Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
3D graphics of pure maths Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
Search Search Module
Collapse

Advertisement Advertisement Module
Collapse

Featured Images Featured Images Module
Collapse

Mediabistro Creative Sites Mediabistro Creative Sites Module
Collapse
Latest Topics Latest Topics Module
Collapse

  • Lucifer
    Reply to Logo for a supplement company
    Lucifer
    I, personally, don't like the dumbbell idea. Check out ON and Dymatize. The dumbbell logo would look good if your client owned a gym.
    Today, 01:06 PM
  • mrbambocha
    Reply to Making a button with <table>
    mrbambocha
    Great! Thanks alot!
    Today, 10:05 AM
  • B
    Reply to Logo for a supplement company
    B
    I'm thinking that tagging a supplement product with the initials BS might not be the best marketing strategy.
    Today, 06:36 AM
  • Danx
    Your thoughts on this logo?
    Danx
    Hello,

    Please tell your honest thoughts on this logo. This is my first logo.



    UPlace is a shopping centre. The "U" can stand for "Ungasan", the...
    Today, 06:33 AM
  • vaprarts
    Reply to Logo for a supplement company
    vaprarts
    I feel the colors seperate the image losing the dumbell look from being the instant thought.. I think you would have better luck if you made the weights be different sizes. I feel this would show a dumbell...
    Today, 03:58 AM
Advertisement Advertisement Module
Collapse

Sponsors Sponsors Module
Collapse

X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 3D graphics of pure maths

    The fire extinguisher on this page has been made in a 2D graphics app, rasterised. Its quite normal to do this, but if it were made out of vectors in 3D would it really have been harder to achieve?

    http://dribbble.com/shots/215858-Fire-extinguisher


    Would it be possible to make exactly the same graphic (i.e. realistic) but purely from vectors.. shading, everything, pure maths and in 3D in say a comparable time or would you say that it would take much longer?

    Of course neither of use know how long it took to make and a skilled designer probably does everything fast, but in general, let your estimates rise to the top.

    This file in its raw form could be say 100MB, but if it were 3D, exactly the same and infinitely more malleable and flexible, it should be a mere few kilobytes right, it should just be numbers?

    I'm worried about file size and quality.

  • #2
    long answer. maybe.

    3D models have many layers to make them shine.

    1) the model, this can be done in an Auto cad program in pure maths like you mention. It can also be done organically in modo or zbrush, or a combination in such programs as maya, blender, or 3d studio max. This step many find to be the easiest part.

    2) unwrapping the mesh. In order to create the texture and color the mesh (the model above is a mesh) is then grouped and unwrapped into a flat 2d texture file.

    3) creating the various maps from the unwrapped mesh. This is the color, transparency, bump, displacement, specular, reflective, and can be even more. Each of these elements require a separate "map". So in effect you can load 8 maps overtop each other to achieve one effect. The more maps, the more detail, and the more "real" the 3d object is.

    Once you have all of those things, then you load your mesh obj and all it's maps into a 3d program that can render it. But that's not the end of it.

    Now you will need to know how to set up an environment so that the shiny has something to reflect from. Also you will need to know lighting, HDR, camera focas, etc.

    OH, and then if you want the hose to bend or the trigger to move you'll need morphs, and bones, and how to manipulate kinetics.

    yep, sometimes it's just easier to make a photoshop image.

    Comment


    • #3
      Sure, you can do anything in any program...if you really want to. The key here is...how much time are you willing to spend to create such a piece?
      "Go ahead, make your logos in PS. We charge extra money to redraw your logo into vector art so it can be printed on promotional product. Cha CHING! " - CCericola

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Drazan View Post
        long answer. maybe.

        3D models have many layers to make them shine.

        1) the model, this can be done in an Auto cad program in pure maths like you mention. It can also be done organically in modo or zbrush, or a combination in such programs as maya, blender, or 3d studio max. This step many find to be the easiest part.

        2) unwrapping the mesh. In order to create the texture and color the mesh (the model above is a mesh) is then grouped and unwrapped into a flat 2d texture file.

