was exact same method. I think it was Distance was the top in a triangle and speed and time at the bottom, to work out one you multiplied or divided the other two, depending on where they were in the triangle.
                My portfolio.

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                • #38
                  Have I got it then?
                  My portfolio.

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                  • #39
                    You didn't do the last one

                    "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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                    • #40
                      I got bored
                      My portfolio.

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                      • #41
                        Congratualtions you understand it - except for picas,

                        "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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                        • #42
                          raster images pixelates unlike vector. vector has precise location.
                          harvesting great graphics in New Harvest Design

                          sigpic

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                          • #43
                            Differences raster and vector

                            Raster work start from photo but vector from zero. Thats mean you must idea to start. Recently, I gave a course to my students about these and I put that note in my website. Get it!
                            Last edited by raster; 05-13-2010, 06:31 PM. Reason: wrong spelling

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                            • #44
                              Great explanations on raster vs vector. I get asked that all the time and have clients asking me to vector raster or pixel logos and images, so they may be able to use them on large format printing, like billboards, etc. My favorite program is Adobe Illustrator. The pen and pencil tools are my friends!

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                              • #45
                                I hope you don't mind me posting a like here, but I did a video object lesson on this very subject a while back that I'm very proud of. I really hope you like itI made it for those who understand to use to help those who don't.

                                http://macmerc.com/macmerc-tv-pixels-vs-vectors/

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