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Basics of Logo Design

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  • #31
    Vectorized is the way to go. That being said, there's nothing wrong with having alternate "fancier" versions, as long as they are produced in a manner that will guarantee their compatibility with how it's to be used. I suppose it's okay to use Photoshop to create a 'blinged-out' version of an already existing and simpler vector logo for a postcard, as long as the size and resolution are up to par. But what if they want that fancy logo on a billboard?
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    • #32
      This was great, thank you!

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      • #33
        I'd like to suggest starting out with pencil and paper then moving into Photoshop to put together concepts based on your sketches. I find working in Photoshop to be easy and fast. My boss isn't looking for perfection on the first go around, he is looking for ideas. My sketches just happen to be so horrible that Photoshop is needed to convey the ideas. Once a concept is approved I move into Illustrator to begin building the logo. This seems to work well for me.

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        • #34
          I work in B&W when working out a logo because I want strong logo designs. If a design works well in B&W, it will only look better with colour. If you work backwards, it looks backwards.
          It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" – Winnie the Pooh

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          • #35
            Really great thread, newbies and even can learn a lot from this informative source.

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            • #36
              This is so helpful!

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              • #37
                Interesting sticky. very useful. Sometimes gradient too becomes an essential part of a logo. Sometimes the client wants gradient. But rather than calling gradient an instant denial, there is a way around. Just before adding colors and gradient to a logo, first make the B&W version of the logo. If all seems well, then go for the colored version. Gradiant are sometimes problem when we go for print design, specially color seperation process but i have seen logos with that in it. for that very reason in places where you are not supposed to use the colored logo, such as letter heads, news paper, etc this is where the B&W version comes to the rescue.

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                • #38
                  It's awesome

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                  • #39
                    Reading through Logo Lounge to me it looks like that basic rule of NEVER EVER ANY GRADIENTS EVER IF YOU TAKE YOURSELF SERIOUSLY is slowly going out the window. To me there are some logos out there that employ gradients successfully. Thoughts?
                    https://www.logolounge.com/trend-reports.asp

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                    • #40
                      You can always successfully employ gradients in a logo. You just shouldn't depend on those gradients to make the logo look better than it is. Logo design should start with one-color design. Once a solid logo is created, add gradients all you like.
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