        3) creating the various maps from the unwrapped mesh. This is the color, transparency, bump, displacement, specular, reflective, and can be even more. Each of these elements require a separate "map". So in effect you can load 8 maps overtop each other to achieve one effect. The more maps, the more detail, and the more "real" the 3d object is.

        Once you have all of those things, then you load your mesh obj and all it's maps into a 3d program that can render it. But that's not the end of it.

        Now you will need to know how to set up an environment so that the shiny has something to reflect from. Also you will need to know lighting, HDR, camera focas, etc.

        OH, and then if you want the hose to bend or the trigger to move you'll need morphs, and bones, and how to manipulate kinetics.

        yep, sometimes it's just easier to make a photoshop image.


        Thanks Drazan, sorry for the long delay, I was snowed under with my workload. Very thorough answer, gives a non-3D guy a good idea of what's entailed.

        Now, it seems like for the most part the whole thing can be maths, until adding textures, but like you say it can be complete maths if so desired but that requires more work and more layers, more complex too. Although I'm not familiar with all the programs you mention, does it really require a plethora of separate ones to achieve one thing?

        While 3D Studio Max can do the model (mesh) are you saying it can't then go on to do decorate that mesh? Is it really unwrapped into 2D, why not just bring it to life in 3D, how can a 3D object be worked on in 2D I wonder, still again, I'm not familiar with the process.

        When you say more maps is more detail, just to be clear, we're still only talking about a few Kb of data right, this is all still numbers (i.e. vectors)?

        When you mention loading all the 3D objects and its maps into a 3D program environment to render it, what exactly is the point in rendering? Scanning through an entry in Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renderi...puter_graphics)) it pretty much explains what I thought in that the process makes things look nice. Well, fine, but for what I want I am looking for something which is real time, like a computer game but in a desktop environment if you see what I mean.

        This also feeds into the other aspect I am looking at - motion. You mention "morphs, and bones, and ... manipulate kinetics", I found a tutorial that uses a "morph target to drive a bone rotation" (http://sciencestage.com/v/21391/3dsm...-rotation.html) demoing motion, not that tricky to my eye, but not too sophisticated either. But on the lines for what I'm looking for.

        As far as I can tell the fire extinguisher can be made exactly as the example was given, done, the motion aspect is covered to, but, I'm looking for something more, I'll explain. You say that the rendering process is the final one (bar motion), so the object is created and the mesh detailed to look real, but then it has to be rendered. Well, I am looking for a way to have say the metal body of the extinguisher react to its environment, to rust or fade lets say, depending on the elements it's exposed to.

        Would that then be something different from rendering? Because it would be rendered in real time to my mind, the idea I have is that the object is constantly changing, morphing, so if you imagine the environment on the desktop it's placed in has a point of light, this environment would weather the metal casing, let's say bleach the colour, but would that be possible with the object after it has been rendered in the traditional manner can the outer layer have code to make it react to different elements, like rusting in rain as well?

        I was thinking about COLLADA, it's an open format and I like that route, but not sure how mature the format is. I am looking for probably something that does not exist yet. I see materials being used for models instead of fake methods to achieve realism. That would be metal sheeting to achieve the outer red metal casing look of the model, rather than eight layers of maps, and because its a metal texture it's programmed with code that reacts as metal does, maybe different types of metal like copper, which goes teal in colour or iron that rusts and blisters in the sun and rain over time.

        So the models are real, they really react to their elements.


        What do you think?

        Comment


        • #5
          Sorry for the delay in answering this... life also got to me.

          COLLADA is a collection of data to transfer in between programs.

          What you need is a program that can do special effects. I believe that 3dmax does have the capability, or may need a plugin.

          You'll need to look at particle engines which given data can simulate the execution of that data over a timeline.

          Comment

          Mediabistro A division of Prometheus Global Media home | site map | advertising/sponsorships | careers | contact us | help courses | browse jobs | freelancers | content | member benefits | reprints & permissions terms of use | privacy policy Copyright © 2014 Mediabistro Inc.
          Working...
          X