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Please critique this art / tee shirt. Please be honest, thanks.

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  • Please critique this art / tee shirt. Please be honest, thanks.

    Hello GDF. I look forward to your advice. I am "self taught" with much to learn, no graphics schooling or college. In the south east there are lots of screen printing companies. Six months ago I landed a full time design job and I love every second of it. Now, about this piece.. I am interested in doing more than clothing and separations some day, I enjoy making beautiful things. This was inspired by a piece I saw some time ago with flowing ink, wish I could give more due credit. I wanted to make something pretty, thought provoking, something you enjoy looking at. I threw it on a shirt because, why not. Be honest and brutal but also helpful if you can. Mods, yes I've read both threads you link as well as the crit pit FAQ. Thanks for your time everyone.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    This is Art, not so much Graphic Design. Pretty much, if it pleases you, it accomplishes its purpose.
    If it sells on a shirt, even better.

    I'm lost as to the symbolism of it, I suppose it could mean several different things to different people.

    On a shirt, there is a bit much going on to see the fine detail of it. I'm assuming if you work in a shop, you have some method of putting this on a shirt, fuzzy drop shadows and grunge and all.


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    • #3
      Capturing that fine detail could be an issue for many t-shirt printing applications. You could get this into 2 colors for silk screening. Those new full color heat transfer applications will have a terrible time weeding the image between those tiny, tiny birds.

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      • #4
        Hi Jake and welcome to GDF.

        We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
        Shop smart. Shop S-Mart.

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        • #5
          oh, this is either 4-color process or DTG.
          At least for me...
          The linescreen I'd have to use on that to do it as spot colors would be darn ugly.
          But we don't do t-shirt screening for a reason. We leave it to the pros set up for that stuff.

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          • #6
            I think the linescreen would be beautiful It's grunge anyway, right?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
              This is Art, not so much Graphic Design. Pretty much, if it pleases you, it accomplishes its purpose.
              If it sells on a shirt, even better.

              I'm lost as to the symbolism of it, I suppose it could mean several different things to different people.

              On a shirt, there is a bit much going on to see the fine detail of it. I'm assuming if you work in a shop, you have some method of putting this on a shirt, fuzzy drop shadows and grunge and all.
              Thank you PrintDriver! It does make me happy to look at, I hope some others may feel the same. Yes we can do this on a shirt. We do more complicated prints than this one about every day here. It is nice to hear from another who I assume is in/ has been in the printing business. Your input is always welcome.

              Edit: Sorry, I keep thinking about one part of your post and I had to ask about it. What exactly do you mean by art but not graphic design? I'm honored you called what I did art, I just wonder why what you said is true. Night after night I put pieces of this idea together slowly in my mind. Then spent a few hours bringing it to reality. No clipart/etc.. Everything was brushed with free brushes from other artists and a few I made.

              I think you may be right, because in the image with no shirt I did it differently. I added small bits of detail I wouldn't ever put on a shirt, or at least not for this piece. The blue lighting coming from the top left, the orange light coming in right, that would look terrible. What I am trying to say is, I made something I wanted people to look at and say "That is beautiful.." instead of making something of any real-world use.

              I think the linescreen would be beautiful It's grunge anyway, right?
              You could call it grunge. I started learning PS at age 13, now at 24 I find the 90's played a huge role in the style of art I love to make.

              oh, this is either 4-color process or DTG.
              At least for me...
              The linescreen I'd have to use on that to do it as spot colors would be darn ugly.
              But we don't do t-shirt screening for a reason. We leave it to the pros set up for that stuff.
              I have only worked with my company for 6 months now, I have yet to do a 4-color process but I hope to soon. I would have them run every color on 305 mesh screens and after tweeking the separations I am sure this would turn out really great looking.

              Also, I am curious as to what you print if not shirts? Feel free to PM if you want. If anyone is interested, I may separate this one day and if anyone would like to look it over and give some advice or just see how I do my separations? Just a thought.

              Anyway, thanks for your thoughts so far everyone!
              Last edited by JakeThief; 08-30-2017, 12:01 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JakeThief View Post
                What exactly do you mean by art but not graphic design?
                Not necessarily answering for PrintDriver directly, but here, we generally distinguish between art and graphic design in that graphic design is undertaken and formulated with a specific objective—most typically a business objective. There may be information to convey, a message to instill, an association to foster, among the members of a business' market or the prospective audience of an event, for instance. Aided by research of the business and its markets, the graphic designer delivers specifically targeted content or material aimed at producing a particular, predetermined, and measurable reaction in the audience. Perhaps the message is to trade in your car, or attend a sales presentation, or tighten a critical screw to a certain required minimum torque. Obviously, those are just several of many possible examples.

                Art, or the other hand, isn't predicated on a fixed and targeted message in the same way. It doesn't have to produce any particular reaction in the viewer, and in fact, the greatest works are lauded for producing a variety of reactions as the sight of them mixes with the viewer's respective individuality. Your tee shirt graphic is a good example of art. It doesn't have to say anything to anyone. If they like it, it's good to them, and if they don't, it isn't. It might remind PrintDriver of a missed old girlfriend while simultaneously reminding me of the myocardial infarction I suffered in '95. SeeWhatImean?
                Last edited by HotButton; 08-30-2017, 01:22 PM.
                I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by HotButton View Post
                  *words*
                  Very well put, sir. Thank you for that. Now I see what you all meant, yes this was an art piece. All I do most every day is design, so I like this chance I had at art and wanted to share it with you all. These forums are great. This is the most that anyone has shared honest opinion about my work, since I have been in the industry.

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