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  • Parallel study

    Can I learn graphic design along with B.Sc (Biology) ?

  • #2
    You can, but I doubt a biology curriculum would include courses geared towards design. You would need to add design courses on your own.
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    • #3
      Do a double major. I did that. Took an extra year though.

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      • #4
        What's your reasoning for getting the double major?

        I'd probably suggest sticking to one or you'll be up to your eye balls in student debt. You could always pursue the biology degree and then just start learning design without the degree. If you like design and want to pursue it further go get a master's which usually takes 2 years.

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        • #5
          The OP mentioned in another post that a GD degree is not an option, due to cost. I think they are looking for another degree to pursue that would advance them in design. I could be wrong.

          Originally posted by graphicmafia13 View Post
          In my country becoming graphic designer is tough and very rare, thus there is a less number of worthy institutes, and the fees is beyond budget, even for a diploma course. Some people told me that only the works and portfolio matters and degree like B.SC or B.A in any subject is helpful in getting jobs. While some advised that degree in Graphic Design is must, which is very difficult to obtain in my case.
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          • #6
            Not knowing how the college curriculum is structured in India doesn't make any answers we toss out very viable.
            A biology curriculum doesn't allow much room for art courses but here in the US, All of the college core courses (math, history, etc.) are similar so about half of your studies overlap. Of four classes per semester, one of those was usually an elective and one per year is usually a course from another area of study. With an extra year of student debt, it's quite possible to do a double major. Or a major and a minor.

            Here's the rub though. Employers looking for a BFA (bachelor of fine art) or a BA (bachelor of arts,) aren't looking for a BS (bachelor of science.)
            And there really isn't a lot of call for a designer with a biology degree. Unless maybe you get into the medical illustration and book industry. What do I do with my double major? I do production work with very little design. Granted it's fun and novel stuff.....most days

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            • B
              B commented
              Editing a comment
              My wife has a B.S. in illustration from an agricultural university that's known for both its wildlife biology and illustration programs. It's surprising how many natural resources and medical agencies and companies specifically look for in-house designers with biology backgrounds.
              Last edited by B; 05-10-2017, 04:06 PM.

          • #7
            Not to send this thread on a tangent but is it even necasary these days to have an art degree? I did one semester of design school and wound up pursuing music as a major and ministry as a minor. I still design to pay the bills (and I enjoy it) and maybe in the beginning I got turned away because of the lack of degree but once I built a portfolio and resume I haven't had that issue.

            Obviously India is very different from the US so I agree that it's very hard to give advice. But what about something like a communications degree? You'd have to learn the art stuff on your own but I know a lot of designers with communication degrees because of the over lap.

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            • B
              B commented
              Editing a comment
              A personal opinion: school exposes students to a broad, formal program designed to cover the basics and ensure honest, constructive feedback from professors and fellow students. So yes, I think a formal design education is important for those wanting to pursue a career in design.

              A not-so-personal opinion: lots of companies, including where I work, no longer consider hiring designers without 4-year degrees. No degree equals HR rejecting the application, which means no opportunity to show the portfolio.

              This is relevant to the U.S., however. I have no idea what the situation is in India.

          • #8
            Originally posted by Kdigennaro View Post
            Not to send this thread on a tangent but is it even necasary these days to have an art degree? I did one semester of design school and wound up pursuing music as a major and ministry as a minor. I still design to pay the bills (and I enjoy it) and maybe in the beginning I got turned away because of the lack of degree but once I built a portfolio and resume I haven't had that issue.

            Obviously India is very different from the US so I agree that it's very hard to give advice. But what about something like a communications degree? You'd have to learn the art stuff on your own but I know a lot of designers with communication degrees because of the over lap.

            I have a communications degree. It comes in handy every day. If I knew I wanted to transition into becoming a designer a few years after graduation, I would have gone for the double major (or at least a minor). YES, you can learn it on your own, I did -- but it took me years (and I went back and took some college classes as I could). But it's the much harder way in my opinion. Self study is possible, there are amazing courses and resources available online that weren't when I was just starting out. But still -- it's the practicing (being forced to do homework you may not like or even understand until much later) and peer and professorial critiques that I missed out on. This builds confidence that took me a long time to find.

            Then again, some days I wish more designers had a second communications or marketing degree. There's a lot of overlap, and some designers really miss out on the HELLO, THIS IS THE WHOLE POINT stuff, and graduate with big egos and zero real understanding of why they're even doing what they're doing.
            You can fool some of the people all the time, and those are the ones you want to concentrate on. --GWB

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            • #9
              Thank you everyone for giving your precious suggestions, I only had one doubt left, Is there a need of Graphic Design degree to become a freelance graphic designer ??

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              • #10
                Again, I have no idea what it's like in India. I can only give a U.S. perspective.

                Young beginners wanting to become graphic designers often seem to have this mistaken idea that university studies are just about getting a diploma, which to them is a ticket to a job. What they often fail to realize is that the diploma is really just the proof that they've successfully completed the coursework and learned the basics they need to know to begin their career. It's the coursework, the learning, the criticism and the growth that happens in school that matters; it's not the receipt (diploma) they give you when you're done.

                In other words, you actually learn things in school that makes it possible for you to do the work and become more than just an amateur who doesn't know what he's doing. The whole point of school is to learn things that are difficult to learn on one's own. When you graduate from a design program in a university, you're a much, much better designer than when you first enrolled. A graduate still has a lot to learn, but at least he or she has the basics to begin a career. Without that education, you're still just a struggling amateur stumbling over your mistakes and lack of knowledge and ability.

                Just my opinion, but it's nearly impossible to become a good graphic designer on one's own. I'm not saying that a formal education is the only way there (although that's becoming increasingly the case in much of the world). It's also possible to learn in a working or mentoring situation where you're surrounded by co-workers who can tutor you and guide you along. Perhaps that's the case in India -- I just don't know.

                So no, it's not "necessary" to have a design degree to become a freelancer. However, it is necessary to have a bit more than the basics learned to freelance successfully. Could you become a professional biologist without the training and understanding of the subject matter. Could you just decide to become a carpenter or an engineer or a diesel mechanic without having the training to develop the expertise necessary to do the job adequately? Learning graphic design is really no different.

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