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  • Spread layout

    I have these two spreads I did for a newsletter. Let me know if there ok or how I could improve them? I don't know if you can read it, but I know there are a few spots with excessive hyphenation where I could have broken lines.
    I did not post photos because I want to keep the subjects privacy and I block out the name of the school/location


    full_sprd1 by graphler, on Flickr

  • #2
    Here are the other pages.


    full_spd2 copy by graphler, on Flickr

    Comment


    • #3
      The two instances of the text overlaying the edge of an image don't look right. Because it's only done twice (front and back) it looks like a mistake, rather than by design.

      The background image of the front page is badly pixellated.
      "I love deadlines. I love the 'whooshing' sound they make when they go by." - Doug Adams
      LinkedIn

      Comment


      • #4
        Why are the page numbers on the inside?

        I reckon the image is pixelated because it's a screen resolution, probably lo-res preview.

        I can't really see what's going on, but I always turn off hyphenation when ragged.

        "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

        Comment


        • #5
          That back ground image is a linked file and I don't have all of the source files thats why its low quality. I also why I can't edit the document. I showed my instructor and he to mentions the overlapping text wasn't best and that the pictures weren't all centered on the ploroid borders, and the hyphenation. I wanted to see if you guys had anymore critiques for it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hank, the page numbers are on the inside for no reason. It wasn't printed it is in a flip flash version on thier website hosted from an e publications housing website. I guess theres no worry of the page number getting lost in the gutter. Do you hyphenate sometimes, especially in small columns to get an organic rag? I know there is the few hyphen setting and non-breaking hyphens.

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree with everybody else on text and photos. I also wouldn't over lap the title on page one and on page two it looks like your drop shadow is different on the upper right photo. Also to me your bullets don't stand out they just look like the rest of the paragraph.

              Comment


              • #8
                It doesn't matter what alignment you use, you need to pay close attention to hyphenation when you're using it. You're hyphenation doesn't look that bad, although I can barely make out a lot of it. The most important thing is that that aren't loads of hyphens in a row, and that the ragged edge doesn't look too ragged.

                "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

                Comment


                • #9
                  I guess there are only a couple in this article, but I remember it pointed out to me in a couple other spots in this newsletter. I wasn't manually fixing the hyphens when I did this.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here are a few of my personal thoughts.

                    On the copy: The look of the ragged right edge is important in a first-class page set up. Usually a tight ragged right is used, using hyphenation only when necessary to avoid awkward line lengths. This may be dummy copy, but what is happening with the paragraph breaks? in some columns you have a lot of air between paragraphs—in other columns you have about 5 pica indents. I know some of that is supposed to be bullet copy. Also the space between columns looks off. Also, the copy is running rather close to the trim edge without much regard for a margin. There are no excuses for sloppy page set up.

                    You need more sensitivity to spacial and size relationships.

                    The first spread: The polaroid (or snap shot) idea is one way to get a number of photos on a page without loosing white space. I've used it several times myself. I believe that this device is best when the photos are presented in a casual flow— almost a cascade from (in this case) the upper right to the lone shot at mid-left. You are close to that on the right side of the first spread. However, lining up a photo with the flush edge of the headline creates a tension-edge that works against that casual look . The odd sized photo, bleeding at the far left, would work best with a better relationship to other four—rather than square to the trim edge. If you want the far right shot to be an isolated "square-cut", then drop the white border.

                    The white borders are important here. To have them inconsistent is careless and works against your presentation, even if it is a rough. On this first spread you may be better off with four columns of copy. You will probably need a cutline area.

                    The second spread: The handling of the second spread shows little regard for size relationships. In my estimation, the photos should be much smaller with a size relationship to the ones on the previous spread. As others have pointed out, running the type over the photo edge is a gross error. You have placed this casual grouping without breathing room—especially at the bottom right. Also keep in mind that if this was a real layout, someone would eventually have to crop photos in these rectangular areas.
                    Last edited by sully1251; 06-14-2012, 04:57 PM.
                    http://www.paulsullivanstudio.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sully1251 View Post
                      Here are a few of my There are no excuses for sloppy page set up.
                      Thanks sully, I think you made great points and was hoping someone would give me a indepth criticism. My reason for not worrying about cutting and printing because the newsletters only displayed online. I was told parents sometimes print out, from pdf, just the calender pages. All your other points I agree with though.

                      The newsletter is already finished but if I knew about this site I could have posted it when I worked on it. I will make the changes now just so I can fix my mistakes and learn. I will make a new spiral because I dont have source file and maybe put stock photos. I had photos but I don't want to post them here.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        rdan—Good idea. This could be very attractive with an overhaul. You look like you have the ability.

                        When ever you are working on a couple of spreads—work out the design in a thumbnail rough. Things like columns, margins etc should be set up on a grid—even if it is a personal one you create for the section you are working on.

                        If you do a make over, post it. I'm sure that we all would like to see it.
                        http://www.paulsullivanstudio.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks sully, I will post it. I just learnt a recently learned that thumbnails are best. I think that will be faster than how I did it(playin with the items position, scale ect all on computer.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sully, I placed one full line between paragraphs with no indenting. Where it looks like it is when a paragraph started with the name of the school and I blocked out the name. Swiss design says one line between paragraphs so body copy lines up across columns. I think I read some where more or less than a line btwn paravraphs works? I believe I used a porportionally smaller leading for bullit lists-same with headers-so some of the lists line line up across columns. Then I would have added wnough space after lists for next paragraph to line up, is that ok? I dont know if 4 columns per page will work vecause it is set up as letter size document.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Chances are, I'll get second guessed on this.
                              I learned typography from guys who were excellent at designing with type. At the time I could not find a book on the subject written for designers. For 30 of my 42 years all the type had to be specified by the designer and set by a typographic firm or department.

                              Here are some thoughts on your type, thinking of it as a spread for print media:
                              I am having difficulty seeing any breaks between paragraphs. I see the breaks between the bullet copy and they look too open.

                              The distance allowed between paragraphs depends on the point size and the amount of lead (space) between lines. I can't tell on the image you have posted, but let's say you are using 9 pt. set on 12 pt. You should add the size of your type, 9 pt., to the line leading, 12 pt. Thus your paragraph leading would be 21pt. (It would be written 9pt. / 12pt. / 21pt.) This is not a rule written in concrete somewhere. Actually 21pt looks a little open, about 19pt would probably work better.

                              If you are using more line spacing (setting a more open looking column) then the paragraph spacing has to increase.

                              This is only one "formula". Some designers may alter those numbers. One of the things you want to try to do is maintain a nice even flow within the column with obvious paragraph breaks. If too much space is used between paragraphs the text starts looking like it is flying apart. You loose the smooth vertical flow. When dealing with bullet copy, be sure that the bullets are standing out. Use a bullet that is slightly larger that the text point size so it is easily seen.

                              Normally, the breaks between units of bullet copy are about the same as the paragraph breaks. However, if you have units of bullet copy that are several paragraphs per bullet—you may want to add a few points between the bullet units. Also if you have several single line bullets you may want to set them tighter than the paragraph breaks.

                              I've never heard of the idea of lining up bullet units across columns. This does not make sense.
                              Last edited by sully1251; 06-14-2012, 11:02 PM.
                              http://www.paulsullivanstudio.com

                              Comment

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