Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Kerning Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
Search Search Module
Collapse

Advertisement Advertisement Module
Collapse

Featured Images Featured Images Module
Collapse

Mediabistro Creative Sites Mediabistro Creative Sites Module
Collapse
Latest Topics Latest Topics Module
Collapse

  • snehal_Joshi
    Comment on Business Logo Design
    snehal_Joshi
    A logo is the first impression for any brand, as per my view only logo can create your first corporate brand image.
    Today, 06:31 AM
  • approveme
    Reply to Which of HTML and XHTML works best for most browsers?
    approveme
    What Is XHTML?

    XHTML stands for EXtensible HyperText Markup Language
    XHTML is almost identical to HTML
    XHTML is stricter than HTML
    XHTML is HTML defined as an XML application...
    Today, 05:46 AM
  • it52
    Reply to Your's personal criticism
    it52
    It's cool you have a wide variety of skills. If you've designed for the web, I'm surprised you don't have a portfolio website of your own that you designed and coded. Do you have experience in coding?...
    Today, 05:30 AM
  • justproud2b
    Reply to General Branding (Re-branding)
    justproud2b
    Your right and thank you. I'm going to rethink it from a new perspective (the whole idea). I'm not used to dealing with names that don't have an overly obvious icon or look associated with them so I was...
    Today, 04:20 AM
  • B
    Comment on Graphic Design tutorials
    B
    It's sort of the Dadaist approach to design, I guess.
    Yesterday, 11:48 PM
Advertisement Advertisement Module
Collapse

Sponsors Sponsors Module
Collapse

X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Kerning

    Hey guys,

    I've been looking at this way too long, and kerning was never my strong point. Do any of you see any kerning problems?

    By the way, it's a quote, translation: An artist should not think he is revolutionary just because he is an artist.

    Thanks!


  • #2
    Isn't it rather awkward to have the main focus word of your quote broken in two like that?

    Comment


    • #3
      I Think the kerning works. Its quite appealing to look at as a whole. Its just the small text in blue is distracting and feels like it should be in black (depending on what the focal point is supposed to be)

      The full stop helps add a sense of harmony and unity to this.

      I really like (But i'm only a first year graphic designer)

      Comment


      • #4
        I always check kerning by turning the image upside down.

        You'll spot bad spacing better that way.

        "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

        Comment


        • #5
          Watch the A's the DA and AA combos are a little tight, the leading could be rduced a bit since everything is pretty condensed. The italic word is a little inconsistent also.
          Design is not decoration.

          Comment


          • #6
            Kerning isn't necessarily the problem here. It's just a lot of words coming at me all at once, filling up the whole page. I don't see much design or thought having gone into it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post
              Isn't it rather awkward to have the main focus word of your quote broken in two like that?
              Yep.

              That is much more bothersome than the kerning.
              Heresy is a victimless crime.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm no german expert but we deal with it a lot in my office but I thought you weren't allowed splitting up words like that? Not to mention it doesn't look that great...
                Less marketing douchebaggery, MORE TANKS!

                Comment


                • #9
                  The kerning is pretty good. The verticals are a little tight in places. This is happening in line 2, "MOET" and "NIET" / line 3 "HIJ" / line 4 "MD" of "OMDAT". Some letter spacing problems are "built-in" with a flat-side gothic. The "AI" of "NAIR" in line 4 may look better tightened up.

                  Practice seeing the negative space in a design or line of type. This is something that can be a great advantage throughout your career.

                  I agree with other comments that this should be designed better. If you are using the light blue to emphasize, remember that this light blue has the contrast equivalent of a 30% gray. It doesn't work. The author's name looks like it should line up with the vertical flush line of the balance of the copy. Using all caps with a condensed gothic, I have to assume that you are going for a "ACHTUNG" look with screaming German. With this many lines it is just hard to read. Breaking "revolutionary" is not a good move either.
                  Last edited by sully1251; 05-14-2012, 08:14 PM.
                  http://www.paulsullivanstudio.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for all the advice, I did try to go with a very stark 'shouty' spread, because I think it fits the artist (this is a spread for the artcatalog (NSFW) I posted here a while ago, if any of you remember). And that explains the light blue too, as this chapter is the 'light blue' chapter. Anyhow, I can see how I went overboard with the huge text, so I gave it a bit more space and room to breathe.



