Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Magazine cover design Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
Search Search Module
Collapse

Advertisement Advertisement Module
Collapse

Featured Images Featured Images Module
Collapse

Mediabistro Creative Sites Mediabistro Creative Sites Module
Collapse
Latest Topics Latest Topics Module
Collapse

  • Juniberry
    Reply to Wordpress theme and plugin help for print company.
    Juniberry
    I should also mention that a theme that supports the visual composer would be excellent....
    Today, 05:54 AM
  • Juniberry
    Wordpress theme and plugin help for print company.
    Juniberry
    Howdy-doody fellas and bellas, I'm just after some quick advice from those of you out there with plenty of experience choosing and working with WP themes.

    Attached is a template/guide to...
    Today, 05:53 AM
  • arielr190
    Reply to Opinions on My Logo?
    arielr190
    the business is online. print-wise, the smallest it will ever get is a business card.
    Today, 03:53 AM
  • lowfatgraphics
    Reply to UX tips
    lowfatgraphics
    Hmm This isn't UX, it is UI... Its common to get the two mixed up but having worked in UX and now UI, there is a pretty big difference.

    Now from a UI stand point, there isn't much here...aside...
    Today, 03:52 AM
  • lowfatgraphics
    Reply to Candy Shop Logo
    lowfatgraphics
    "S" is tough to read-- looks interesting. the glossy highlights seem to have multiple light sources tho...might want to double check.
    Today, 03:43 AM
Advertisement Advertisement Module
Collapse

Sponsors Sponsors Module
Collapse

X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Magazine cover design

    I am looking for critique on a redesign of a food and restaurant magazine cover. I came up with 3 "logos" and put them on magazine mockups and included business cards with each (not to scale here, of course)

    Red is their color of choice, though the color of the "logo" (masthead--not sure what it is called) will change to match the cover photograph of each issue.

    The old logo was very 80s-style, so they need something that will help reach out to a younger/hip audience as well as maintain their loyal followers. The publication is very image/photography heavy. I am attempting to create something that will stand the test of time and not need changing in a couple of years.

    Of the finished "logo", I will provide the following file formats (let me know if I am forgetting anything):
    lo-rez .jpg for web and email
    hi-res .jpg
    CMYK .tiff
    .eps
    .ai


  • #2
    hmmm, don't know if it's just me but can't see the image...just the generic red X icon...IE8
    sigpickeep it simple or simply keep it

    Comment


    • #3
      I can see them on Firefox.

      And I like "B"

      "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

      Comment


      • #4
        IMG reuploaded

        How's this?



        http://www.denisewellenstein.com/untitled-1.jpg

        Comment


        • #5
          gee, I still don't see it
          sigpickeep it simple or simply keep it

          Comment


          • #6
            Magazine:
            Your logo/masthead is much too close to the edges of the page. You will encounter problems when the magazine is trimmed to size. I would keep graphics a minimum of 1/4 inch from the edge.

            I think that on the whole the logo is a bit bland for my liking. There is not much personality to it. It's just a typeface in a color. It isn't very memorable; sorry. It doesn't say food, Atlanta culture or dining. The fork graphic on the card is a nice touch, have you considered incorporating that into the masthead design for the magazine?

            The slight transparency behind the masthead is a bit distracting. It is so subtle that I am not sure if it is intentional or if it is purely to provide so kind of transition between the photo and the background color you have put behind the masthead.

            Will the pale blue band behind the masthead also change with each edition/photo? What was the rationale for putting the background color behind the masthead? Was it just to create a stage for the logo? It looks a little like you had difficulty incorporating the masthead into a magazine cover and therefore chose to separate it with a band from the photo. Most mastheads are designed to work on the image regardless of what the image may be. Look at magazine covers out in the world, and you will see that mastheads read over photos without the need for a background.

            Maybe it is just me, but the cover is not coming across as a magazine cover. Where is the edition information? Where are the call-outs for articles within the magazine? It just looks like a logo placed on top of a photo at the moment. Take a look at magazine covers and you will find that they all have type on the cover featuring the content inside as well as edition/issue information.

            Business cards:
            The url on the bottom of the business cards will most likely be cut off. Keep things a minimum of 1/8 inch from the bottom trim. 1/4 inch would be a safer option. Another thing to bear in mind is that sometimes the stack of cards in the trimmer will not cut "straight" and the band may be uneven or skewed when the card is trimmed.

            Also the card looks like it is an odd size. Is it 3.5" x 2"? That is the standard size for business cards in the US.

            I would recommend you do a little research and look at a variety of magazines. That may help give you a better idea of what your magazine will need to compete with visually on the rack as well as what information should be included on the cover.

            Hope this helps.
            Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

            Comment


            • #7
              The image you've uploaded is in CMYK, which will cause problems for people trying to view it in browsers incompatible with that color mode. I suggest you reupload the image in RGB so everyone can see it.
              "Lucy, you got some 'splainin' to do!" - Ricky Ricardo

              Comment


              • #8
                I think I got it this time

                Here's a RGB version:



                http://www.denisewellenstein.com/untitled2.jpg

                Thanks, urstwile, for the tip.

