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  • Creatives on Instagram and Facebook

    The topic of discussion is copyright and what you are actually doing with your pictures when you share them and what rights you are giving companies when posting.

    As an avid iPhone photographer who posts on several social networks a day, am I doing myself an injustice - A. by not watermarking my images B. by sharing quality pictures for free ?

    I believe as a creative, who makes a living off of being creative, I should hold my standards a bit higher in the digital world and start limiting what I post and where - and also placing watermarks on it all!
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    Is this important?
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    Complaining is silly
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    We should start a creative revolution
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  • #2
    Granted iPhone cameras are getting pretty much okay for everyday stuff, using them for salable art is silly. If you are going to worry about your photography, make it worthwhile. If you plan on using your "quality pictures" for work, don't post them on Instagram.

    I saw a commercial for some TV show last weekend where one girl is saying to another, "Twitter is stupid and Instagram is Twitter for people who can't read."

    Comment


    • #3
      I have to disagree with you entirely. http://instagram.com/othellonine - besides him there are countless instagramers who take amazing pictures solely with their iPhone.

      And I'm assuming you believe these social networks are essentially stupid, but I beg to differ. These networks give you instant access to celebrities and notable figures in our society that would not have been otherwise.

      Comment


      • Lucifer
        Lucifer commented
        Editing a comment
        Looks like you've already made up your mind. Why bother asking for opinions then? Print is right. If you want to make money off your pictures, buy a good camera.

      • VIDAL
        VIDAL commented
        Editing a comment
        Lucifer Thank you, I'm just curious as to what people in the GD forum have to say about the topic.

    • #4
      Everyone must decide for themselves whether "social networking" is worth their time. It's the same with everything.

      The problem comes when people make assumptions about others' priorities. I regularly encounter friends and others who'll "walk up" yapping about some celebrity they think everyone worships, or their political viewpoint of the day they're sure I share, or a YouTube video that's so bloody "viral" I must have seen it a thousand times.

      If only I had so much time to spend entertaining myself. I'd be hard-pressed waste it on any of that.
      I'd rather be killed than come to your party, but if you don't invite me, I'll kill myself.

      Comment


      • VIDAL
        VIDAL commented
        Editing a comment
        You bring up a great point about post value and what does that really mean - I find it hard to take people seriously due to the lack of curation/consideration when posting. (I've been a culprit of this as-well but to the extent of posting my own art/photos - not regurgitated memes) It's like we all signed up and purchased guns without proper gun training - in this case, social media training.

        You also make a good point about the usability in each network, but one noticeable thing as a writer on twitter, is the lack of characters that can be used - essentially placing my thoughts in a small, constrained box of 140 characters.
        Last edited by VIDAL; 12-22-2014, 02:36 PM.

      • HotButton
        HotButton commented
        Editing a comment
        I like the gun purchase / lack of training analogy. Now if only someone would develop a humility rifle.

      • VIDAL
        VIDAL commented
        Editing a comment

    • #5
      When I look at photography, I look at it two ways.
      Commercial and Art.

      Since I work in the design field specializing in large format printing, a camera phone image is the last thing I want to see in a print file. Even worse is what Instagram does to a camera phone image.
      If you want to do commercial art, use the correct tools.
      If you want to do socializing, use whatever you want.
      If you want to do Art, use whatever you want, with the caveat that if you want to reproduce it in a physical way (ie prints) then you want to have the best image and the best resolution you can get. iPhone and Instagram are NOT the way to do that. You might make great digital art, but it's trapped in a digital existence.

      But you seem to have made up your mind.

      I do happen to think social networks are a waste of time. That's my choice to do so.
      I prefer interacting with real people in the real world and I don't particularly care if they are rich and famous or not.
      You are free to disagree.

      Comment


      • B
        B commented
        Editing a comment
        PrintDriver wrote: "I do happen to think social networks are a waste of time. That's my choice to do so. I prefer interacting with real people in the real world..."

        You do realize that you've posted this and 33,000-plus other posts on this "social network", right?

      • VIDAL
        VIDAL commented
        Editing a comment
        GET'EM B! EVEN IF HE WAS REFERRING TO TWITTER AND INSTAGRAMIES!

      • PrintDriver
        PrintDriver commented
        Editing a comment
        Yup. I'm wasting time. I've already read all my technical journals. So I'm on here while waiting for files to open (or lately to save to PDF); during break and lunch at work; when I should be doing other tedious things at home....
        Last edited by PrintDriver; 12-24-2014, 12:47 PM.

    • #6
      What ROI have you accomplished so far? Does your time invested = profit or loss? What do you hope to gain with your social media "marketing"? A collection of celebrity BFF's? You do know that most celebrity accounts are not updated by the celebrity themselves, right? What "higher standards" are you referring to? And what do you think adding watermarks to your posts will protect exactly?
      Last edited by PanToshi; 12-22-2014, 04:00 PM.
      Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

      Comment


      • #7
        PanToshi I'll give you a breakdown because I like where you're heading with these questions.

