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  • Head First HTML (or) Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing: which one?

    I'm debating between these 2 books:

    1. Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML and CSS in One Hour a Day (5th Edition)

    2006
    Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML and CSS in One Hour a Day is a new edition of the best-selling book that started the whole HTML/web publishing phenomenon. The entire book has been revised and refined to reflect current web publishing practices and technologies. It includes extensive coverage of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), which have become a staple in web development.

    You'll have no problem learning from expert author Laura Lemay's clear and approachable writing style. Simple, step-by-step instructions with lots of practical, interesting examples of web pages will guide you as you master current web publishing technologies and practices.
    2. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML (Paperback)

    2005
    Tired of reading HTML books that only make sense after you're an expert? Then it's about time you picked up Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML and really learned HTML. You want to learn HTML so you can finally create those web pages you've always wanted, so you can communicate more effectively with friends, family, fans, and fanatic customers. You also want to do it right so you can actually maintain and expand your Web pages over time, and so your web pages work in all the browsers and mobile devices out there. Oh, and if you've never heard of CSS, that's okay--we won't tell anyone you're still partying like it's 1999--but if you're going to create Web pages in the 21st century then you'll want to know and understand CSS.

    Learn the real secrets of creating Web pages, and why everything your boss told you about HTML tables is probably wrong (and what to do instead). Most importantly, hold your own with your co-worker (and impress cocktail party guests) when he casually mentions how his HTML is now strict, and his CSS is in an external style sheet.

    With Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML, you'll avoid the embarrassment of thinking web-safe colors still matter, and the foolishness of slipping a font tag into your pages. Best of all, you'll learn HTML and CSS in a way that won't put you to sleep. If you've read a Head First book, you know what to expect: a visually-rich format designed for the way your brain works. Using the latest research in neurobiology, cognitive science, and learning theory, this book will load HTML, CSS, and XHTML into your brain in a way that sticks.
    So what are you waiting for? Leave those other dusty books behind and come join us in Webville. Your tour is about to begin.
    I KNOW that #2 gets rave reviews (here and other places), so I'm thinking this one, but does anyone know about #1?

    Any differences between the two, and I AM a beginnger - brand new.

    All suggestions and feedback are welcome.
    Thank you.
    Please support justice for Bella

  • #2
    Head First. It got me my start in web design! I can't imagine my life right now if it weren't for this book...
    Last edited by CkretAjint; 12-24-2009, 02:05 PM.
    Professional Pixel Pusher Designing the world around you. | Working daily to reach 10,000 hours of practice.

    Comment


    • #3
      There ARE too many books to choose from!

      I'm thinking that one, too, Ckret.

      I know you highly recommend it, and I have checked it out once, but didn't get to 'read or practice' like I had anticipated because of other things.

      I did like what I read, though.
      Please support justice for Bella

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      • #4
        You could always read the Head First book for free...

        http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=5...age&q=&f=false

        Professional Pixel Pusher Designing the world around you. | Working daily to reach 10,000 hours of practice.

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        • #5
          Awesome!
          Saved to favorites.
          Please support justice for Bella

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          • #6
            Well, maybe I need to possibly purchase #1 since #2 is available online?

            I need a book for a complete beginner like myself, and I'm not near any bookstores to take a look around - and I hate that, too.

            I just didn't know if others had a favorite book in mind to get me started.

            Honestly, I'm so dang confused.

            Please support justice for Bella

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            • #7
              I'm not sure about books.

              I've got many on web design and they were all out of date by the time I bought them.

              spend your money on a lynda.com subscription or similar - that will get you started - take a look the first few tutorials are free

              they got me up to speed in no time at all - very, very easy to follow

              then, later, if you want to get a book, by all means go ahead, but in my experience your money is better off spent online.

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              • #8
                I spent 4 years in college getting a degree in web design. When I left, I barely knew anything about html- nothing of CSS/php/JS. The way they taught was- give you a chapter to read (never did it)- answer questions (took seconds)- do an assignment at the end of the chapter (just follow simple steps).

                Even the finals were easy, just assemble a few different pieces that you've done in chapters before.

                I got into it recently. Took a friends advice and went with Lynda.com, and in a little over a month (with 2 part time jobs), I knew HTML, AS3, JS, PHP, MYSQL, AJAX like speaking english. I have a 143 IQ though, and the logic just fell into place.

                People learn differently I guess. With books I have the problem of, reading a page- getting bored and skipping to something else.
                "I used to wonder what friendship could be, Until you all shared its magic with me." - Jesus Christ

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                • #9
                  HTML Dog (http://www.amazon.com/HTML-Dog-Best-...1686558&sr=1-1) or Build Your Website the Right Way with HTML and CSS (http://www.amazon.com/Build-Your-Web...1686449&sr=8-1) are good. the later (Build Your Website...) is better if you're an absolute beginner.

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                  • #10
                    Obsidian86,
                    I completely understand what you mean.
                    Sounds like you are VERY intelligent and a logical thinker.

                    If you don't mind me asking:
                    When you finished school with a Web Design degree, which you didn't feel like you learned a lot, did you market yourself as a Web Designer and seek employment?
                    -or-
                    Did you teach/learn for yourself and then market yourself some time after graduation?

                    I'm running into a similar situation myself.

                    Yes, I hear lynda.com is excellent.