                And thanks for the suggestions so far.

                Almost all the magazines I look to for inspiration, such as "Saveur", "Food and Wine", "Living", "Gourmet", "Town and Country" and other national food and lifestyle publications use mastheads made almost purely of a typeface. These kind of mastheads seems to stand the test of time. But, I would love to see some good examples of a more 'logo' kind of masthead for a magazine. I guess "Oprah" and "Wired" have done this semi-satisfactorily? Or some ideas of how I could make that happen with "FLAVORS"

                This particular publication very rarely (since 2003) uses callouts on the front of the magazine and has always put the edition info on the spine and right near the barcode as I have done. It is partly owned by the photographer and they like to keep the photography clutter-free on the front. I don't think I will change this.

                My reasoning for the transparent white as a background for the masthead is because when I check out magazine stands, this style really stands out to me. I really like the look of "Architectural Digest" and "Cook's Illustrated". I did not think a solid white background would look as good as a faded background for this mag, and it looked a little "blocky". I would like to hear more comments on why this does or doesn't work.

                I guess, until I can figure out how to make this a more pictorial logo, I would like reasoning as to why or why not to use A, B, or C, any problems with kerning, suggestions for another typeface, etc.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi. I agree that the word Flavor is way too close to the outside of the paper. Give yourself a little more room around the word.
                  For 'B' the space between R and S is too much negative space and doesn't read right. Nothing you can do about it it's just the way that typeface is designed.
                  Keep trying some other fonts.

                  That's great that they don't clutter up the front of the mag. I guess I would move up the photo to miss the bar in the red sauce if there is anymore room on the bottom of the photo.

                  Work on the Forum sentence too, it's looks clusmsy. May need to make it bigger to make it kern better. It too needs more air around it. Nice photo of the Key Lime.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dwellenstein View Post
                    Here's a RGB version:


                    http://www.denisewellenstein.com/untitled2.jpg

                    Thanks, urstwile, for the tip.

                    And thanks for the suggestions so far.

                    Almost all the magazines I look to for inspiration, such as "Saveur", "Food and Wine", "Living", "Gourmet", "Town and Country" and other national food and lifestyle publications use mastheads made almost purely of a typeface. These kind of mastheads seems to stand the test of time. But, I would love to see some good examples of a more 'logo' kind of masthead for a magazine. I guess "Oprah" and "Wired" have done this semi-satisfactorily? Or some ideas of how I could make that happen with "FLAVORS"

                    This particular publication very rarely (since 2003) uses callouts on the front of the magazine and has always put the edition info on the spine and right near the barcode as I have done. It is partly owned by the photographer and they like to keep the photography clutter-free on the front. I don't think I will change this.

                    My reasoning for the transparent white as a background for the masthead is because when I check out magazine stands, this style really stands out to me. I really like the look of "Architectural Digest" and "Cook's Illustrated". I did not think a solid white background would look as good as a faded background for this mag, and it looked a little "blocky". I would like to hear more comments on why this does or doesn't work.

                    I guess, until I can figure out how to make this a more pictorial logo, I would like reasoning as to why or why not to use A, B, or C, any problems with kerning, suggestions for another typeface, etc.

                    I wasn't necessarily suggesting a "pictorial" logo. Many magazines do use type as the masthead. Perhaps a font that is a little more suggestive of the content, i.e. Atlanta, food, culture etc.

                    Just my suggestion; you don't have to change your design based on one persons opinion.

                    Since your magazine doesn't clutter the cover with callouts, that is good enough reason to keep it the way it is.

                    Architectural Digest and Cooks Illustrated don't have a band beneath the masthead, their designs have a complete frame around the photo. I also wasn't suggesting you make the band solid, only commenting that it did look a little blocky despite the transparency. Perhaps increasing the transparency will reduce the blocky look to it.

                    It's your design. I was merely giving you a critique as you requested. It's up to you to decide if my comments are valid for your design, or not.
                    Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      PanToshi: great critiquing, advice and points.

                      dwellenstein:
                      So many culinary mags, ads and just about all related design work, for that matter-- leans heavily on the classical, safe conservative choices. Why? It's an industry that is very heavily dependent on FOLLOWING style trends and passions developed elsewhere.

                      When I work with stuff in this market, I concentrate on executing 'extreme classical' type design and layout and commit whatever I can to the copy for creative interest.

                      But, if the publisher insists on a clean, uncluttered presentation, your look and success is riding REAL heavily on that photo. Yes, the nameplate (what you called 'masthead') will need to have rock solid type and balance (stroke weight will figure very large in how well it works with everything) -- quite a rare opportunity to actually be ASKED to keep it clean and simple!

                      But with so few elements comes a price: in order to establish a branded 'look' that will pull through issue after issue, it's my guess that the photo's style, scales, even subject range, will have to be carefully designed to fit. THAT will be the real challenge. Defining the photo composition/design rules. You look at those other mags and you'll learn that the real design test comes in being able to stick with those kind of rules.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        thanks

                        Thanks. Excellent critique PanToshi and CMYK Girl.