        Big moments / ROI in using Social Media: (for me)
        1. Acquired my first "high paying" job in college at $15 dollars an hour working as a "social media specialist/coordinator" - reading web analytics, gaining notoriety - building a following and creating new professional business relationships because of it.
        2. Web Analytics has become the forefront for big businesses these days - even small businesses are interested in whose going where and how they can maximize profits by looking into the data.
        3. Fun - that's what it comes down to at the end of the day - I can be sitting down at a desk reading data, designing new marketing strategies based on current trends and watching the ideas flourish or fail - either way it's an experience that I've grown to love.
        4. Celebrity figures - I've had film directors, designers (from all over the world), and random artists respond to me, to which I have formed a network of these socialites that I can reach out to at anytime and ask for advice or assistance with a new project. I treat every person equally until they give me a reason not to, so when I say celebrity I really mean, people who have done something I consider noticeably great in their industry or field and have formed somewhat of a following.
        Time invested = Profit + Loss

        It's hard to gauge this since I have yet to write up an entire retrospect on the topic, but at a glance I can proudly say that if it was not for Linkedin and my Instagram account, I would have not been spotted by a recruiter who found me my first big paying salary job a year after graduating college and searching endlessly on my own. (50K+) a year.


        A collection of celebrity BFF's

        I can see you mock the idea, but when you can talk to a billionaire investor, whom you've never met in person, and actually receive sound advice, I'll take those BFF's any day.

        Higher standards and watermarks

        As I spoke to HotButton about - I believe this is a training issue which I can partially blame the older generation of designers for. There is no sole organization that designers look up too - everyone is so saturated by content that the "truth" of good design and technique gets lost in the mix of cultures and design websites that give different philosophies on the same subject without any certification from the design community as a whole - quite simply, is there a distinct body of designers, gestalt theorists, and business professionals who sit around at a table and tell people what's what for the design world?

        A watermark might not stop a person from screenshotting the work, patching over the logo, and stealing the media, but atleast the general public will be able to see my brand - whereever it goes - and that I believe is the sole purpose of design in general - to visually communicate the message or brand.
        Last edited by VIDAL; 12-23-2014, 10:39 AM.

        Comment


        • #8
          I'm not quite sure what this thread is about, but that's never stopped me from jumping in.

          If it's about social media in general, everyone has their own reasons for either participating or not, and everyone who does participate seems to have their favorite platforms and ways of using them.

          We have full-time social media people in my group. One of them absolutely loves Twitter since it enables her to keep track of what local news media professionals are chattering about behind the scenes, but she hates Facebook because it focuses on sharing baby photos and family chit-chat. Another loves Facebook because it enables her to target the largest possible audience, but hates Twitter because there's no substance for her in short, random messages. It's much the same story with Pinterest, Google+, LinkedIn, Snapchat, Instagram and whatever. Each has its own following, its reason for existence and each presents good communication and marketing opportunities to various audiences.

          Now if this thread is about copyrights and posting photos on social media networks, I'm not sure what the issue is. Posting low-res versions of photos online isn't exactly going to siphon off any legitimate purchases of those photos from someone needing them for other reasons. Those who do borrow/steal low-res photos are unlikely to have purchased them in the first place. Do it the right way and social media marketing can work out well for a photographer.

          That said, there's a significant difference between a snapshot and a professional photo. And there are significant quality and capability differences between smartphone cameras and traditional ones. I've seen great smartphone photos, and as good as they might be, a camera in a phone isn't a substitute for a good photographic equipment. I know several photographers and videographers who regularly take and post photos/video online with their smartphones, but the vast majority of their real work still depends on using good camera equipment.

          Comment


          • #9
            B, what is your occupation? I read Comm. Director, but what are your day to day tasks?

            Comment


            • B
              B commented
              Editing a comment
              Meetings with clients are tricky. One needs to be the person the client feels most comfortable working with.

              If the client likes to drink beer and go to clubs, that's what you do. If they like to get down to business with no nonsense involved, you do that. If they want to chit chat about fishing and golf, you suddenly develop an interest in those things. It's all billable time.

              We do lots of work for government agencies and scientists. These aren't exactly artsy or spontaneous people, and they're definitely not motivated by efficiency. What could quickly be dealt with in half an hour or, better still, via email, often stretches into four- or five-hour meetings talking about tedious, bureaucratic details which amount to nothing of consequence. Still, that's they're way of doing business.

              It doesn't seem to occur to them that at $XXX per hour multiplied by the number of us at the meetings often ends up eating half their budget. Honestly, I don't think it really matters to them.

