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What kind of camera do you recomend for a graphic designer?

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  • What kind of camera do you recomend for a graphic designer?

    ive been using an old compact digital camera of 5 megapixels ,its been ok but sometimes i would like to take pictures of things that are moving and not to get the image disorted by the speed or making lees retouch in photoshop cause the camera doesnt have much customization , and i hate the zoom that it has i messes the whole picture
    so what would you graphic designers recomend , im not a photographer but the image picture is such a great resource when making designs so im here asking.

    ive seen high end digital compact cameras , slr cameras and dslr cameras but idk if they are too much for what i want or maybe my lil and old compact digital camera is what i should stick with (even if i hate it :X )

    thank you very much for your opinion guys i apretiate it

  • #2
    Since you say you are not a photographer, what are you using the images for exactly?
    Reference/process shots, or actual product/model shots to be printed?

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    • #3
      I've been very pleased with the one that I have.
      "Lucy, you got some 'splainin' to do!" - Ricky Ricardo

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      • #4
        Originally posted by PrintDriver
        Since you say you are not a photographer, what are you using the images for exactly?
        Reference/process shots, or actual product/model shots to be printed?
        Hello printdriver , the answer for that question would be both :X , but i always use the images for making some kind of publication or flyer , so it would be very usefull for both jobs .

        Originally posted by urstwile
        I've been very pleased with the one that I have.
        lol nice i never thought of fujifilm cameras :P , i was just watching sony , canon , nikon and olympus thanks urstwile :3

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        • #5
          You're welcome.
          "Lucy, you got some 'splainin' to do!" - Ricky Ricardo

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          • #6
            Anyone else read that new book, "The Cult of the Amateur" by Andrew Keen?

            Don't. It's too good at articulating the causes of the underlying decay of our (and many others) professions.

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            • #7
              Are you referencing something Broacher?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Broacher
                Anyone else read that new book, "The Cult of the Amateur" by Andrew Keen?

                Don't. It's too good at articulating the causes of the underlying decay of our (and many others) professions.
                Hey dude u got me confused witha that reply

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                • #9
                  Sorry for that jump. But I'm thinking of PD's original response, which would have been mine. Why do we accept the fact that it's better for a designer to spend valuable career training hours developing more and more technical skills outside of our core area of design, when there already exists real professional experts (pro photographers) who can do the job now, and probably better?

                  Why? Because most of us are forced into it through low-end photo budgets that can barely cover weak stock photo purchases. But also because too many of us have also accepted the myth that 'amateur' means genuine, ergo 'better' --even when (maybe especially when?) the amateur in question is ourself.

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                  • #10
                    Yeah the photography community and design communities are pretty closely related in this issue. Based on the idea of being able to purchase design or photography skills.

                    People with disposable income go out and buy a $5000 dollar camera, or buy the Adobe Design suites and "become a designer/photographer" by learning the products but not understanding the industry. A lot of the time this is out of necessity their job/budget, boss, determines it or is perhaps simply a hobby (which I see most often in photography)


                    All that being said you are probably best off with a higher end digital point and shoot, try to find something with a low amount of shutter lag and something that will take good photos at higher Iso (800/1600) for when you need it. I would stay away from the DSLRs unless your willing to really invest yourself (and your money) in to learning it. I know too many people who buy them and get results worse then they could get from a decent point and shoot camera.

                    (In school, especially the arts majors, every girl with a camera is a photographer just so I don't leave out the guys, they all want to do graf and make edgy street art)
                    Tumblr Blog Thing

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                    • #11
                      That's interesting. I wonder what way things will be going? There is a demand these days for unstaged and unedited things. Not a huge demand, but there are whispers of it. Maybe it's laziness or maybe it's about the aesthetic too.

                      I heard Kate Bezar - founder of a magazine called Dumbo Feather talk in the weekend. She doesn't believe in staging, hair and makeup, artificial light etc. She doesn't even believe in editing text (she only edits for length).

                      Will pure honesty be the new black?
                      It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

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                      • #12
                        I think honesty is a part of it. I think it might be less like Kate Bezar and more along the lines of authenticity. Stepping away from corporations or corporate looks. The cult of the amateur won't last. There will always be amateurs and they either become pros or they don't. But I think because of the flood of designers/photographers quality and originality will have a higher premium.
                        Its already started to a point especially with number of blogs moving away from the teenager with a computer to legitimate business practice more transparency in business practices and pay it forward type of mentalities.
                        Tumblr Blog Thing

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                        • #13
                          I think it's important to note the difference between a photo that has been badly shot by an amateur and a photo that has natural lighting, no staging or editing that has been shot by a pro.

                          Even a polaroid shot by a professional can be a lovely thing.
                          It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

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                          • #14
                            Budafist, try to find a copy of that book I mentioned. I think the man makes a lot of great points about the growing impact of the anonymous amateur on not just professional markets, but culture and civilization in general. What happens when technology allows us all to have our own personal channel, books, videos, design studio, photo gallery-- is there a dark side to all this creativity for the masses? This book shows us where it's all heading... it's a decidedly dark place.

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                            • #15
                              Or maybe we've been in a dark place all along, and the additional accessibility for "the masses" is a good thing.
                              "Lucy, you got some 'splainin' to do!" - Ricky Ricardo

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