                        So far, I think I am leaning toward C, only because the L is narrow and doesn't leave such a gap as the other two.

                        Good catch on the "Forum.." lack of kerning...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Broacher:
                          That is a very intriguing commentary. I am not sure I am advanced enough to understand all of it, so I hope you don't mind is I ask for a little elaboration here and there:

                          When I work with stuff in this market, I concentrate on executing 'extreme classical' type design and layout and commit whatever I can to the copy for creative interest.
                          What do you mean by 'extreme classical"?

                          But, if the publisher insists on a clean, uncluttered presentation, your look and success is riding REAL heavily on that photo. Yes, the nameplate (what you called 'masthead') will need to have rock solid type and balance (stroke weight will figure very large in how well it works with everything) -- quite a rare opportunity to actually be ASKED to keep it clean and simple!

                          But with so few elements comes a price: in order to establish a branded 'look' that will pull through issue after issue, it's my guess that the photo's style, scales, even subject range, will have to be carefully designed to fit. THAT will be the real challenge. Defining the photo composition/design rules. You look at those other mags and you'll learn that the real design test comes in being able to stick with those kind of rules.
                          SO, because the nameplate will be a little "bland" (therefore needing extensive attention to its balance and "classical perfection"? to kind of make up for its blandness), what is needed to stand the test of time is: a consistency in the style of the cover photograph and how it relates to the nameplate, some kind of common thread in all of the cover photos over time to maintain a "look" that the audience will recognize.

                          Is my paraphrase correct?

                          One more thing:
                          (stroke weight will figure very large in how well it works with everything)
                          Do you mean, literally, the stoke weight of the type--the edge/outline on the actual letters?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Finally, I see it

                            Moving the conversation to the title aside( because there is too much to say) I agree with CMYK Girl that the image placement is off at bit... that red sauce is heavy on the bottom and the image needs to be lifted a bit....I mean, if they absolutely have to use that particular food dish on the cover...it doesn't look like something I'd want to eat....only because of that red sauce...
                            sigpickeep it simple or simply keep it

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Extreme classical? As tight and refined as you would be in designing a logo. ONLY, there are some notable differences-- the current solution has the nameplate hovering over a semi-transparent white bar over the photo, which is low in contrast, shape, and detail (most of that's because of blurring).

                              Now try to imagine the photo-range you might have to cover in a single year with that nameplate. Will it be as tight a 'rule' that all cover shots be closeups of great food? What about people? What about natural textures? Would it work if the shot contained high contrast texture work? What photo colour range would it have to work on top of?

                              I guess one of my pet peeves is when we get outside designers submit a logo or layout design for anything without demonstrating the range that we normally need to cover. Anyone can make nice 'one-of' layouts, the trick is making something that goes the whole distance.

                              How committed will you be to that white box overlay approach? Any closecut (clipping pathed) images to float about any of that text, ever?

                              Why the bottom red rule? And if you think it's necessary, what is the optimum weight for that in relation to the type?

                              The vertical depth of that nameplate block is approx 2/11. Kind of an odd grid (are you using 11 inches and just picked 2?). A big boost to formalize and introduce elegance into layout is to work in a layout grid. Maybe if it was 5 vertical you could bump up the top nameplate space to 1 full row.

                              >>SO, because the nameplate will be a little "bland" (therefore needing extensive attention to its balance and "classical perfection"? to kind of make up for its blandness), what is needed to stand the test of time is: a consistency in the style of the cover photograph and how it relates to the nameplate, some kind of common thread in all of the cover photos over time to maintain a "look" that the audience will recognize.<<

                              Well, yes -- and no. I'm not saying that the nameplate is 'bland', only that it must totally complement the photo layout. No matter what the issue. What decisions you make in its design will effect your future choices and anticipated cover photo styles and treatment.

                              Will a reversal work? How? Other colours? Solid instead of transp backing? Different nameplate backing colours?. An all-white photo background? Maybe that would eleminate the need for the block -- or the bottom line? Hmmm. A lot depends on your ability to work cooperatively with the cover photographer. (ANY possibility it may go illustrative?)

                              Test of time? That's much harder to predict. Shelf-life of typeface choices can be especially difficult to predict.

                              >>Do you mean, literally, the stoke weight of the type--the edge/outline on the actual letters?<<

                              Yes, the stroke weights. There's a tendency for elegance to be translated into the kind of classic Bodoni treatment: extreme range of stroke weights between horiz and vertical. Too thin and you could limit your layout choices (for instance, texture work nearby could bury recognition of the thinner strokes), too thick and you lose the elegance of the stroke thick/thin contrasts.

                              You have to also work with the sub-head weight and (if its used) that bottom nameplate-block rule.

                              Comment

                              Mediabistro A division of Prometheus Global Media home | site map | advertising/sponsorships | careers | contact us | help courses | browse jobs | freelancers | content | member benefits | reprints & permissions terms of use | privacy policy Copyright © 2014 Mediabistro Inc. call (212) 389-2000 or email us
                              Working...
                              X