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  • Illustrator Error Message

    Has anyone else experienced issues with Illustrator displaying an error message like the attached image? I have been doing some digging around and I believe it to be a font issue; however, I have downloaded the font without issue and use it in many other files with no issues. I also am relatively new with AI and am lost when it comes to resolving the problem.

    Any help and suggestions are greatly appreciated.

    Cheers,
    BbN
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Is there a particular operation (or attempt) that consistently produces this error?
    Unfortunately, sometimes these can be like the old joke:
    "Doctor, I broke my arm in 3 places"
    Doctor's reply: "Stay away from those places."

    I only present that because you say you're new to Illustrator. and you haven't offered any info as to what you're doing when this happens. So, there may be some combination of things you're attempting that will choke Illustrator every time. Or, perhaps that's not the case, and if you shut down, reboot, and retry, it will go away. Without more information, all anyone on an Internet forum can do is guess. Nice avatar.
    I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

    Comment


    • #3
      I guess what I'm trying to do would be useful! I'm working in a file where I have text on a path in a circle with my company logo in the middle. I've saved the file in AI (without issue) and now I am attempting to export it as a PNG. It is a large file, my font is just over 1000 pt which I need for DTG printing mock-ups.

      Comment


      • HotButton
        HotButton commented
        Editing a comment
        Ugh. Illustrator's raster export is garbage.

        If you have the suite, and therefore Photoshop, set up a Photoshop canvas of the required size/resolution for your intended output, copy (Edit > Copy) your Illustrator content, and paste it into the Photoshop canvas, choosing Smart Object from the Paste Options. Resize as needed (it's still 'vector' as long as it's a Smart Object), and Save As PNG straight from Photoshop.

      • HotButton
        HotButton commented
        Editing a comment
        ^That said, I'm not sure what you're accomplishing by rasterizing in prep for DTG. If your Illustrator content is vector based, it would be best left un-rasterized.

    • #4
      Hi Blondebynature and welcome to GDF.

      We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
      Shop smart. Shop S-Mart.

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      • #5
        That said, I'm not sure what you're accomplishing by rasterizing in prep for DTG. If your Illustrator content is vector based, it would be best left un-rasterized.
        ^ This.

        Is DTG ''direct to garment''? If so, is .png what you really want?

        Comment


        • #6
          Originally posted by PrintDriver View Post

          ^ This.

          Is DTG ''direct to garment''? If so, is .png what you really want?
          Thank you for this. I figured I would have to switch over to Photoshop at some point, and yes, I have the suite so it's not an issue. I was just more comfortable with Illustrator. Alas, I think the switch is warranted and in due course.

          The platform I'm using suggests PNG as my file format. I will go head and try your suggestion for Photoshop - thank you!

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by BlondeByNature View Post
            The platform I'm using suggests PNG as my file format.
            Feels Zazzle-ish.
            I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

            Comment


            • #8
              Originally posted by BlondeByNature View Post

              Thank you for this. I figured I would have to switch over to Photoshop at some point, and yes, I have the suite so it's not an issue. I was just more comfortable with Illustrator. Alas, I think the switch is warranted and in due course.

              The platform I'm using suggests PNG as my file format. I will go head and try your suggestion for Photoshop - thank you!

              Is there a particular reason why you need to rasterize this?
              Last edited by PanToshi; 04-25-2017, 02:26 PM.
              Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by BlondeByNature View Post
                I guess what I'm trying to do would be useful! I'm working in a file where I have text on a path in a circle with my company logo in the middle. I've saved the file in AI (without issue) and now I am attempting to export it as a PNG. It is a large file, my font is just over 1000 pt which I need for DTG printing mock-ups.
                Still getting used to this forum, thank you for your photoshop advice

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by PanToshi View Post


                  Is there a particular reason why you need to rasterize this?

                  The platform (not Zazzel ) requires PNG format and I can't upload a vector even if I wanted to.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Any online print resource that requires a png would be about the last place I'd use to get something printed.
                    Just sayin'........

                    Comment


                    • HotButton
                      HotButton commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yeah, it's a weird outcome, but faced with the proposition of printing layperson designs applying white ink on black garments, the online direct-imprint-anything-with-your-upload sites like Zazzle have adopted PNG as the raster format of choice because it's compact and supports true transparency, full color depth, and any resolution. It's a front-end dumb-down that gives them the best chance of receiving useful files from the under-initiated. They also accept vector artwork, but don't waste much space on that mysterious concept in the spec.
                      Last edited by HotButton; 04-26-2017, 09:08 AM.

                    • PrintDriver
                      PrintDriver commented
                      Editing a comment
                      After reading your comment, I'm beginning to wonder if we shouldn't adopt the same ''lowest common denominator'' factor here.
                      Would put me out of a job probably, though I'm sure there are ways to screw up even that simple path.

                  • #12
                    I think PNG is required in this instance because the file is interpreted literally by the software doing the direct to garment printing. Thus, if the artwork contains a white BG instead of a transparent one, that white square or rectangle will print as a big block.

                    I wouldn't think you should HAVE to go to Photoshop since Illustrator has an export to PNG function. I would be more apt to suspect that the font cannot be arced onto the curve and left that way. The ability for that to happen is part of Illustrators internal programming. If you were printing it out directly to a sheet of paper, Illustrator would use postscript to communicate with the printer and the text on the curve would print accurately. What I'm saying here is that the VISUAL you are seeing on screen with the text following the curve is POSTSCRIPT. Postscript is for print only. In order to allow Illustrator to export to PNG accurately, the text cannot be interpreted from Postscript language. You must convert it to vector first. The export function should work after you do that. This is a common issue in the industry...I have been creating art for screen print, textile for about 30 years now. ALL my print houses require vector art, with outlined fonts.

                    I typically keep TWO versions of the same art. I save my original that is using native postscript fronts, then I create another identical file, outline all the fonts and add this to the end of the file name _OL...which means OutLined. This way I still have the original file containing editable fonts for date and text changes, but the print house is getting exactly what they need to produce the job.

                    RotaryClubPicnic_2012_finalart_onblueshirt.ai

                    RotaryClubPicnic_2012_finalart_onblueshirt_OL.ai
                    Last edited by BillZ; 04-28-2017, 10:22 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      Originally posted by BillZ View Post
                      I wouldn't think you should HAVE to go to Photoshop since Illustrator has an export to PNG function.
                      Right, you don't HAVE to take it to Photoshop, but try it 20 times, then try direct export 20 times, and then decide for yourself which result is more worthy of your workflow.
                      I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        There's software that recognizes a white background square as a full coverage white ink layer in a png file? I don't do a lot of silkscreening, but I do a lot of white ink printing and it is always a manual step to add in the white ink underspot (or overspot as the case may be.) While the white might print in-line, it's always a separate layer.

                        I'm all for supplying to the printer the format they need to produce your work. But if there are choices other than png, then png is definitely not the best choice.

                        I do a lot of textile work too, and a lot of direct to board printing that includes the use of white ink. The software for the board printers doesn't recognize white (paper) as a color unless you do a sep and assign it. As for text, on stuff like this, vector is always better. As long as there aren't so many points defining it that it chokes the rip.

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