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  • Using your own photography as a Graphic Designer

    Hi all,

    Thanks for taking the time to read this.

    I am a graphic designer currently working on a job for a University. The current brief I'm working on is to produce valentines card templates to allow students to upload photos and. I have been asked to supply my own photography.

    Would any of you be able to recommend how to charge for this? The Creative Director suggested I would get paid every time a card is bought however I would rather charge per photo.

    Also I'm not sure how much I should charge, as an amateur photographer,

    Many thanks,

    Rich

  • #2
    Welcome to the forum Rich

    We don't allow pricing discussions - which is explained in the important links below.

    We ask all new members to read very important links here and here. These explain the rules, how the forum runs and a few inside jokes. No, you haven't done anything wrong, we ask every new member to read them. Your first few posts will be moderated, so don't panic if they don't show up immediately. Enjoy your stay.
    Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

    Comment


    • Rickon
      Rickon commented
      Editing a comment
      Hi Pan Toshi,

      Sorry about that, I read the rules a while ago and must have forgotten.

      I wasn't really after a price, more of advice on how I would charge i.e upfront or as and when bought.

      I'll have another flick through the rules.

      Thanks for your help.

      Rich

  • #3
    No worries Feel free to discuss ways to charge, etc. Just keep pricing-talk ambiguous (e.g.: I charge 3 elephants for...) and you should be golden. Thanks!
    Sketching not only helps you work out good ideas, it helps you get past the bad ones.

    Comment


    • #4
      Depends on how much the minimum wage is. I would also take into account how much my time is worth.

      Comment


      • #5
        When you use your own photography, you grant the client a closed-ended license for the specific image stating how long it may be used.

        When using imagery for specific print run objects like cards, a license is granted for the print run stating how many impressions and taking into account geographic distribution. The online ordering thing is why you see all stock licenses disallowing use on a template driven website. It is hard to charge for that kind of usage.

        Your post is confusing. Are you just using photos as samples? Or will the students be able to select your photos to use for their cards?

        If you are just using your images as samples, you would charge a simple web license based on how long the picture is going to be active on the website. If you want an example, go to Corbis, pick a Rights Managed image and go through the pricing interface. A license for a single image for a year can be mid 3 figures.

        If using for customer selection, I'd put a limit in for a specific number of downloads for a specific price. And build the website to say Sold Out when the count is hit.

        Licensing has nothing to do with minimum wage. It's all the traffic will bear. I sometimes pay $12 for an open-ended credit-stock Royalty Free image that the client wanted to use so badly, they might have paid $1200 if the image had been Rights Managed. The highest price I've paid for a stock image was for one from a well known Nat Geo photographer for a project that required a 10-year license. $$$$.

        As a photographer, it's hard to figure out what to offer. I've found most established photographers whose sole business is photography, have their own websites and their own online galleries are generally Rights Managed. People who just take shots with their point and shoot or are not as well established mostly appear in Royalty Free. RF images run the gamut from a couple bucks a piece to a couple hundred.

        If you are doing this gratis, you would still draw up a license just so there are no arguments later over who owns the photo, in case you want to license it to someone else later. BUT, if you are taking images while on your boss's dime, ie while during working hours, there is a very good chance the images will belong to your boss. This is "work for hire." Find out before you invest your own time into this.
        Last edited by PrintDriver; 01-17-2015, 01:43 PM.

        Comment


        • #6
          Wow, Thank you for sour response PrintDriver. Much appreciated and most useful.

          I'm still presenting some ideas to the boss so it's not established quite yet as to how the photos would be used. I used my DSLR rather than a "point and click camera".

          Its just I prompted her around the subject and she was making suggestions so just wanted to make sure I wasn getting value for my shots. I'm on a zero hours contract so I would normally charge for time spent taking photos however I took many of the shots before I started working there. Obviously in the past, when I've been working full-time in-house etc, I would just get paid salary for taking photos.

          I am envisaging their being some displayed as samples and some would be used as part of the design.

          Thanks again for the advice.

          Comment

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