                    PS It's not German, it's Dutch. Big difference !
                    Last edited by Leyral; 05-15-2012, 09:02 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Another option is to change the text to a light grey, fits better with the rest of the catalog, but I feel it takes away from the boldness (for lack of a better word) of the spread.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Leyral— You're taken some steps in the right direction. The kerning looks very good. The design is still not where it should be.

                        Try to think of a block of display type like this as a design. Flush left / ragged right looks much better with a more random edge to the right side. The points at which lines 1, 2, 3, and 5 end form a diagonal. This sort of thing is visually annoying—if not disturbing. Also, I would not recommend the italic on "REVOLUTIONAIR" from a design standpoint. You are using a predominately vertical font in short lines. The diagonals of the italic, in this case, look out of place. In a short statement like this, you are better off letting the statement make its own emphasis.

                        Again, if you are trying to have the light blue emphasize the word "OMDAT" it is not working. Light blue is a receding color. You would not use a 30% gray on a word to gain attention — that is the contrast power that the light blue has with its white background. If you must use a blue, try some other versions — perhaps a slate-blue.

                        Take care in deciding on a type font. The font can carry much of its implied personality. All caps in Alternate Gothic Condensed, with tight line spacing, can have all the charm of a no parking sign. In this case it may actually work—making a quotation statement with a touch of authority.

                        The placement of the author's name is excellent.
                        http://www.paulsullivanstudio.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sully1251 View Post
                          Leyral— You're taken some steps in the right direction. The kerning looks very good. The design is still not where it should be.

                          Try to think of a block of display type like this as a design. Flush left / ragged right looks much better with a more random edge to the right side. The points at which lines 1, 2, 3, and 5 end form a diagonal. This sort of thing is visually annoying—if not disturbing. Also, I would not recommend the italic on "REVOLUTIONAIR" from a design standpoint. You are using a predominately vertical font in short lines. The diagonals of the italic, in this case, look out of place. In a short statement like this, you are better off letting the statement make its own emphasis.

                          Again, if you are trying to have the light blue emphasize the word "OMDAT" it is not working. Light blue is a receding color. You would not use a 30% gray on a word to gain attention — that is the contrast power that the light blue has with its white background. If you must use a blue, try some other versions — perhaps a slate-blue.

                          Take care in deciding on a type font. The font can carry much of its implied personality. All caps in Alternate Gothic Condensed, with tight line spacing, can have all the charm of a no parking sign. In this case it may actually work—making a quotation statement with a touch of authority.

                          The placement of the author's name is excellent.
                          Thanks for the great advice Sully, you're really helping a lot. I try to think about all the details, but stuff sometimes slips by me. Like the diagonal line, now that you mention it it makes a lot of sense. I intentionally made the 'revolutionair' italic, to create some contrast with the vertical font, which I think was appropriate for the meaning of revolutionary. But I can see how it clashes too much with the rest of the block. Probably the classic mistake of breaking the rules before knowing the rules completely.

                          I understand your point about the blue text, but I am kind of stuck with that exact shade of blue. The concept that I had in mind with this catalog is that every chapter has it's own accent color, this chapter happens to have skyblue. However, I could see if I could order the chapter differently, giving this a different color.

                          Anyway, I'll play with it some more tomorrow at work. Thanks again.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            About the blue—just to offer you another way of thinking:

                            Keep thinking of this block of type as a design. Perhaps (with the lines breaking differently) you might use the blue on something other than the type. I'm suggesting that you try a couple of different things. You might try a wide light blue bar, the width of your longest line of type, between all the lines. The bar I'm thinking of would be about a third deeper than the depth of current line spacing The type might even touch the bar. You might try a bar that has a solid but slightly eroded look.

                            When you are designing with type, try to look at your work as an abstract design. Practice turning this perception off and on, as it were. Also, keep trying to see the negative space you are working with. Just like an artist working on a painting, squint your eyes as you look at your design every once in a while. This will help you see the work as an abstract design with dark, light and color areas to contend with. When you get stuck, look at your work with a mirror.
                            http://www.paulsullivanstudio.com

                            Comment

                            Mediabistro A division of Prometheus Global Media home | site map | advertising/sponsorships | careers | contact us | help courses | browse jobs | freelancers | content | member benefits | reprints & permissions terms of use | privacy policy Copyright © 2014 Mediabistro Inc.
                            Working...
                            X