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  • Favourite Blackletter font (and why)?

    I don't have a particular favourite Blackletter font myself, so I wonder whether other could list their and possibly why.

  • #2
    Hi Myrtonos, welcome to the forum! I hope you'll find it useful and fun here.

    I don't really have a favorite Blackletter font, in my line of work (health care) I really don't have the opportunity to use them.

    We ask all new members to read the threads posted HERE and HERE. They explain how the forum runs, the rules, frequently discussed topics and our inside jokes.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Myrtonos View Post
      I don't have a particular favourite Blackletter font myself, so I wonder whether other could list their and possibly why.
      Does anyone really have a favorite blackletter face?

      Elsner+Flake's Fraktur is nice. Yeah, it's my favorite, I guess. It's nice and even and well-proportioned. Then again, maybe it's too perfect. Shouldn't blackletter faces be just a bit crude given the technology of the period in which they were widely used?

      Some of the Uncial variants are nice too, although I'm not sure if they'd be considered blackletter. I don't have a favorite Uncial.

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      • #4
        Unical is not Blackletter, but they are related, yes. Two Blackletter fonts that might be of interrest are Moyenage and Blonde Fraktur, beacuse they include both Roman and Cyrillic characters.

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        • #5
          Gosh, I haven't had a need for a Blackletter font since playbills for the college theater department.
          Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

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          • #6
            I can't say I have ever used a blackletter font.
            It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

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            • #7
              I have used a number of Blackletter fonts such as Old Engish Text MT, Cloister Black BT, Fraktur BT and FetteFraktur.

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              • #8
                In branding/logo? Or in other kinds of design too?
                It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

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                • #9
                  No, I have played around with those fonts on my computer.

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                  • #10
                    Thinking about it more, I may have used blackletter once for a certificate. But in general, it's too hard to read easily and looks very dated unless married with bright colours.

                    What are you "playing" with in particular?
                    It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

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                    • #11
                      I don't have much trouble reading Blackletter, depending or your learing abilities, it can be quite easy to read once you get used to it.

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                      • #12
                        Not fonts per se, but I rather like some of the more outlandishly stylized Victorian "monumental" lettering -- the kind of thing that you'd see on huge, expensive gravestones, or the sign at the entry to a high-class graveyard. (Graveyard? Oops, too earthy. This is the Victorian era, so: cemetery? Memorial garden? Any of those.)

                        Not that the occasion will ever arise to use such odd birds. Just happen to like them.

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