            • VIDAL
              VIDAL commented
              Editing a comment
              B, so is that a freelancing dream? to work for government agencies who have an infinite budget? Do they allow you creative freedoms? Also which clients tend to allow social media presence/graphics into the mix? - Are there clients who mandate no sharing ala NDA contract

            • B
              B commented
              Editing a comment
              I didn't mean to imply that they have huge budgets because they rarely have enough to do what they want to do. They also tend to spread the money they do have way too thinly and with too little attention to strategy, quality, cost-effectiveness, detail or follow-through. It's often more about politics than actually accomplishing something worth doing.

              As for social media, how it's used and perceived is different from one company to the next. Most every organization seems concerned with social media, but some get it and some don't. Some are very cautious, while others take chances that they'd never do in more traditional mediums. Some CEOs are so involved that they maintain direct control over their Twitter accounts, while other let a minimum wage, part-time student handle the entire thing as though it really doesn't matter. Some fail to see the nuanced differences between, say, Instagram and Pinterest, while others build the bulk of their marketing strategies around exploiting those things made possible by those differences.

              In many ways, I think social media is approached by many organizations in a similar and mostly naive, hit-and-miss way that corporate websites were approached 15 years ago.

          • #10
            "In many ways, I think social media is approached by many organizations in a similar and mostly naive, hit-and-miss way that corporate websites were approached 15 years ago." Hitting the nail on the head with that qoute my friend. This is definitely the feeling I get when you get down to the niddygriddy of it all. There is just not enough attention paid to the strategy of things - which is why I made this thread in the first place. I feel as conscious users of "social media" on top of being creatives and me personally being apart of the Gen Y / C - I find that most of what i have been doing is on impulse and not real strategy - other than, " I'm not going to post that one picture of me wasted because I can get fired"

            Comment


            • #11
              I thought I'd jump in and give my two cents. Firstly I'm going to say, I love Instagram! It has done wonders for me. I have just graduated uni with a major in design and I use my account to post all my design and photography work. Since leaving uni I have landed 2 big projects for clients through my instagram. It's another way for me to get myself out there and showcase my work.

              Comment


              • #12
                Hi Mattenborough and welcome to GDF.

                We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
                Shop smart. Shop S-Mart.

                Comment


                • #13
                  Since this seems to have turned into a bit of a social media marketing thread, I'll jump in, too. I run social media campaigns for several clients in diverse fields and I work for another company that, without getting too specific, creates events where immediate and predictable social media "virality" occurs which generally covers entire cities.

                  The different sites, for now I'll just stick with the Big 3 of Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, have all developed their own kind of ecosystems. While Instagram and Twitter overlap a good bit, they still have distinct uses (although very similar, that quote about IG being for Twitter for people who can't read is spot on), and Facebook has slowly engulfed basically all of modern society to the point where there's beginning to be a backlash but nowhere for dissenters to really go.

                  To bring this back to the main point, what all three have ultimately achieved is to speed up the entire life-cycle of all kinds of media. Pictures, video, music, and even mottos can all go from never-heard-of-it to holy-crap-it's-everywhere-and-now-I'm-sick-of-it literally within days. What does that mean for the photo you posted to Instagram and somebody stole it? It means that it will/may reach a few thousand more people before it inevitably dies the horrible death of obscurity within a week or less.

                  The key is increasingly becoming not One Hit Wonders, but consistency and patterns. It isn't good enough to come up with a "Where's the Beef?" commercial, you need to come up with 10-15 commercials that all ask the same question with the same words in different ways. Success for the individual is being increasingly moved to the fringes of media, into niches and special interests, where there is less competition due to there being less noise. Noise is the problem, and if you know that, it can be your friend.

                  All of that being said, don't worry about someone stealing a low-resolution digital copy of your work, but as some other people have said, if you want to make money with your photography, the key is going to increasingly be to get it OFFline, into a printed format where you can sell it on a canvas/t-shirt/whatever and hopefully you can create a wide enough variety to get a bunch of impulse purchases or even a following, but the key is consistency and patterns. That way, if somebody steals one, it isn't a big deal, because you've got 50 more you're producing, and more in the pipeline.

                  I'll shut up now.

                  Comment


                  • #14
                    Originally posted by My First Post View Post

                    The key is increasingly becoming not One Hit Wonders, but consistency and patterns. It isn't good enough to come up with a "Where's the Beef?" commercial, you need to come up with 10-15 commercials that all ask the same question with the same words in different ways. Success for the individual is being increasingly moved to the fringes of media, into niches and special interests, where there is less competition due to there being less noise. Noise is the problem, and if you know that, it can be your friend.

                    All of that being said, don't worry about someone stealing a low-resolution digital copy of your work, but as some other people have said, if you want to make money with your photography, the key is going to increasingly be to get it OFFline, into a printed format where you can sell it on a canvas/t-shirt/whatever and hopefully you can create a wide enough variety to get a bunch of impulse purchases or even a following, but the key is consistency and patterns. That way, if somebody steals one, it isn't a big deal, because you've got 50 more you're producing, and more in the pipeline.
                    No - do not shut up. Continue with your infinite knowledge for us all... Thank you. Bye.


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