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  • Need to buy a new digital camera

    I want something that is good enough to use on the press but also good for taking on trips and going out with friends. I don't really want a DSLR because I'm not going to be using this for serious photography. Mostly personal stuff and graphic elements like concrete textures, paint chipped walls, etc. Looking for about 6-8 megapixels.


    My mom has a Konica Minolta Dimage z4 which freakin rocked! had so many good features. And very good image quality too. What it had that I especially like was the long apature settings, anti-shake technology, video recording, extremely good night time pictures, and extremely good macro picture quality. I am just considering getting a Dimage Z6 except they are old now, and K/M no longer makes digital cameras. and I don't want problems with the internal battery from sitting on a shelf for over a year.

    Anyone familiar with the Dimage series and can recommend something similar? I might just go ahead and get the Z6, they are such awesome cameras.

    Thanks!
    "To be is to do" --Socrates.
    "To do is to be" --Jean-Paul Sartre.
    "Do be do be do" --Frank Sinatra

    .

  • #2
    I'm not familiar with the ones you mentioned. You might be able to find a good (unbiased) review at pcworld.com or epinions.com if you haven't already checked.

    there's some good advice here: http://www.graphicdesignforum.com/fo...ad.php?t=23545

    I like mine well enough, except that once I really started shooting with it and learning more about it I started looking into shooting RAW, and my camera doesn't have the capability. I use a Canon PowerShot S2 1S. The new model (the S3) came out recently though, and if it can shoot RAW it might be worth looking into. Hope that helps some!
    "It's never too late to be who you might have been." - George Eliot

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    • #3
      Doesn't look like the S3 does support RAW. At work we have a Powershot Pro, though, and that does support RAW. It's quite a nice camera, actually - most of the features of an SLR, but it's a compact.

      On the downside, you can probably actually find a low-end SLR that's cheaper.

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      • #4
        If you consider buying a large compact (sounds weird) camera, just go for a dSLR at once. If you are interested in photography, you will want to have the ability to change lenses and get a faster shutter reaction sooner or later, so I would go for a dSLR to save money and time.

        I had a Konica Minolta Z3. Very happy with the camera, but when I got the taste of it, I just couldn't keep my hands away from buying a dSLR.

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        • #5
          That's not necessarily true. Compacts do offer some features that are pretty much impossible on an SLR - such as being able to view on-screen while shooting - which some people might want.

          Plus, in a given price-range, you're often looking at a choice between a really good compact or a mediocre SLR.

          Personally, I went for the SLR, which was the right choice for me, but there are certainly reasons why others might choose the compact.

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          • #6
            You're talking about a film SLR vs. an "auto-shoot" digital, Hewligan. However, a digital SLR offers the best of both worlds. It does everything that either camera can do. LED display, easy camera-to-computer workflow, low developing costs, changeable lenses, fast adjustable shutter speed, adjustable aperture, etc. I can't see how you can go wrong - assuming you have the budget, of course.
            Last edited by Ned; 02-23-2007, 02:09 AM.
            Ned Yeung, A.C.E.
            mediamainline.com
            cyclopsphoto.ca

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            • #7
              No, actually I'm not.

              With a dSLR you can only ever shoot by viewing through the viewfinder. So far as I'm aware, no SLR, digital or not, can show you the live image of what you're pointing your camera at before you're shooting it on its screen. Depending on the design of the camera and the use that you're putting it to, this can be pretty handy.

              Also, a compact can shoot short video segments, which no SLR can do.

              I'm by no means trying to suggest that a compact is in any way superior - my own camera is an SLR - I'm merely pointing out that there are some reasons why other people might choose a high end compact over an SLR.

              It's a big digital camera market out there, with a lot of people with a lot of different needs. Just saying "If you can afford it you should buy an SLR" doesn't actually cover all of those needs.

              That's why the high end compacts exist.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hewligan
                No, actually I'm not.

                With a dSLR you can only ever shoot by viewing through the viewfinder. So far as I'm aware, no SLR, digital or not, can show you the live image of what you're pointing your camera at before you're shooting it on its screen. Depending on the design of the camera and the use that you're putting it to, this can be pretty handy.

                Also, a compact can shoot short video segments, which no SLR can do.

                I'm by no means trying to suggest that a compact is in any way superior - my own camera is an SLR - I'm merely pointing out that there are some reasons why other people might choose a high end compact over an SLR.

                It's a big digital camera market out there, with a lot of people with a lot of different needs. Just saying "If you can afford it you should buy an SLR" doesn't actually cover all of those needs.

                That's why the high end compacts exist.
                I got used to not using the screen very quickly. Because on a compact camera, the viewfinder will not give you the same precision as on a dSLR, because it often has no connection to the lens whatsoever (my KM Z3 did have a LCD screen inside the viewfinder, but most don't), so you would get more precision using the LCD than the viewfinder. But screens can be practical for photographing in weird angles where your head can't follow your arms. Especially flippable displays.

                The response of a dSLR is quicker than a compact, and this can be crucial for some type of photographing.

                I don't really miss the video feature on my camera, because nowadays most mobile phones got this (the quality is kinda crappy anyway, if you want good video quality, go buy a video camera).

                But the compact is cheaper, can be easier to use and more travel friendly. Therefore, I have both. A dSLR with equipment, and a compact camera. I also have a video camera, but I never use it (don't know why).
                Last edited by fredrich; 02-23-2007, 06:52 AM.

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                • #9
                  Fuji S5200 or higher for the compact dslr-like camera.

                  Broacher has the same one and I know another graphics firm in Manhatten that has the S5200.

                  The video quality is near DVD. The only difference is the audio - which is still very much good enough for most captures.
                  Influx is a movie that I partnered with on Skunkboy.net at Spirit Mountain ski resort. The movie is 100% Fuji.
                  Influx large (44 MB)
                  Influx small (3 MB)

                  This photo was taken last summer at full zoom (10x)standing about 6 feet away.
                  http://www.graphicdesignforum.com/fo...&postcount=231

                  My roommate runs http://skunkboy.net and between the two of us we've taken over 60,000 photos this past year with the fuji s5200 and s5100. Now he's looking at going with the Fuji 9100. Most the pictures from Spirit mountain and SE minnesota sections are from last year.

                  =)
                  Jade

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                  • #10
                    Drazan, I wasn't able to view the videos, the links both said permission denied or something like that when I clicked on them.

                    However, the rest of your post is giving me food for thought, as I'm in the market for my first digital camera, and I want something that will allow me the flexibility of point and shoot and also have manual controls. The 5200 seems to be in my general price range as well. I was also considering the Fuji E9000.

                    I'm definitely not advanced enough by any means to need a dSLR, but I do want something that will allow me to grow into that at some point down the road.

                    Camarota, this has been a very informative thread, thanks for creating it.
                    "Lucy, you got some 'splainin' to do!" - Ricky Ricardo

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                    • #11
                      Just copy and paste the url of the vids either into the browser or your media player.

                      There's http blocking on that - that I forgot about.

                      Or go to http://skunkboy.net/vids.php and click on Influx

                      =)
                      Jade

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                      • #12
                        Cool, that worked.

                        That's pretty impressive video coming off a camera in that price range, I have to admit. Makes it all the more tempting.
                        "Lucy, you got some 'splainin' to do!" - Ricky Ricardo

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