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Critique: Business Card/Logo for Toy Dealer

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  • Critique: Business Card/Logo for Toy Dealer

    Here is a business card and logo with variations I'm working on, designed in trading card size (2.5"x3.5"). It's not finalized, and I'd appreciate some constructive criticism. The design is themed toward vintage action figures (think He-Man, G.I. Joe, and Super Powers). The front simulates a figure package while the back has a cut-out "file card" like a G.I. Joe would have. I'm pretty happy with all of it. My main concern is if I should abandon the stars in the logo. Also, I still have to increase the black border for the bleed.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    You do realize this is a custom sized ''business card,'' right? And won't fit in standard business card holders. Or a wallet for that matter.
    No one is going to cut down the card to fit.
    It's more novelty than functional.
    The black border you have is already smaller than the standard safety. Some or all of it could be cut off in finishing.
    The client is ok with this representation of his person? It really isn't all that flattering and certainly lacks the standard superhero/action figure 8-head height proportions.
    Not sure how the client intends to use the card. To the trade? Or just to customers at the shop and at shows? I collect comics, well...one, an old and obscure one, and have visited a lot of places searching for them. This just strikes me as lacking a certain amount of sincerity and maybe is a tad hokey, even in that industry.


    Comment


    • #3
      Boy howdy! I've shown this to many people, artist and toy enthusiast alike, and you're the one and only person to show disfavor, as well as have absolutely nothing positive to say.

      Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
      The black border you have is already smaller than the standard safety. Some or all of it could be cut off in finishing.
      Thanks, but you do realize I acknowledged this issue, right?

      Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
      The client is ok with this representation of his person? It really isn't all that flattering and certainly lacks the standard superhero/action figure 8-head height proportions.
      Oh yeah? I'm a lifelong comic book and toy enthusiast, so I have to ask: Where did you get this 8-head scale idea? Super Powers Collection, which my art was inspired by, is a firm 7-head scale. Modern Star Wars is too. And the classic 3 3/4" G.I. Joe is a mere 6 1/2-head scale.

      Stating that this is an unflattering depiction, again, you're alone in voicing that opinion. I wanted him to bear his likeness but also have enough of that rigid, buff look to read as an action figure. If you want to argue that he isn't heroic enough, then we might as well say he also needs a full costume with cape and chest emblem. That's simply not the route I wished to go, and it's not the one and only appropriate route. The job of a graphic designer oftentimes challenges us to think outside the box and finding creative solutions that stand out from the pack. I've accomplished that here to overwhelmingly positive feedback.

      Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
      Not sure how the client intends to use the card. To the trade? Or just to customers at the shop and at shows? I collect comics, well...one, an old and obscure one, and have visited a lot of places searching for them. This just strikes me as lacking a certain amount of sincerity and maybe is a tad hokey, even in that industry.
      What are you saying? I should talk him out of even having a business card and therefore talk myself out of a project?

      As both an artist and lifelong toy enthusiastic, hearing that this design lacks sincerity sure is puzzling. My fellow toy enthusiasts and I are able to have a sense of humor and fun in our hobby. Maybe you're not, and that's unfortunate. This guy isn't running a homeless shelter; he's a grown man who collects children's toys. Lighten up.

      Comment


      • #4
        Posting the design in "The Crit Pit" invited PrintDriver's scrutiny, and he offered his earnest, competent, reaction. Defense of the design decisions you made is a good and necessary element of the critique process, but "everybody else likes it" doesn't count. The "overwhelmingly positive feedback" you've received elsewhere is nice for you, but in this business you should always be questioning your own judgement and testing your strategy; that's the purpose of critique, and the only reason to post here. If any responder here would have simply added more "overwhelmingly positive feedback," you'd have gained nothing.

        I work with and for Engineers, who I've learned spend more of their time and energy concentrating on all the possible mistakes that could be made when designing something, in order arrive at something which doesn't exhibit the flaws that would result from those mistakes. In their workflow, as it is, or should be, in graphic design, thorough and objective consideration of what could be wrong here, both tactically and mechanically, must be valued. If you don't value that, and the critique process which fosters it, you're undoubtedly delivering mistakes to your clients.