                    Thank you.
                    Please support justice for Bella

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Pix,
                      Aw, I want the book just for the picture of the dog. LoL

                      Thank you so much for those 2 suggestions.
                      I would have NEVER thought (or) discovered them without your help.

                      Please support justice for Bella

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BeautyNut View Post
                        Obsidian86,
                        I completely understand what you mean.
                        Sounds like you are VERY intelligent and a logical thinker.

                        If you don't mind me asking:
                        When you finished school with a Web Design degree, which you didn't feel like you learned a lot, did you market yourself as a Web Designer and seek employment?
                        -or-
                        Did you teach/learn for yourself and then market yourself some time after graduation?

                        I'm running into a similar situation myself.

                        Yes, I hear lynda.com is excellent.

                        Thank you.


                        I didn't market myself as a web designer at first. I worked IT for about a year, while working there, I was also going to school getting another degree for Visual communications. I had the feeling I couldn't do web design. I would look at a page of Html source, and think to myself "There's no way...".

                        I started working as an in house designer for a Sign/car wrap/print place (current job). I got into web design, spent the time to learn it, and here I am. At my job, I meet a lot of companies that are just starting up, needing logo's, Business cards and stuff like that. Web-sites are also a great addition, so I guess they're my target market.

                        I just recently (within the last year and a half) started marketing myself as a web-designer. I wanted to make sure I knew how to do what I needed to do. I know some people who just copy and paste code, or use WYSIWYG editors, but I feel uncomfortable using any piece of code that I can't create from memory, or have an understanding why I'm using it.
                        "I used to wonder what friendship could be, Until you all shared its magic with me." - Jesus Christ

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I feel uncomfortable using any piece of code that I can't create from memory, or have an understanding why I'm using it.
                          Yep, you are intelligent.

                          That is what most web designers (many great ones here) suggest - LEARN the coding and do not let a program do it for you (at least for your career). If using for hobby/personal use, ah, it may be alright.

                          But, what if those programs have problems, and like you said, you will have no understanding of what to do from scratch if needed.

                          Great tips! Thank you.

                          True. Some people do NOT work well with books, and that's perfectly alright. Honestly, I'm more of a visual/hands-on learner myself. Lynda.com would probably be best for me as well.
                          It's just the money at this point, but one month or three month subscription isn't too bad. I couldn't afford a year's worth.

                          How long were you subscribed to lynda?

                          Thank you so much for replies.
                          Please support justice for Bella

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                          • #14
                            Beauty,

                            Have you checked to see if there's any of these titles at your library? I forgot about the library until last year, but I've found my library's selection is not too bad. You'll probably want to have one book as a permanent reference, but if one's is available at the library, you take it out for a test drive.

                            If you have a county library, check to see if you can request books from other county libraries, that's the way it works with mine. I request DVDs from other libraries all the time and get free entertainment instead of paying Netflix or Blockbuster. (Yeah, the DVDs are old, but there's still a bunch of stuff I've never seen.)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The advantage to books are is the author normally provides you with a path to build your skill incrementally in a clear manor. However, most of the time tutorials and online sources do not provide a very clear path to extend your knowledge. Instead they teach you a few things then leave it up to you to find the next step. A book or online resource all depends on whether you want everything nicely laid out or would like to stumble through and find your own way. Once you get beyond the basics though the web is far more productive in regards to learning a specific technique or procedure. However, in my experience I have found books to be and invaluable resource to learning the ropes.

                              With that said, the first book I read about HTML/CSS(nearly 4 years ago) was Build your Own Website the Right way. I use practices and procedures discovered in that book on a daily/weekly basis. If I were to recommend a single book about learning HTML/CSS in an efficient and clear manor for someone just starting out that would be it. I believe I finished that book in a few days just to give you a time frame. It won't teach you everything but it provides a very solid foundation in which to explore other more intermediate texts and understand online resources/references to advanced/intermediate techniques/lingo with more ease.

                              If you would like to learn the technical ins/outs, best practices and common terminology associated with the industry you shouldn't look to farther. One mistake I feel victim to before reading that book was exploring CSS before fully grasping HTML. CSS can't "exist" without an outlet and that outlet is HTML in this case. Exploring CSS while lacking an understanding of HTML will lead to a delayed understanding of the practical usage. So it would be best that any educational outlet in which you choose to go with should not only focus on CSS but HTML as well. The relationship between HTML and CSS can be represented in practical terms as HTML being a skeleton and CSS the skin. Both are equally important but without a solid skeleton skin will have nothing to support it and fall right off the bone.

                              Just to add its a similar situation with learning JavaScript, PHP, ASP, etc. Being reliant on third party tools can be ok. However, what becomes a common issue of concern is failure to complete a task at hand due to not understanding the abstraction that occurs between the framework and core code. Most evident when people who clearly pull code off the web and need to achieve something slightly different. Given a clear understanding of the "code behind the code" these types of modifications could be achieved without relying on others to do the work for them.

                              That is why I encourage you and anyone else exploring this industry to learn the basics of everything. Not because mark-up generators, JQuery, YUI, CakePHP, etc aren't great tools but because its just as important to become self reliant as it is to leverage the advantages of those great tools. In the end, knowing the "code behind the code" will make you more self reliant, extensible and able to adapt to changes in the industry. Ultimately allowing you to grow more effectively, provide a superior product and increase your marketability more efficiently.

                              That was the longest spiel I've given in a long time… It must just be that Christmas cheer, lol
                              Last edited by tZ; 12-24-2009, 11:52 PM.

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