        Perhaps your design is spot-on. Neither you, nor me, PrintDriver, the client, fellow hobbyists, etc., could possibly really know whether it is. But, the fact is, you, the client, and "friends" are the most susceptible to infatuation with it, and in the worst position to judge.
        I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

        Comment


        • #5
          My critique in the crit pit is only my opinion.
          Whether or not you agree, that option is up to you.
          The Crit Pit isn't Mom's Fridge. That no one else opted to comment initially, says something in itself.
          Perhaps you will get more comments now that the thread’s been resurrected.

          You mentioned increasing the Bleed side of the black border. Not the Safety side. All the bleed in the world doesn't help when the trim invades the safety.

          Marvel is 8 to 8.5 heads, at least it was back in the 80s. Seems to change with decades.

          I certainly wouldn't suggest your client go cardless. I'm just saying an off-sized business card that requires scissors to fit in anyone's standard physical card storage holder (as opposed to a smartphone app) is a tough sell on the receiving end. Doesn't do your client any good if it gets binned, which might possibly happen with a Trade contact. On the other hand, it is a novelty and would probably go over well with the customers in a toy show-type environment. Though it may not end up where intended. That's why I asked its purpose.

          If your client loves it, great. Cash in.
          Does he get his ROI? Get back to us on that part. That is the measurement of a design's success.
          Last edited by PrintDriver; 09-13-2017, 01:02 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            You asked for a critique, but based on your reply it sounds like you just want praise.

            I will give you my two cents if you are interested in a critique:

            I get the idea of the card being a traditional trading card size. I know the complications of the card size have come up, but I think it is relevant and creative that this business would deliver a business card at a trading card size. However, I feel like the whole purpose of the trading card size is lost by the action figure design. If you would have gone with the approach of making the owner's card into something similar to a pokemon or Magic card, then the creativity and purpose behind the size of the card would hold up. Seems pointless to use that card size for the design you've created.

            Secondly, I like your illustration; nice detail, shading and line work. I would however go back and look at the glares on the pupils. The character appears to have a lazy eye (more noticeable on the front) from how you've drawn the glares.

            I like your overall layout, typography and color scheme. I do get a vintage toy vibe going on from this design. You mentioned removing the stars from the logo. Do you have a version of the card without the stars on the front? I think removing the stars would be smart if you intend to keep the back design the same, as the logo on the back currently does not have stars.

            Comment


            • #7
              How. How have you acknowledge the issue with this black border that is impossible to print?
              It's not a matter of it extending OUT for the bleed. it's a matter of it coming IN so that someone might be able to cut it in a way that it's accurate on all sides.

              Is that cut line meant to be a die line? or do you really want recipients of the piece to cut out the card?

              I'm not unhappy with the illustration work. I think it's quite nice.

              Its's a bit detailed for digital printing. Expensive for 4 color offset - even more so if that's custom die cut.


              Comment


              • #8
                If memory serves, this is the same OP that was looking for options to put a plastic looking spot varnish on an area of a business card for very low cost.
                Presumably the bubble on the action figure.

                The size of this card will make that a slightly more expensive proposition because most of the gang run business cards don't come in a trading card size. This is a special order, and adding a spot varnish would add more $ to the order. I'm guessing the print-a-trading card gang printers aren't set up for spot varnish, but that's just an assumption. Most print reps can find a solution to anything if you throw enough money and time at it.

                Since a "small run" was mentioned in that other thread, maybe he's hand cutting these and doesn't have to worry about any safety, other than missing fingertips with an exacto knife.

                Comment


                • KitchWitch
                  KitchWitch commented
                  Editing a comment
                  If I remember right, the OP did mention only doing the varnish look on a handful of cards for his/her portfolio, not the entire run. I could be wrong.

              • #9
                Just gonna point out one other thing.
                When you take scissors to that cut line this is what you end up with (or you could flip the orientation and get most of the name but not all of it, but cut the action figure.)

                Click image for larger version

Name:	die-cut.jpg
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ID:	21437

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                • #10
                  Good point. Maybe he's fine with having the logo and all critical graphic elements cut off.
                  Surely this has been thought through

                  " oys & ollectibles " They'll figure it out.

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